LISTENER

Anonymous

  • 19
  • reviews
  • 111
  • helpful votes
  • 155
  • ratings
  • American Icon

  • Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company
  • By: Bryce G. Hoffman
  • Narrated by: Pete Larkin
  • Length: 14 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,498
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,339
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,336

At the end of 2008, Ford Motor Company was just months away from running out of cash. With the auto industry careening toward ruin, Congress offered all three Detroit automakers a bailout. General Motors and Chrysler grabbed the taxpayer lifeline, but Ford decided to save itself. Under the leadership of charismatic CEO Alan Mulally, Ford had already put together a bold plan to unify its divided global operations, transform its lackluster product lineup, and overcome a dys­functional culture of infighting, backstabbing, and excuses.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The best business book I ever read

  • By Michael on 10-07-12

A Very Good Business History Book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-17

Somewhat flattering occasionally, but an excellent listen. Well written and well narrated, you won't be disappointed.

  • Make Art Make Money

  • Lessons from Jim Henson on Fueling Your Creative Career
  • By: Elizabeth Hyde Stevens
  • Narrated by: Mary Robinette Kowal
  • Length: 12 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 163
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 151
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 151

In our culture, artistic genius and poverty seem inevitably linked, but does it have to be that way? Jim Henson didn’t think so. An iconic creator and savvy businessman, Henson is a model for artists everywhere: Without sacrificing his creative vision, Henson built an empire of lovable Muppets that continues to educate and inspire - and a business that was worth $150 million at the time of his death. How did he ever pull it off? And how can other creators follow in his path?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • From a Muppet/Henson Fan

  • By Ed on 11-21-14

Not Really a Book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-17

This would more accurately described as a series of articles, each discussing an aspect of a single theme or subject. Often re-treading the same ground, content, and quotes over and over, you'll fail to believe that the publisher hires editors.

Other Points

• The research for the book appears to be based largely on Hensen's work and quotes from the internet, rather than interviewing those involved.

• There is a solid misunderstanding of how most business, and especially marketing, works.

• There is very little contrast with other creative business people, except Walt Disney and later Pixar.

• Expect to be expected remember the most obscure Hensen work.

• The author unmistakably considers "Artists" to be a higher quality of person.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Marvel Comics

  • The Untold Story
  • By: Sean Howe
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 17 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 853
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 779
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 776

Throughout this decades-long journey to becoming a multibillion-dollar enterprise, Marvel's identity has continually shifted, careening between scrappy underdog and corporate behemoth. As the company has weathered Wall Street machinations, Hollywood failures, and the collapse of the comic book market, its characters have been passed along among generations of editors, artists, and writers - also known as the celebrated Marvel "Bullpen".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It's as if this book was written for me!

  • By Greg on 03-15-13

If you are on this page, you will this book!!!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-13

If you have an interest in the Comic Book industry or Marvel in particular then this is a book I highly recommend. This book is well written and unbelievably well paced for a business/creative history. It is a consistently good read for the full 18 hours.

Worth Noting:

• The book evenly presents the history of marvel, so if you are strictly, only really interested in one or two particular periods then you may find yourself skipping chapters, but even so, it's still a solid pick up

• This book is not about the purchase by Disney, although you do get a solid understanding of previous ownership changes

• There is little or no Celebrity Gossip from the sets of the films

• If the book has a theme, it's the question of creative ownership and how it has been dealt with by countless people from Jack and Stan to Steve Gerber and Rob Liefeld.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • 50 Popular Beliefs That People Think Are True

  • By: Guy P. Harrison
  • Narrated by: Erik Synnestvedt
  • Length: 13 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 97
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 83
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 82

Maybe you know someone who swears by the reliability of psychics or who is in regular contact with angels. Or perhaps you're trying to find a nice way of dissuading someone from wasting money on a homeopathy cure. How do you find a gently persuasive way of steering people away from unfounded beliefs, bogus cures, conspiracy theories, and the like? Longtime skeptic Guy P. Harrison shows you how in this down-to-earth, entertaining exploration of commonly held extraordinary claims.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Skepticism, so Dull & Condescending

  • By Mr Conway on 03-11-13

Skepticism, so Dull & Condescending

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-13

Neither a book for the fun-poking skeptic, nor the agnostic, or even the believer. The author fills his pages with a shockingly dull approach, given the book's fun subject matter. If this dry narrative wasn't bad enough, the author indulges in endless Condescension, NOT Smugness with all the fun that word implies, but the Condescension one expects from a long tenured grade-school teacher. This was so bad that I became so convinced that the publishers forced the writer to include a "How to enlighten people, without talking down" section at the end of each chapter which some times, some how, manages to be worse then the proceeding discussion.

(For the record, I'm a huge fan of Dawkins and Hitchen's books on Atheism. I love books on Skepticism.)

Regardless of which side of the fence you sit on, this book will leave you questioning your own decision making ability, but not for the reasons the author hopes.

14 of 19 people found this review helpful

  • That's Not What I Meant

  • The Sociolinguistics of Everyday Conversation - The Modern Scholar
  • By: Professor Deborah Tannen
  • Narrated by: Deborah Tannen
  • Length: 7 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 116
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 71

The following series of lectures draws on linguistics, or the scientific study of language, to show the many ways in which language has a profound effect upon human relationships. These lectures address the various aspects and implications of what Professor Tannen calls "conversational style". It also looks at the dynamics of specific situations such as the workplace and classroom where the role of conversational style is of particular importance.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Helpful Perceptions, not Scienctic Study

  • By Mr Conway on 08-17-12

Helpful Perceptions, not Scienctic Study

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-17-12

This is not a book about science, rather it's a book about perceptions. Where this book is presented as Scholarly lecture series it implies that it should be treated as having a basis in factual reality, but this is not what you are receiving. While the work begins with descriptive terms and possible scientific approaches to Sociolinguistics, the lectures work much better as self-help.

