LISTENER

Driftless Nana

  • 23
  • reviews
  • 52
  • helpful votes
  • 80
  • ratings
  • Skin

  • Insatiable Series, Book 1
  • By: Patrick Logan
  • Narrated by: Michael Pauley
  • Length: 9 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 173
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 157

Tucked away in northeastern Vermont, picturesque Askergan County is the perfect place for a winter vacation - for the lucky few who know about it. Askergan is so peaceful, crime so nonexistent, that they don't even have a full-time police force, just a Sheriff and two deputies who spend most of their time dishing out parking tickets and breaking up the occasional bar fight. But that was before the storm.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Will be haunted by that voice for days

  • By Julie Ann Sanchez on 10-11-16

Potentially Great Book ruined by two things

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-31-18

One of my pet peeves is a literary book written without good research. This is compounded when this ignorance is involved with a significant part of the plot.

Once I got fed up with this fact I found myself nit-picking and getting more and more annoyed. It’s only due to the interesting plot that I read as far as I did until I just quit in disgust.

Patrick Logan, I hope you read this review. You need to be educated. Your understanding of opioid addiction is wrong, wrong, wrong.

Nobody goes out in life to become a junkie on purpose. And they certainly, at least in most cases, use heroin to seek oblivion because they cannot handle real life. Here are a few incidents in the book that need to be corrected.

Heroin addicts are physically addicted to heroin. They cannot turn to any other drug for relief other than another opioid. They cannot just take something like Valium or ketamine (! which just tranquilizers humans) to make everything ok or to “take the edge off.” You cannot understand the torment of opiate withdrawal in your worst nightmares. People relapse because the opiate receptors in their brain, when not fulfilled, scream for relief.

A good amount of male junkies are impotent when high. This drug is the opposite of an aphrodisiac.

Junkies don’t release their bowels when overdosing. Heroin is constipating.

This addiction is not a sign of moral weakness. Junkies, when at rock bottom, live on the streets. It’s rare to find a squeamish junkie. Usually, once they get off, they can do just about anything they have to.

What’s with the language used in this part of the plot? “Don’t touch my heroin!” Really? Would an alcoholic say, “Don’t touch my malted grain alcohol?” A couple of calls to the narcotics division would have filled in my sch of your ignorance of slang.

Sigh.

Now this review is too long for much more. But this next error also bugs me. People don’t have to look at a wound or guess if it’s gangrenous. When my uncle was in the hospital with gangrene, you could smell it immediately you stepped out of the elevator

It’s good research that can distinguish between an okay-ish book and a really good one. You’re able to write a novel, which takes work. Don’t let laziness about research diminish your work.

OH! Also, what’s with the narrator? Does he hate the novelist or something? He sounds like he’s trying to imitate a robot’s monotonous voice. Really?

  • Faithful Traitor: The Story of Margaret Pole

  • Plantagenet Embers, Book 2
  • By: Samantha Wilcoxson
  • Narrated by: Rachael Beresford
  • Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7

Margaret Pole is no stranger to fortune's wheel. From her childhood as firstborn of the heir apparent of England, she was brought low as the daughter of a traitor. After years of turmoil as the Tudor dynasty made its roots, Margaret finds favor with her cousin, King Henry VIII. Will the remnant of the York dynasty thrive under this tempestuous king or will Margaret discover that there is a price to pay for having an excess of royal blood? Step into Tudor England....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fictional history with a lot of actual history

  • By Sandy Wilcoxson on 08-03-17

Pretty accurate and well written, but

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-24-17

As a European history buff, and with a long interest in the Tudor era, I confess to having high expectations when reading novels about this era. I’m pleased to say that Wilcoxson portrayed the era, including the attitudes and mores of the characters, very accurately.

I had not explored much of Margaret, Duchess if Salisbury’s, life before I read this book. Most of what I knew about her focused mainly on her birth Family, her role as Mary Tudor’s governess and her execution.

