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  • Lord of Chaos

  • Book Six of The Wheel of Time
  • By: Robert Jordan
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading, Michael Kramer
  • Length: 41 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,844
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 13,926
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,906

As the Wheel turns, the winds of fate roil across the land. Rand al 'Thor struggles to unite the nations for the Last Battle when the Dark One will break free into the world to spring the snares laid by the immortal Forsaken for unwary humankind. The White Tower in Tar Valon, under the Amyrlin Elaida, has decided that Rand must be controlled immediately.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Finally here!

  • By Elias on 08-14-05

If you're already this far...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-21-18

As always, the narrators were fantastic. As far as the story goes, it was mostly set up and foreshadowing. There were a few significant plot advances, but for the most part, it was all talk and little action. The final chapter makes up for any lack of excitement, and the overall story arc is still intriguing, but this particular book is like an episode of Lost: it raises more questions than it answers.

  • The Great Hunt

  • Book Two of The Wheel Of Time
  • By: Robert Jordan
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading, Michael Kramer
  • Length: 26 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,036
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 17,186
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,201

The Wheel of Time turns and ages come and go, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the age that gave it birth returns again. For centuries, gleemen have told the tales of The Great Hunt of the Horn. So many tales about each of the Hunters, and so many Hunters to tell of. Now, the Horn itself is found: the Horn of Valere long thought only legend, the Horn which will raise the dead heroes of the ages.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Even better than the first!

  • By So Fain on 04-24-10

Much better than the first!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-18

First off, this is my favorite narrating team, great job! Secondly, this is a great story that is really starting to come into it's own. The first one seemed to borrow A LOT from Tolkien and didn't really bother hiding it. This installment promises great things for the rest of the series. If you read the first one and were on the fence, like me, definitely continue!

  • The Eye of the World

  • Book One of The Wheel of Time
  • By: Robert Jordan
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading, Michael Kramer
  • Length: 29 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,969
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,542
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,561

When their village is attacked by trollocs, monsters thought to be only legends, three young men, Rand, Matt, and Perrin, flee in the company of the Lady Moiraine, a sinister visitor of unsuspected powers. Thus begins an epic adventure set in a world of wonders and horror, where what was, what will be, and what is, may yet fall under the Shadow.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Your first step down a very long and winding road.

  • By Lore on 06-29-12

Finally started series, unimpressed

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-18

Okay, no spoilers, but this book is like a Lord of the Rings rewrite, Frodo is there, Stryder, a female Gandalf, there's even a shadowy character that pursues then through the equivalent of the Lines of Moria. There's am Ent character that makes an appearance, there's shone nods to The Hobbit, as well. Don't get me wrong, it's a good story, but it's not that original, especially in the fantasy genre of What Would Tolkien Do? I know there are thirteen more, so it can't be poached Rings throughout. I really like the narrators, so I'm going to keep thing with this series and would honestly recommend it, but not to anyone with high expectation.

  • The Bands of Mourning

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 14 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 14,009
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 13,020
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,985

The Bands of Mourning are the mythical metalminds owned by the Lord Ruler, said to grant anyone who wears them the powers that the Lord Ruler had at his command. Hardly anyone thinks they really exist. A kandra researcher has returned to Elendel with images that seem to depict the Bands as well as writings in a language that no one can read. Waxillium Ladrian is recruited to travel south to the city of New Seran to investigate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wax and Wayne are Back!!!

  • By Don Gilbert on 01-28-16

Better than previous installments

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-18

While the plot and characters are still mediocre detective novel fare, Sanderson as begun to bring Mistborn Era 2 back to the original mythology and explore the hidden backstory in more depth, something that's been missing from the previous Wax and Wayne installments. I think the Stormlight books really eclipsed the newer Mistborn saga, so it will be interesting to see where Sanderson will go next, but if you've enjoyed either series, Bands of Mourning will definitely keep you going. As always, Kramer's reading is superb.

  • Shadows of Self

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,061
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 14,888
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,863

With The Alloy of Law, Brandon Sanderson surprised listeners with a New York Times best-selling spinoff of his Mistborn audiobooks, set after the action of the trilogy, in a period corresponding to late 19th-century America. The trilogy's heroes are now figures of myth and legend, even objects of religious veneration. They are succeeded by wonderful new characters, chief among them Waxillium Ladrian, known as Wax, hereditary lord of House Ladrian.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thankfully "Mistborn" Continues

  • By Don Gilbert on 10-09-15

Fun, But A Little Obvious

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-27-18

I don't know if anyone has read the Hangman's Daughter books, but this reminded me of them: there's always some mystery to resolve and the reader is able to figure it out long before the characters because the obvious plot elements stand out like a sore thumb in the author's relatively simple narrative. Maybe I'm just too smart or maybe it's because these are shorter stories, but Sanderson's second Mistborn series, like the Hangman's Daughter books, doesn't have the depth and scope of the original Mistborn trilogy.

  • The Shadow of What Was Lost

  • The Licanius Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: James Islington
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 25 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,193
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,230
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,193

It has been 20 years since the end of the war. The dictatorial Augurs, once thought of almost as gods, were overthrown and wiped out during the conflict, their much-feared powers mysteriously failing them. Those who had ruled under them, men and women with a lesser ability known as the Gift, avoided the Augurs' fate only by submitting themselves to the rebellion's Four Tenets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Definitely a standout in the fantasy genre

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-29-15

Entertaining, if not wholly original

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-23-18

I don't think he was influenced by Sanderson nearly as much as he "borrowed" from him. Without going into any spoilers, fans of Sanderson's Mistborn series will see a lot of similarities, as well as a few things plucked from Warbreaker and the Stormlight series. And what's with the constant repetition of characters "inclining their heads?" You can't occasionally say "nod?" I counted four times in one chapter that the exact same expression gets used.

But the narrator, Michael Kramer, as always does a great job. The story is enjoyable, even if you've heard it all before.

  • Island

  • By: Aldous Huxley
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 11 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 892
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 807
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 802

In his final novel - which he considered his most important - Aldous Huxley transports us to the remote Pacific island of Pala, where an ideal society has flourished for 120 years. Inevitably, this island of bliss attracts the envy and enmity of the surrounding world. A conspiracy is underway to take over Pala, and events are set in motion when an agent of the conspirators, a newspaperman named Faranby, is shipwrecked there. What Faranby doesn't expect is how his time with the people of Pala will revolutionize all his values and - to his amazement - give him hope.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great narration for a great book.

  • By AndrewL on 09-21-16

A great reading if you're already a fan

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-17-18

Bereft of a plot, this is a bare bones utopian novel. Basically, the main character just visits one part of the island after another to hear a series of sermons, lectures, and dissertations. The narrator, Simon Vance, adequately divides up the different speakers, but the philosophy remains the same throughout. Like Huxley's dystopian counterpart, Brave New World, many of the examples have modern day corrolaries, as well as many plights that haven't changed at all, so the message still rings true.

  • Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

  • By: Neil deGrasse Tyson
  • Narrated by: Neil deGrasse Tyson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,355
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 21,819
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,627

What is the nature of space and time? How do we fit within the universe? How does the universe fit within us? There's no better guide through these mind-expanding questions than acclaimed astrophysicist and best-selling author Neil deGrasse Tyson. But today, few of us have time to contemplate the cosmos. So Tyson brings the universe down to Earth succinctly and clearly, with sparkling wit, in digestible chapters consumable anytime and anywhere in your busy day.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome book for those new to astrophysics.

  • By TMort on 06-07-17

More Siddhartha than Sagan

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-18

Part science, part philosophy, wholly engaging. This narration by the author shows why Tyson is one of the greatest minds of our generation, not only because of the precision of his intellect, but for its application. Very informative and thought-provoking, but equally accessible and entertaining, this book should be in every person's library.

  • West Cork

  • By: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Narrated by: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23,617
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,097
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21,100

This much we do know: Sophie Toscan du Plantier was murdered days before Christmas in 1996, her broken body discovered at the edge of her property near the town of Schull in West Cork, Ireland. The rest remains a mystery. Gripping, yet ever elusive, join the real-life hunt for answers in the year’s first not-to-be-missed, true-crime series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • ENTERTAINING AND THOUGHT-PROVOKING

  • By Ann on 02-13-18

Chilling - Investigative Journalism at its Best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-18

I can't say anything about this that hasn't been said already by so many people, other than to inquire whether purchasing this gets me access to future podcasts that are certainly to come!

  • Ikigai

  • The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life
  • By: Héctor García, Francesc Miralles
  • Narrated by: Walter Dixon
  • Length: 3 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,161
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,037
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,030

Bring meaning and joy to all your days with this internationally best-selling guide to the Japanese concept of ikigai - the happiness of always being busy - as revealed by the daily habits of the world's longest-living people.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not insightful but inspirational

  • By A. Yoshida on 02-27-18

Very informative, but lots of "filler"

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-18

This was a good read, especially where they delve directly into ikigai, but it seems like the authors were stretching for extra material to flesh out a three hour audio book. Chatter 8 is all about different yoga and tai chi poses, which doesn't really match the narrative time and is completely skipable.