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scott bowlby

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  • Deuteronomy

  • By: Dr. Bill Creasy
  • Narrated by: Dr. Bill Creasy
  • Length: 6 hrs and 42 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 184
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 156

In the Bible’s longest soliloquy, Moses imparts his final thoughts to the people of Israel. Deuteronomy is not a “repetition” of the Law, but a retelling of it to a new audience, on the backside of 40 years of experience. Join Logos Bible Study’s Dr. Bill Creasy as we listen to Moses address a new generation of God’s people on the plains of Jericho.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Bible comes to life....

  • By Nathan North on 04-30-14

Another fantastic set of lessons

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

I really enjoy Dr. Creasy's method of discussing the Bible. Deuteronomy is a tough book, but Dr. Creasy manages to open your mind to it.
I took one star off the performance rating because there is an editing mistake where the lessons for Deut chapter 27 precede the lessons for chapter 26. Also, the audio for the misplaced lesson is horrible.

Still well worth listening to.

  • Edge of Eternity

  • The Century Trilogy, Book 3
  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 36 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,198
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,239
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,218

Throughout these books, Follett has followed the fortunes of five intertwined families - American, German, Russian, English, and Welsh - as they make their way through the twentieth century. Now they come to one of the most tumultuous eras of all: the enormous social, political, and economic turmoil of the 1960s through the 1980s, from civil rights, assassinations, mass political movements and Vietnam to the Berlin Wall, the Cuban Missile Crisis, presidential impeachment, revolution - and rock and roll.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Some good, some bad

  • By Elisa on 09-22-14

It just got worse and worse

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-20-16

I made the mistake of buying all three books before getting halfway through the first one, so this review covers my reaction to all three.

In my opinion, in good historical fiction the reader should be unable to discern the author's political leanings. This author fell woefully short of that goal, and didn't even keep it entertaining to make up for his shortfall.

This trilogy started off ok in the first book. You could still tell the author favored one political ideology, but it wasn't over the top and the writing reflected the moods of the various countries at the time. There's a lot of romance drama, which is ok if the romantic characters are interesting. Unfortunately, they weren't.

Further on in the trilogy the whole saga just slides into revisionist propaganda when the author even bothers to sprinkle a little 'history' into his soap opera. The characters become less and less interesting as if the author gave up on them.

I wish I hadn't have purchased all three audiobooks before finishing the first one. I feel like I've wasted my money.

  • White Flag of the Dead: White Flag of the Dead, Book 1

  • Zombie Survival Series
  • By: Joseph Talluto
  • Narrated by: Graham Halstead
  • Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 316
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 293
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 290

Millions died when the Enillo Virus swept the earth. Millions more were lost when the victims of the plague refused to stay dead, instead rising to slaughter and feed on those left alive. For survivors like John Talon and his son Jake, they are faced with a choice: Do they submit to the dead, raising the white flag of surrender? Or do they find the will to fight, to try and hang on to the last shreds of humanity?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 'FLAG' White Flag of the Dead as a Must Listen!

  • By Tracy P. on 12-12-18

Just Awful

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-16

I don't expect astounding literary skills when I buy a zombie-fiction. That being said, this book should have been titled "White Flag of the Author: The Fall of the Thesaurus".
The plot was cookie-cutter. The characters were so shallow that it seemed the even other characters didn't care who lived or who died, much less the author or this reader.
The author pretty much wrote a checklist of stuff he's read in other books, and chucked them into chapters with no buildup or continence. For example, a supporting character is killed. The protagonist is devastated in one sentence, then joking around in the very next.
The character backgrounds (what little was given) were predictable and the big showdown was so cheesy I think an 11 year old actually wrote it.
The writing itself was horrible as well. Sentences like "Chad and I were up planning and came up with a plan" litter the book. I lost count at how many times the same word was used twice in a dialogue sentence. The narrative was filled with a lot of "I can't be bothered to write details" stuff like "[Some character] and I walked to the [place]. We didn't talk because we were each lost in our own thoughts." "We gathered such things as we could find, and such".
The few times the author broke out his thesaurus were completely awkward to the story as well. The protagonist suddenly starts narrating with metaphor and thought provoking prose in the middle of a wrestling match with zombie, for instance. Then relapses back into Neanderthal-speak once the action is over.