I found the novel quite interesting, despite the fact that much of the information about the Duchess’ adult life centered on her work trying to provide her children settled and stable situations in life as they reached adulthood.

Some scenes that I already knew about, such as Katherine Howard’s beautifully sympathetic kindness, were written in a way that brought new life to the event.

Unfortunately, the narrator began speaking mote and more slowly as the book went on. Further, her voice became more and more mournful, even when a tragic mood was uncalled for. It’s possible that she was trying to reflect Salisbury’s advancing age, but my 94-year old mother speaks more quickly than the narrator. This was a lengthy book to begin with, and it seems to me that the narrators frustrating drone must have added at least 2 hours to the recording.

It really is unfortunate, because the author obviously put much effort and diligence in creating a fine work of fiction, much of it spun from a small amount of information. But after a while I had to force myself to return to it because after a while listening to her voice was torturous.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Scary Rednecks & Other Inbred Horrors

  • By: Weston Ochse, David Whitman
  • Narrated by: Arnie Mazer
  • Length: 6 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 18

>Scary Rednecks collects 23 stories of horror, madness, and humor set in the rural south of America's heartland. The stories run the gamut from terror to outrageousness. Packed with everything from abusive parents, cannibals, deer hunters, demonic catfish, UFO abductions, voodoo priestesses, vampire moonshiners, and other Appalachian monstrosities, it will amuse you, disturb you, and leave you hungering for more.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Hey y'all, watch this!

  • By Driftless Nana on 06-22-17

Hey y'all, watch this!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-22-17

The reason I gave the book four stars is because the stories varied in quality. But for the most part, this book is a pleasure to listen to. From what I recall, most of these stories were just humorous. I can't particularly remember any scary ones, but it's been over a month since I listened to it. But it's definitely worth buying! I was sorry when it ended.

  • Bitter Greens

  • By: Kate Forsyth
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading
  • Length: 19 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 131
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 120
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 121

Charlotte-Rose has been banished from the court of Versailles by the Sun King, Louis XIV, after a series of scandalous love affairs. She is comforted by an old nun, Sister Seraphina, who tells her the tale of a young girl who, 100 years earlier, was sold by her parents for a handful of bitter greens. After Margherita's father steals from the walled garden of the courtesan Selena Leonelli, he is threatened with having both hands cut off unless he and his wife give away their little girl.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Rich, Dark and Fascinating

  • By Ilana on 01-08-15

Many Stories and Many Voices - Perfection!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-16

Because I always loved the story of Rapunzel (it was one of my Nana's bedtime stories), I was slightly nervous about purchasing this audiobook. How much can one draw out of a simple folk tale to make it interesting? Even though the idea of craving greens for a salad sounded enticing when I was young, my sole experiences of salad were centered around iceberg lettuce and prepared salad dressings.

As I grew older, of course, the tale only entered my mind every so often. The Disney movie certainly helped in that area. And after 7 full-term pregnancies (plus a few that ended earlier, alas), I completely understood the desperate need for a certain food prompted by pregnancy cravings.

But I had spent a credit on it, and it got good reviews, which of course is why I bought it in the first place. So a few weeks ago, when searching for a new audiobook to accompany my exercise, driving and household work, I decided to listen to it.

Because I was focusing on chopping vegetables at the time, I was a couple of minutes into the tale before what the narrator said really entered my brain. What's this? France during the reign of the Sun King? I looked down at my iPhone to make sure I had the right audiobook.

I must mention here that I have NEVER heard a narrator with the astounding skills of Kate Reading. Her last name is certainly fitting! Her English is impeccable. But she speaks French like a Parisian and Italian like a Venetian! I've never heard such a beautiful, buttery French before and her Italian had the delicate throatiness of a mezzo-soprano.

Trust me, I'm going to hunt down every audiobook Kate Reading narrates!

