LISTENER

Abbas

  • 42
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 49
  • ratings
  • Churchill

  • By: Roy Jenkins
  • Narrated by: Robert Whitfield
  • Length: 38 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 687
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 354
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 351

In this magisterial book, Roy Jenkins' unparalleled command of the political history of Britain and his own high-level government experience combine in a narrative account of Churchill's astounding career that is unmatched in its shrewd insights, its unforgettable anecdotes, the clarity of its overarching themes, and the author's nuanced appreciation of his extraordinary subject.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best of British Political Soap Opera

  • By K. Ray on 12-15-02

Quite a figure

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-19

There is not much to say about this book. It is really good, quite detailed and very very long.

  • Why Nations Fail

  • The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty
  • By: Daron Acemoglu, James Robinson
  • Narrated by: Dan Woren
  • Length: 17 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,244
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,907
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,905

Brilliant and engagingly written, Why Nations Fail answers the question that has stumped the experts for centuries: Why are some nations rich and others poor, divided by wealth and poverty, health and sickness, food and famine?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Pros and Cons of "Why Nations Fail"

  • By Joshua Kim on 05-01-12

Excellent book indeed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-18

This book was quite elaborate and filled with examples. It presented its arguments, counter arguments and gave many examples on both. It's quite enlightening in that it shows what the world looks like to the people & the government. One thing I didn't like is that this book somewhat dismissed the arguments from "Guns Germs & Steel" quickly without giving it enough place for discussion. It was an enjoyable and informative experience.

  • The Blind Watchmaker

  • Why the Evidence of Evolution Reveals a Universe Without Design
  • By: Richard Dawkins
  • Narrated by: Richard Dawkins, Lalla Ward
  • Length: 14 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,001
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,734
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,708

The Blind Watchmaker, knowledgably narrated by author Richard Dawkins, is as prescient and timely a book as ever. The watchmaker belongs to the 18th-century theologian William Paley, who argued that just as a watch is too complicated and functional to have sprung into existence by accident, so too must all living things, with their far greater complexity, be purposefully designed. Charles Darwin's brilliant discovery challenged the creationist arguments; but only Richard Dawkins could have written this elegant riposte.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Challenging textbook more than an enjoyable listen

  • By Eric on 01-15-12

Quite a listen.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-18

Absolutely loved it. In the words of a student of the author's "gees this Evolution thing really makes sense". The way the author presents his arguments and counter arguments appear slightly aggressive but quite accurate. One important thing I learned from this book *SPOILER ALERT* is that Genes are a recepie for making living organisms not a blueprint of their structure. If only more people would take time and listen/read this book many of the controversies on Evolution by Natural Selection would be resolved.

  • Guns, Germs and Steel

  • The Fate of Human Societies
  • By: Jared Diamond
  • Narrated by: Doug Ordunio
  • Length: 16 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,921
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5,109
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,101

Having done field work in New Guinea for more than 30 years, Jared Diamond presents the geographical and ecological factors that have shaped the modern world. From the viewpoint of an evolutionary biologist, he highlights the broadest movements both literal and conceptual on every continent since the Ice Age, and examines societal advances such as writing, religion, government, and technology.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A story all should know, not all can endure

  • By Daniel on 12-19-11

And this is why the world is the way it is.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-18

Just marvelous how this book presents its ideas. The arguments made in this book can be judged critically, which is what the author did, he presented the historical evidence and inferred the argument from it. The information stated in this book is quite important in the understanding of the evolution of human society and civilization.

  • The Ghost Map

  • By: Steven Johnson
  • Narrated by: Alan Sklar
  • Length: 8 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 870
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 564
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 563

This is a thrilling historical account of the worst cholera outbreak in Victorian London and a brilliant exploration of how Dr. John Snow's solution revolutionized the way we think about disease, cities, science, and the modern world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding

  • By Cheryl Crane on 01-14-07

This book is a must.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

Great ideas are discussed here. Slowly but in a powerful manner has the author presented the case of Cholera outbreaks in London and how were they managed. It is a great example of how change doesn't come abruptly, but progresses slowly.