All in all, the book was horrible.

26 of 37 people found this review helpful

  • The Jakarta Pandemic

  • By: Steven Konkoly
  • Narrated by: Joseph Morton
  • Length: 16 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,649
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,509
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,507

In the late fall of 2013, a lethal pandemic virus emerges from the Islamic Republic of Indonesia (IRI) and rages unchecked across every continent. When the Jakarta Flu threatens his picture-perfect Maine neighborhood, Alex Fletcher, Iraq War veteran, is ready to do whatever it takes to keep his family safe. As a seasoned sales representative for Biosphere Pharmaceuticals, makers of a leading flu virus treatment, Alex understands what a deadly pandemic means for all of them.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Halfway Boring

  • By Paul on 04-22-14

Survival fiction as written by a clueless liberal.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-14

The author takes what could otherwise have been a great plot and destroys it with awkwardly applied liberal talking points. It's like the author tried to hide his views, but couldn't help himself when it came to certain topics. Some highlights of liberal idiocy include:
The protagonist is ex-military, so of course he has PTSD and his wife is worried he may go crazy on them.
The only other guy in the neighborhood who is reasonably prepared for a long term food shortage and has firearms is a "rabid Republican" and owns "entirely too many guns". (Which is odd, considering the protagonist has plenty).
The protagonist, who is a combat-veteran Marine, is afraid to carry a loaded shotgun, preferring to "load it if he must". Uh-huh---sure--cause there is always plenty of time to stop and load a pump action shotgun in face-to-face altercations.
The protagonist (did I mention he is supposedly a combat-veteran?) calls his AR-15 an "assault rifle".
Fox News is trashed as unreliable, but NBC has cutting edge information that undermines the official federal position on the pandemic.
The protagonist refuses to share his own food and supplies (reasonable under the circumstances) and is generally against any 'share the wealth' programs early on, but has no problem sanctioning squatters' liberation of his neighbor's homes. (Don't take my stuff, take theirs!)

The end result is a very frustratingly unbelievable story. I don't mind listening to a survival story written by liberal or anti-gun author, heck, Stephen King writes quite a few good ones. But this author does a poor job of separating his thoughts from the thoughts of his characters.

Second complaint is the useless minutia of description. We have to suffer through the exact color and type of clothes the character dons, along with the clothes he failed to choose, multiple times for no apparent reason. Also, a long dissertation on how the neighborhood has a high rate of anorexia early on in the book is a precursor to us discovering... nothing. Its like the author had a minimum word count he had to fulfill and decided to do it by adding trivial nonsense.

Lastly, the narrator was mind-numbing. I've listened to 4th graders with better reading skills. It sounds like he is reading the phone book. It is terribly annoying when you cannot tell whether a narrator is reading dialogue. This guy's voice remains completely unchanged from dialogue to non-dialogue, making it hard to figure out when the character stopped talking.

17 of 25 people found this review helpful

  • Cell

  • A Novel
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Campbell Scott
  • Length: 12 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,427
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,985
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,994

The cause of the devastation is a phenomenon that will come to be known as The Pulse, and the delivery method is a cell phone. Everyone's cell phone. Clay and the few desperate survivors who join him suddenly find themselves in the pitch-black night of civilization's darkest age, surrounded by chaos, carnage, and a human horde that has been reduced to its basest nature...and then begins to evolve.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very, very compelling

  • By Vicki on 01-27-06

It was a struggle to keep listening.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-02-12

I usually like Stephen King books, but this one just failed. The story was weak with huge holes in it, the characters had no depth, and the story was entirely too predictable. Scott Campbell read the story in a mind-numbing monotonous voice also. I think he was trying to capture some emotion of despair, but it fell flat and sounded more like he was bored.

The older I get, the less I care for King. His works fascinated me as a teen, but either I am getting wiser, or King is getting less and less able to tell a story without turning it into a platform to push his political views on others.

