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Steve

Delray Beach, FL, United States
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Read The Small Print In The Title. Forewarned.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-11-18

Read the title of this book very carefully, especially the last line - A Friendship That Changed Our Minds - that's what this book is all about. The friendship of two men. It's not about the work they did and how it has changed us. I was expecting a great deal more about their work. Not what I wanted

Great Premise. Then It Got Violent And Very Weird.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

This story hit all the right notes until someone got their head blown off with a shotgun. The extreme violence, (there's more), didn't make any sense, it didn't add anything. I was well hooked by the story but the violence took me out of it. Worse, was the failure to follow through on a great premise; reliving your life with all your retained knowledge. All the possibilities. But the story didn't go there. Instead we got a lot of mechanics on Quantum Theory and time paradoxes. The time paradoxes just got too complicated. I quit trying to keep up, and ended up sort of 'power listening' through to the end just to hear what the end was. I just got more lost. The second half of the book didn't go where I wanted to to.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

A Genius Unfettered By The Fear Of Failure.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-27-18

An autistic billionaire genius. Amazing. So what can a genius accomplish unfettered by the fear of failure? Quite a lot. Way to go Elon - leap frogging tradition. (But sorry about the people who have to work with you).

Not For Deep Thinkers

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-18

This book is at best the same predictable scenario repeated over and over: "The _______ is/are getting closer and closer". Insert in the blank, monsters, storm, more monsters, another storm, radiation, cancer, another storm and then of course more monsters. In all instances add the additional insight: "We're out of time!!! We're not going to make it!!!". But then make it out ok - most of the time. It got to where I quit caring and started talking back to the book. Then it got interesting and I made it through..
This might make a good drinking game. Listen to this book as a group and whoever can shout out the next line first doesn't have to drink but then everyone else does. I think I could stay pretty sober. This book is not deep thinking by any means. Who are the monsters? How did they get that way. You'll never know because, "We're out of time!!!".

9 of 12 people found this review helpful

Too clean. Too long. Distracting narration.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-29-18

Kennedy used blunt and colorful language but you won't hear any of it in this book. I was very disappointed - I wanted to know who this man was. Instead I heard a cleaned up version of Joe Kennedy and his family. The fact that the family paid for this book to be written is admitted in the book's prologue. So don't expect anything too revealing.
Badly in need of editing. Way too many communications, letters and newspaper articles that should have been reduced in number and summarized. 31 hours is 10 hours too long.
The narrator's attempt at accents fails throughout. Comically at times.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

A Bloodbath Of Racial Hatred

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-17

He may only have been the necessary evil needed to counter the evil oppressors. The story presented devolves simply into a lifetime of one racially motivated massacre after another. Mindless violence, unconnected to any cause other than that of total annihilation. By the end, Bolivar's vision for an American Liberation becomes only a footnote to all the carnage. He may have originally had good and pure intentions as a young man, but his final legacy is finally only that of extreme violence and vanity. Not the George Washington I know.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

Northern CA Is A Little Bit Creepy.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-17

I've lived in northern California, in Stockton and the Bay Area. There is an under-current of violence there that I've that always felt but couldn't understand. This book helps to identify why I've felt that way. It is physically one of most beautiful places on earth but it is a land of political extremes with extreme actors who've been swept up by the politics and have done some very very bad things. The book left me saddened that for all the gains we've had there they had to come at the expense of so many great losses. The violent under-current gives the beauty a hard edge still today. Nirvana comes at a cost.

A Too Studious Examination

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-17

If you're going to use the word 'Assholes' in the title then a little levity might be expected in the book. But instead, this is a very serious examination, if you will, of people with difficult personalities, (i.e. assholes). If you're open to the title then you're likely open to a little joke here and there but be forewarned, there are very few. I don't think it was good judgement to use the word asshole every paragraph of such and academic discussion. Such a dry examination using such a lighthearted word was off kilter.

Want To Understand America? Go To Paris.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-16

I was amazed at how much Paris has affected so many of our greatest Americans. Our nation, so raw and new in the 1800's had nothing like a Paris to draw such inspiration from. America at that time had no libraries or museums or great universities. At that time if you wanted to be the best at what did you had to go to Paris to learn how to do it. Fortunately for us, Paris was there to fire and inspire our best and brightest and they came back to America and became American Masters.
David McCullough immerses you in the Parisian experience and leaves you wanting to buy the next ticket to get to the city. Edward Herrmann is, as always, impeccable.

The True Architect Of Our American Experiment.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-06-16

I finished this book with a new and greater appreciation not only for John Adams but for the reaffirmation that our country was not founded on the actions a few uneducated rebels but by the persuasive powers of several well educated idealists. That our origins are based on logic and reason and respect for human history and dignity. That the most persuasive of those idealists was John Adams. This book is a great experience to read. Having just endured another presidential election in 2016 reading this book is a tremendous reassurance from the past from America's greatest architect. Thank you, David McCullough and thank you, Edward Herrman. This book is a gem.