  • A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts

  • By: Andrew Chaikin
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 23 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,717
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,533
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,521

Audie Award, History/Biography, 2016. On the night of July 20, 1969, our world changed forever when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. Based on in-depth interviews with 23 of the 24 moon voyagers, as well as those who struggled to get the program moving, A Man on the Moon conveys every aspect of the Apollo missions with breathtaking immediacy and stunning detail.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Long, comforting book on moon exploration

  • By Mark on 06-17-16

One small Book for man one great Story for mankind

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-18

Listening to this book was both a joyful & an informative experience. It can be seen from the text that the author did justice to the people at the Apollo Program by describing the work and effort they put to have the missions going.
The thing that annoyed me in this book is the lack of clarity when transitioning from one mission to the other. I will only realise that the context is about the next mission a while after it started.
This was a good experience.

  • Mastery

  • By: Robert Greene
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 16 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,291
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,317
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,291

What did Charles Darwin, middling schoolboy and underachieving second son, do to become one of the earliest and greatest naturalists the world has known? What were the similar choices made by Mozart and by Caesar Rodriguez, the U.S. Air Force's last ace fighter pilot? In Mastery, Robert Greene's fifth book, he mines the biographies of great historical figures for clues about gaining control over our own lives and destinies. Picking up where The 48 Laws of Power left off, Greene culls years of research and original interviews to blend historical anecdote and psychological insight, distilling the universal ingredients of the world's masters.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Focus on passion=Less stress and more success

  • By Mark on 05-04-15

Exemplary

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-18

This was a pleasant and hopeful experience. The book analyses masters throughout history, breakdown their lifes in a way to show how they became celebrities of their fields. It gives one hope in the form of "I can do it, and now I know how". One thing I disliked in the writing of the book is that it kept bringing the same stories each time with different angles, usually this is good but this book did it too much that it became annoying. This was a good listen.

  • You Are Now Less Dumb

  • How to Conquer Mob Mentality, How to Buy Happiness, and All the Other Ways to Outsmart Yourself
  • By: David McRaney
  • Narrated by: Don Hagen
  • Length: 8 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,366
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,213
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,210

You Are Now Less Dumb is grounded in the idea that we all believe ourselves to be objective observers of reality - except we’re not. But that's okay, because our delusions keep us sane. Expanding on this premise, McRaney provides eye-opening analyses of 15 more ways we fool ourselves every day. This smart and highly entertaining audiobook will be wowing listeners for years to come.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You really will be less dumb!

  • By Kim Drnec on 08-01-14

Ahh, This was good

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-29-18

McRaney & Hagen did it again. Amazing book, amazing writer and an amazing Narrator. Listening to this book was a great experience, both funny and informative in a way I think is crucial for everyone. More people need to know about the ideas discussed in this book for the good of society.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Bonobo and the Atheist

  • By: Frans de Waal
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 9 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 422
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 377
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 375

In this lively and illuminating discussion of his landmark research, esteemed primatologist Frans de Waal argues that human morality is not imposed from above but instead comes from within. Moral behavior does not begin and end with religion but is in fact a product of evolution. For many years, de Waal has observed chimpanzees soothe distressed neighbors and bonobos share their food. Now he delivers fascinating fresh evidence for the seeds of ethical behavior in primate societies that further cements the case for the biological origins of human fairness.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Less science and more meditative

  • By Lisa on 06-10-13

A delicious Fruit for Thought

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-23-18

I am amazed at how intruiging and thought provoking this book has been.

It discussion on morality & religion made me want to think about them more seriously than before.

It did however got me lost sometimes on the author's position on some arguments. It was a hell of a Rollercoaster of arguments and facts but quite enjoyable indeed.

  • Breaking the Spell

  • Religion as a Natural Phenomenon
  • By: Daniel C. Dennett
  • Narrated by: Dennis Holland
  • Length: 12 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 482
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 423
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 416

For all the thousands of books that have been written about religion, few until this one have attempted to examine it scientifically: to ask why - and how - it has shaped so many lives so strongly. Is religion a product of blind evolutionary instinct or rational choice? Is it truly the best way to live a moral life? Ranging through biology, history, and psychology, Daniel C. Dennett charts religion’s evolution from “wild” folk belief to “domesticated” dogma.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An excellent introduction to be origins of religion and belief

  • By sam on 02-29-16

Maybe we should break the spell

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-13-18

Quite an enjoyable and informative listen. Thid book tackles the subject with great sensitivity and accuracy. The book doesn't really talk about wether religion is correct or not but talks about why we should investigate that question in a broad manner. The arguments mentioned in this book should be delivered to all people to seek a better future.