Mr. King should also at least try to modernize his knowledge of weapons. It is clearly obvious from reading his books that he doesn't like firearms or firearms owners, and that is fine if he feels that way. But it doesn't excuse his ridiculously poor research when it comes to firearms. His continual use of "45 Colt revolvers" and "dum-dum" rounds in his books makes me wonder if his research into firearms ever extended past a childhood reading of Louis L'Amour.
No "right wing gun nut" as portrayed in the book, would ever equip his wife's kitchen with a revolver as old and unwieldy as a 45 Colt Revolver. A snub nosed .357 would have been more realistic, instead of a 6-8 inch barreled monstrosity whose cylinder must be loaded a single bullet at a time (he got the method of loading wrong also). Revolvers of that type also don't come with a safety catch. (Nor do most any revolvers).

Also, hollow point bullets are not 'dum-dum' bullets, and neither type are illegal in any state except New Jersey. Either type of expanding bullet would also not be "cop killer" bullets. In fact, expansion type bullets like these are stopped faster than regular ones by the body armor police wear.
Last, it would be a very rare gun-owner indeed who kept a fully automatic Kalishnikov (AK47) hiding in their garage. I really don't even see what King's purpose was for the introduction of that gun into the story was, other than to propagate the idea that every legally gun-owning American secretly has a stash of impossible to obtain military hardware that if caught with (unlicensed) they would spend over a decade behind bars.

If Stephen King really dislikes guns so much, he should leave them out of his stories. Arm his characters with strongly worded legislation to drive away the ghouls and bandits. That should work, right?

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Mammoth Hunters

  • Earth's Children, Book 3
  • By: Jean M. Auel
  • Narrated by: Sandra Burr
  • Length: 31 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,991
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,465
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,485

Ayla, the independent heroine of the Earth's Children series, sets out from the valley on Whinney, the horse she tamed. With her is Jondalar, the tall, handsome, yellow-haired man she nursed back to health and came to love. Together they meet Mamutoi - the Mammoth Hunters - people like Ayla.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Exciting 3rd episode in this 'Mammoth' series

  • By PlantCrone on 08-10-15

Caveman romance for folks with short memory spans.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-23-12

This book seriously needed a good editor. The constant repetition of the same storyline over and over gets ridiculous!
I can understand a reminder or two from previous books, lots of authors do that, but this author spends a third of the book repeating the same details. I also really dislike that the storyline has spiraled downward from prehistorical fiction to poorly crafted romance novel. I hope this trend doesn't continue.
The narrator is horrible, she sounds like she is reading a child's fairytale book. (Think of a nursery school reading of Momma, Poppa, and Baby Bear's lines.) Her depiction of the voices of nearly everyone in the Lion camp is exactly the same, and all are overenthusiastic caricatures.

I liked Clan of the Cave Bear, and thought The Valley of the Horses had some good parts. This book, however, holds virtually no appeal. I gave it two out of five stars because you might get two hours of entertainment out of each five hours of listening.
I will give the fourth book a try because I'm stubborn about finishing things, but if it reads like this one I am done with this series.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Samuel Adams

  • A Life
  • By: Ira Stoll
  • Narrated by: Paul Boehmer
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81

Ira Stoll's fascinating biography not only restores this figure to his rightful place in history but portrays him as a man of God whose skepticism of a powerful central government, uncompromising support for freedom of the press, concern about the influence of money on elections, voluble love of liberty, and selfless endurance in a war for freedom has enormous relevance to Americans today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not just a biography. Must-read American History!

  • By scott bowlby on 01-15-11

Not just a biography. Must-read American History!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-11

I listened to this book at the suggestion of a friend, and I was very impressed! I had no idea how much I did not know about Samuel Adams. I discovered a lot of new details I didn't know surrounding many historical events in American history, like Paul Revere's ride and the creation of the U.S. Constitution. I thought Chapters 6 and 7 were worth the price of the book all by themselves! Even if you don't think you are interested in this founding father, if you are interested in American History, you need to listen to this book.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful