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Giri

College Station, TX, United States
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  • Spillover

  • By: David Quammen
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Yen
  • Length: 20 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 668
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 601
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 605

The emergence of strange new diseases is a frightening problem that seems to be getting worse. In this age of speedy travel, it threatens a worldwide pandemic. We hear news reports of Ebola, SARS, AIDS, and something called Hendra killing horses and people in Australia - but those reports miss the big truth that such phenomena are part of a single pattern. The bugs that transmit these diseases share one thing: they originate in wild animals and pass to humans by a process called spillover. David Quammen tracks this subject around the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good story with a few slow moments

  • By K on 05-11-14

Engaging, masterful and terrific

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-13

What did you love best about Spillover?

The selection of stories, the development of context in each case and the scholarship required to produce this volume. On top of that the prose is outstanding. I have read three other of Quammen's books and I have been just as interested in all the topics of his other books, but this easy equals and possibly exceeds his other works.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Spillover?

The interlude of the imagined story of the voyager in the history of HIV. Gripping!

Which scene was your favorite?

Spelunking into the bat caves in Uganda.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

"opportunity lurks in every bat"

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Steve Jobs

  • By: Walter Isaacson
  • Narrated by: Dylan Baker
  • Length: 25 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,293
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,321
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,284

Based on more than 40 interviews with Jobs conducted over two years—as well as interviews with more than a hundred family members, friends, adversaries, competitors, and colleagues—Walter Isaacson has written a riveting story of the roller-coaster life and searingly intense personality of a creative entrepreneur whose passion for perfection and ferocious drive revolutionized six industries: personal computers, animated movies, music, phones, tablet computing, and digital publishing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting man

  • By Jeanne on 11-13-11

Well worth reading/listening, terrible performance

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-11

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I wish it had a better voice. I will recommend the book, but the narrator just makes the whole experience boring and leaves you with a bad taste.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Steve Jobs?

Loved reading about his childhood. A close second was circumstances of him meeting his biological sister.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

He was boring, flat and just missed the tiny variations that bring life to words. He had a droning delivery which made some of the quirkier and funny portions of the book very unfunny. And finally when he quotes Steve Jobs or anyone else, he just sounds lame.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I was moved by the thread of Steve Jobs' life - his passion for his work and his quest for beauty and simplicity in what he envisioned Apple to produce.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Stiff

  • The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers
  • By: Mary Roach
  • Narrated by: Shelly Frasier
  • Length: 8 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,244
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,480
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,486

For two thousand years, cadavers have been involved in science's boldest strides and weirdest undertakings. They've tested France's first guillotines, ridden the NASA Space Shuttle, been crucified in a Parisian laboratory to test the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin, and helped solve the mystery of TWA Flight 800. For every new surgical procedure, from heart transplants to gender reassignment surgery, cadavers have been there alongside surgeons, making history in their quiet way.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful and En'gross'ing

  • By Joel on 05-28-05

Its a great book, but avoid around meal times

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-11

Would you listen to Stiff again? Why?

Some parts, maybe. I was especially intrigued by cannibalism, plastination and grave robbery parts. There is so much more there than what seems to be.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Its hard to say - many interesting characters in there.

What about Shelly Frasier’s performance did you like?

Fantastic - she does a great job of conveying the wry, tongue-in-cheek humor that is scattered around the book. I felt the entire time that she was speaking directly to me of her experience - and created a powerful effect. For that reason I was so effected to feel uncomfortable in some portions of the book.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Did not move me - but it did my insides. I am a scientist myself and have performed dissections of dead mammals and birds, but I felt queasy at times myself.

The Emperor of All Maladies audiobook cover art
  • The Emperor of All Maladies

  • A Biography of Cancer
  • By: Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 20 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,678
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,679
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,678

Written by cancer physician, researcher, and award-winning science writer Siddhartha Mukherjee, The Emperor of All Maladies is a stunning combination of medical history, cutting-edge science, and narrative journalism that transforms our understanding of cancer and much of the world around us. Mukherjee examines cancer with a cellular biologist's precision, a novelist's richness of detail, a historian's range, and a biographer's passion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Spectacular!

  • By Paul on 11-25-10

Tons of information, but a bit tedious in places

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-11

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

Probably - likely to my doctor friends. I went with the impression (based on interviews I heard and reviews I read) that there would be a lot of the 'natural history' of cancer - how cancers are and how they differ and how they do what they do. But I came away with just a history of cancer, and specifically about how cancer therapy came to be. A bit disappointed by it. I felt I did not learn much about cancer in the end.

Would you be willing to try another book from Siddhartha Mukherjee? Why or why not?

Depends - will need some careful consideration

Did Stephen Hoye do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

Yes.

Was The Emperor of All Maladies worth the listening time?

About half of it.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful