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  • Fingerprints of the Gods

  • The Quest Continues
  • By: Graham Hancock
  • Narrated by: Graham Hancock
  • Length: 18 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,053
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,872
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,858

Fingerprints of the Gods is the revolutionary rewrite of history that has persuaded millions of listeners throughout the world to change their preconceptions about the history behind modern society. An intellectual detective story, this unique history audiobook directs probing questions at orthodox history, presenting disturbing new evidence that historians have tried - but failed - to explain.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book with excellent narration!

  • By Linda SB on 10-27-16

Difficult Audio Book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-18-17

Lots of numbers and data which is difficult to absorb via audio. At times it sounded like Carl Sagan saying "billions and billions and billions" and so on. Hancock's narrations also left something to be desired. His pronunciation of the letter A in mostly any word comes out AW. cAWveAWt (caveat), AWpple (apple)… that sort of thing. At first his weird pronunciation of A and other syllables was just a mild oddity but after the length of this book became a mild annoyance.

To the content, the book had some very interesting points to make and has sparked my imagination about human "pre-history". Hancock gets to these points, at times, in a very circuitous fashion that can try the listener's patience. The book needed more discipline and editing.

In the right format, and I'm thinking mini series, it would be successful. Graphics, charts, artist's renditions, and photos would help keep the vast array of information more coherent and accessible.

To summarize, kudos to Hancock for organizing all this information and crunching all these numbers, but handing it over to a good editor before publishing would have benefitted all IMO. A better narrator would improve the audio version as well.

0 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

  • A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life
  • By: Mark Manson
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 5 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108,503
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95,138
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94,609

For decades we've been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F*ck positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let's be honest, shit is f*cked, and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn't sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is - a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is his antidote to the coddling, let's-all-feel-good mind-set that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A book for 20-somethings, but not me

  • By Bonny on 09-22-16

Written for a Certain Age

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-17

Though there were some interesting points made by Manson but, to me, it is clearly intended for younger people. Speaking as a 61 year old, I have largely come to many of the same conclusions the author has and most references to our collective narciscism don't ring a bell in my head. The expressions "If only I knew then what I know now" and "youth is wasted on the young" come to mind.

Probably a better read for 20-40 year olds who spend a lot of time on their cell phones and social media.

  • A Great Reckoning

  • A Novel
  • By: Louise Penny
  • Narrated by: Robert Bathurst
  • Length: 13 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,234
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,818
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,793

When an intricate old map is found stuffed into the walls of the bistro in Three Pines, it at first seems no more than a curiosity. But the closer the villagers look, the stranger it becomes. Given to Armand Gamache as a gift the first day of his new job, the map eventually leads him to shattering secrets. To an old friend and older adversary. It leads the former Chief of Homicide for the Sûreté du Québec to places even he is afraid to go. But must. And there he finds four young cadets in the Sûreté academy, and a dead professor. And, with the body, a copy of the old, odd map.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Return to Three Pines

  • By Lisa K. Dillon on 09-05-16

Not For Me

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-17

Clearly this book is admired, based on the many positive reviews, but not by me.
For a murder mystery it fails to build any tension. At times I had a difficult time determining if it was the writing, or the narration, or an unfortunate combination of both that lent a flip and breezy and lightweight feeling to this novel.

Too many cocoas and croissants and omelets and cozy fires and community kumbaya. Please don't be offended ladies but this is a book written by a woman for women. The narrator, at times, sounded like George of the Jungle's ape doing an impression of Ronald Coleman. This book was also too long and took us down bunny paths that were mostly irrelevant. It was never explained what exactly made the cadets so special. In fact they seemed rather mediocre, even obnoxious. If your looking for a suspense novel, keep looking.

  • The Gray Man

  • By: Mark Greaney
  • Narrated by: Jay Snyder
  • Length: 11 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,057
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,256
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,226

Court Gentry is known as The Gray Man - a legend in the covert realm, moving silently from job to job, accomplishing the impossible, and then fading away. And he always hits his target. But there are forces more lethal than Gentry in the world. And in their eyes, Gentry has just outlived his usefulness. Now, he is going to prove that for him, there's no gray area between killing for a living-and killing to stay alive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Move Over Jack Reacher

  • By Ed on 03-25-17

Batman Has Nothing on This Guy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-20-16

This is your typical super hero / assassin / champion of the weak / moralistic vanquisher of all bad people who come for him. I've seen this before from Child, Berenson, Flynn and others. Greaney's Gray Man is crazy over the top however, to the degree it takes on a comic book aspect which was a little too much for me. I like my characters operating within the physical world I understand.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dust and Glory

  • By: Evan Green
  • Narrated by: Humphrey Bower
  • Length: 22 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 90
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 92

The world's toughest car race. Twenty-one days of searing heat and rock-hard desert tracks; of blowouts and breakdowns; of subterfuge and sabotage. Ten thousand miles of dust and glory. Driving at breakneck speed over Australia's roughest roads and through the most appalling conditions imaginable, six competitors break free from the pack and fight for the lead, gradually finding themselves entangled in a web of deceit, betrayal and danger. Dust and Glory is best-selling author Evan Green's stirring account of the most grueling race of them all.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great adventure!

  • By Boysmom on 07-21-15

Cheers to Humphrey Bower!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-15

This audio book would have suffered immensely had not a narrator of Humphrey Bower's talent read it.

The naivety of the main characters became a bit of a grind. Ridiculous really. After ALL the mishaps and shady characters lurking about, most plodded along in ignorant bliss. The way luck ALWAYS befell the protagonists was a little childish as well. Moral of the story was that good guys prevail and bad guys are buffoons and plagued with misfortune. All delivered with the subtlety of a sledge hammer.

The story certainly had it's moments in spite of a constant repetition of calamitous scenarios, but again, would have been a bore without Humphrey Bower's brilliant narration.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl on the Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Paula Hawkins
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett, Louise Brealey, India Fisher
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133,213
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117,645
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117,521

Audie Award, Audiobook of the Year, 2016. Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Psychological Thriller Mystery

  • By Victor @ theAudiobookBlog on 01-23-18

Immensely Overrated

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-15

The number of, and positive ranking of, the reviews for this book leave me puzzled.
The characters, generally, are very unlikable. The main protagonist is a raging alcoholic, a whore, a chronic liar, and is consistent in that she can be counted on to use incredibly poor judgment. Oh, and her favorite expression is "I'm sorry", of which she states a thousand times.

The women portrayed in this book are snarky, conniving, insulting, disloyal, and calculating. Or all of the above. The one thing they have in common is that their lives are somehow dissatisfying and it's a man's fault.

In the end, the writer has you focus on the despicable character of "Tom" leading the reader away from the fact that ALL the main characters are despicable. There is no victor here, no one to cheer for. Overall, quite depressing.

Oh yeah, the narration was good.

  • Chiefs

  • By: Stuart Woods
  • Narrated by: Mark Hammer
  • Length: 17 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,240
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,496
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,489

In 1919, Delano, Georgia, appoints its first chief of police. Honest and hardworking, the new chief is puzzled when young men start to disappear. But his investigation is ended by the fatal blast from a shotgun. Delano's second chief-of-police is no hero, yet he is also disturbed by what he sees in the missing-persons bulletins. In 1969, when Delano's third chief takes over, the unsolved disappearances still haunt the police files.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • In my 'Top Ten' books of all time!

  • By karen on 09-17-13

I'm Not as Enthusiastic as Some

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-14

It's about a 13 (maybe 14) hour book that takes 17 hours to complete due to a VERY slow reading pace. At times the narrator is heard clearing his throat or licking his lips, so somewhat poor marks for production. The accents of FDR and women were just silly.

To the story… plays on the usual small southern town stereotypes, and probably accurately. It became quite predictable how it was all going to wrap up, but that's not unusual either, read: John Grisham.

Overall, an OK story with an OK reader. So, just OK.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Closers: Harry Bosch Series, Book 11

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Len Cariou
  • Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,830
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,141

In Los Angeles in 1988, a 16-year-old girl disappeared from her home and was later found dead of a gunshot wound to the chest. The death appeared at first to be a suicide, but some of the evidence contradicted that scenario, and detectives came to believe this was in fact a murder. Despite a by-the-book investigation, no one was ever charged.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Thoroughly enjoyable.....

  • By Wheelman on 12-30-06

Hey, It's Connelly

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-14

Like all of Connelly's work, it's about the ride and not the destination. You should know the latter if you've read (listened) to him before. Still, pretty good writing, good narration, and being an LA boy, fun references. Good beach or vacation book.

  • The Bully Pulpit

  • Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism
  • By: Doris Kearns Goodwin
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 36 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,861
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,601
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,595

Goodwin describes the broken friendship between Teddy Roosevelt and his chosen successor, William Howard Taft. With the help of the "muckraking" press, Roosevelt had wielded the Bully Pulpit to challenge and triumph over abusive monopolies, political bosses, and corrupting money brokers. Roosevelt led a revolution that he bequeathed to Taft only to see it compromised as Taft surrendered to money men and big business. The rupture led Roosevelt to run against Taft for president, an ultimately futile race that gave power away to the Democrats.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Makes You Forget You Live in the 21st Century Good

  • By Cynthia on 01-11-14

A Bit Too Much of a Love Story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-14

Lot's of flowery exchanges, with too much focus on interpersonal relationships. Some of this would have been OK but the book seemed to drag on at times and at times felt like I was listening to the same passage over again. By reducing this component and adding a bit more about the issues of the day and the challenges they presented the book would improve IMO.

Edward Herman is a good narrator generally, but in this case was the wrong choice IMO.
His cadence and tone exacerbated the problem of the excessive gushing letters and memoirs.

This took longer to get through than most, for me, and I never really looked forward to the listen.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • 11-22-63

  • A Novel
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Craig Wasson
  • Length: 30 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50,764
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46,171
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46,080

On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back? In this brilliantly conceived tour de force, Stephen King - who has absorbed the social, political, and popular culture of his generation more imaginatively and thoroughly than any other writer - takes listeners on an incredible journey into the past and the possibility of altering it.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • A Piece of Genuine Crap

  • By Amazon Customer on 06-12-17

Too Long and a Bit Over-rated

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-11

Started strong but the middle of the book got drug down in a love story with fairly sappy dialog. About a fourth of this book could have been tossed and the result would have been a story with far more pace and tension. None of this is particularly unusual for King as he has often been accused of being paid by the word.

I found the end to be somewhat clunky as well. The "geologic" issues didn't make any sense and, frankly, was little insulting to the listener/reader after this tome.

The reviews here on Audible for 11-22-63 I find to be somewhat over-rated. It's just OK IMO. I've been through most of King's works and am a fan of his best stuff but he has certainly had his clunkers. This work is dangerously close to being in that latter category.

Lastly, Craig Wasson's narration is just excellent and I believe is largely responsible for this audio book being as well received as it is.

5 of 15 people found this review helpful