The author goes through a variety of elements of conversation which may allow the listener to improve their personal relationships with those around them through adjustments in the speech or by recognizing those issues of others.Those seeking scientific scholarship will be disappointed, those seeking an introduction to Social Linguistics in a non-scientific vocabulary will really enjoy.


The Modern Scholar: He Said/She Said: Women, Men and Language, also by Deborah Tannen, is VERY similar to this series. I would not recommend purchasing both.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45

  • By: Barbara W. Tuchman
  • Narrated by: Pam Ward
  • Length: 29 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 219
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 164
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163

In this Pulitzer Prize - winning biography, Barbara Tuchman explores American relations with China through the experiences of one of our men on the ground. In the cantankerous but level-headed "Vinegar Joe", Tuchman found a subject who allowed her to perform, in the words of the National Review, "one of the historian's most envied magic acts: conjoining a fine biography of a man with a fascinating epic story."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A period that directly affected our world today

  • By Charlotte on 08-29-12

Missing the Forest, Bogged Down in the Trees

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-12

I am a great admirer of Barbara Tuchman, having previously read most of her books on Audible, so I was very much looking forward to this Pulitzer Prize winning work, but I found only disappointment.

Unlike her other works, I felt that Ms. Tuchman lost perspective on the greater narrative by getting caught up in smaller matters of concern. Too often we find ourselves repeating the same problems again and again with "Peanut" or other issues. We bypass opportunities to effectively communicate the key relationships, choosing instead to illustrate our subject's frustrations with repetition.

I think the source of the problem is the author's access to General's Diary. She clearly greatly enjoyed reading it, and too often falls into the trap of merely re-writing it.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The End of Poverty

  • By: Jeffrey Sachs
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Hilgartner
  • Length: 13 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 162
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 88

This landmark exploration of prosperity and poverty distills the life work of an economist Time calls one of the world's 100 most influential people. Sachs's aim is nothing less than to deliver a big picture of how societies emerge from poverty. To do so he takes listeners in his footsteps, explaining his work in Bolivia, Russia, India, China, and Africa.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A Call for Africa

  • By Mr Conway on 08-03-12

A Call for Africa

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-12

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

An acceptable book that often moves back and forth from Economics to a call to pressure those in power to increase funding for the third world, but don't be fooled, the latter is very much the point of the book.

If you are a fan of Noam Chomsky you'll love this book, if you are a fan of Economics, but have a socially conscious perspective then read Muhammad Yunus instead.

The foreword is by Bono, so while you may be in the deep end, you certainly know which pool you are jumping into.

What didn’t you like about Malcolm Hilgartner’s performance?

There are some editing mistakes which is why I gave such a low score for performance, but otherwise the book is fine.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Origins of Political Order: From Prehuman Times to the French Revolution

  • By: Francis Fukuyama
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 22 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,974
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,710
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,692

Virtually all human societies were once organized tribally, yet over time most developed new political institutions which included a central state that could keep the peace and uniform laws that applied to all citizens. Some went on to create governments that were accountable to their constituents. We take these institutions for granted, but they are absent or are unable to perform in many of today’s developing countries—with often disastrous consequences for the rest of the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best Summary of Political History I've Read

  • By blah on 05-12-13

The best political history I've ever read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-24-12

I have only good things to say about this book and it's narration. Fukuyama sets out to write a history of Political order and the developments of the core parts of the state and achieves this goal definitively.

I thought the pace was excellent, as was the narrative progression. It moved freely yet logically between the micro and the macro perspectives. It even manages aptly walk the line between too much and too little background information for the various topics, institutions and regions, which could not have been easy given the subject's breadth.

For me, this was one of the books that subtly adjust my understanding of not just the subject matter on the page, but also of a range of other areas and disciplines as well.

I HIghly recommend this book to anyone interested in Politics, History, or virtually any other area of Non-Fiction.

42 of 48 people found this review helpful

  • Keynes Hayek

  • The Clash That Defined Modern Economics
  • By: Nicholas Wapshott
  • Narrated by: Gildart Jackson
  • Length: 11 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 256
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 209
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 212

As the stock market crash of 1929 plunged the world into turmoil, two men emerged with competing claims on how to restore the balance to economies gone awry. John Maynard Keynes, the mercurial Cambridge economist, believed that government had a duty to spend when others would not. He met his opposite in a little-known Austrian economics professor, Friedrich Hayek, who considered attempts to intervene both pointless and potentially dangerous.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An unbiased evaluation of both the major economist

  • By Anand on 03-17-12

Sometimes Dry or Mild, but always Interesting

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-12

An interesting read, but perhaps CLASH was the wrong word.

The story of two giants of their time, but the book is far more a history then a compelling story. Not high marks, yet if this subject matter is in your realm of interests I would recommend it, if you are new to economics then wishlist for later.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Blind Side

  • Evolution of a Game
  • By: Michael Lewis
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 11 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,091
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 594
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 598

When we first meet the young man at the center of this extraordinary and moving story, he is one of 13 children by a mother addicted to crack; he does not know his real name, his father, his birthday, or any of the things a child might learn in school. And he has no serious experience playing organized football.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Touching and Informative

  • By Chris on 10-12-09

A Mediocre story without an Ending

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-12

This book can be taken as a character study of good people thrown into an unusual situation, or as a book for Grid Iron 101 or perhaps even an introduction into the world of Collage Football politics in the US. But it doesn't really accomplish any of these goals well, and instead feels like a collection or articles and essays strung together by a less then compelling narrative.

Read Moneyball by Michael Lewis instead, which is similar in style and approach, but altogether MUCH stronger in execution.