But back to the story. Each tale, which were all part of the same story, were written with such precise, rich prose that I almost experienced the book as if I were living it. I could almost feel the heat on my back as women worked in the garden, parts of the story reminded me of the passion I felt as an unmarried young woman and then, later, after I married my husband. I could thrill with every victory and nearly sob with every shameful defeat. At times I had to remind myself I was affected by the novel, when I was interrupted during a scene that drew my wrath. Plus, I myself had experienced cravings for the "bitter greens" which form the title of this book. During my 3rd pregnancy, I was chopping parsley and was so physically affected by a sudden powerful craving for it that I couldn't stop myself from grabbing a handful and cramming it into my mouth. It's a wonder we had any left for our salad.

One more note: I am an unprofessional historian, who has lately been drawn to the eras and countries which frame these stories. At no time did I find any red flags. Rather, as Ii said before, I felt sucked into the atmosphere of each environment when I encountered it as narrated by the genius of Kate Reading.

I wonder, does the fact that both author and narrator have the same first name affect the symbiosis I sensed between them?

  • The Windup Girl

  • By: Paolo Bacigalupi
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 19 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5,395
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,611
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,633

Anderson Lake is a company man, AgriGen's Calorie Man in Thailand. Under cover as a factory manager, Anderson combs Bangkok's street markets in search of foodstuffs thought to be extinct, hoping to reap the bounty of history's lost calories. There, he encounters Emiko...Emiko is the Windup Girl, a strange and beautiful creature. One of the New People, Emiko is not human; instead, she is an engineered being, creche-grown and programmed to satisfy the decadent whims of a Kyoto businessman.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Al Gore nightmare meets Blade Runner.

  • By Marius on 01-13-10

More of a Wind-ing Plot

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-16

Often when I have trouble fully understanding a novel, or when I have been distracted while listening to certain parts of it, I listen to it again. I will probably do that with this novel eventually. However, I felt that the structure of the novel included a great deal of information-driven plotline which was just too much. You can only listen to/read about corporate heads talking in offices before it just drags.

There seemed to be three viewpoints telling the story: Asian businessmen, an American businessman and the Windup Girl. The latter character is the most interesting part of the story, but she is brought in too late and described in sketchy, fragments of text. After a while I became very confused as to what had and what had not yet happened.

This is a shame. Because I can see a fabulous novel inside all of this extra "wrapping." The book is called The Windup Girl - therefore imo she should be the main part of the story - not thrown in willy-nilly as if her story is a side-plot.

If you are patient and do not mind searching for a few needles in a haystack, give it a try. I'm going to give it a second chance one of these days.

  • Katherine

  • A Novel
  • By: Anya Seton
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 23 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 973
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 861
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 856

Set in the vibrant 14th century of Chaucer and the Black Death, the classic romance Katherine features knights fighting in battle, serfs struggling in poverty, and the magnificent Plantagenets - Edward III, the Black Prince, and Richard II - who ruled despotically over a court rotten with intrigue. Within this era of danger and romance, John of Gaunt, the king's son, falls passionately in love with the already married Katherine.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • If you like Philippa Gregory's novels, try this!

  • By Gwynne O'Reagan on 04-22-12

What was Old is New Again.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-16

Sometimes I avoid old classics due to fear that I will be disappointed when I finally do read or listen to them. This rarely happens. In the case of this novel, I had the impression that it was written for young people. It wasn't until I read a review of a modern historical novel about Katherine Swynford in which the reviewer stated that Seton's Katherine was still the definitive novel written about Swynford.

I had always thought of Katherine Swynford as the Duchess of Lancaster, mother to kings. I imagined her as having high status in the court of Edward III. I was completely wrong. (Well, almost completely.)

In fact, the Duke of Lancaster (John of Gaunt), though the son of Edward III, attained the title due to his first wife - Blanche of Lancaster. Katherine was married to another knight, Hugh Swynford. Katherine and the Duke apparently began to fall in love while both of them were married to their first spouses. When Blanche died, the two of them acknowledged their feelings but held back until Hugh died. At this point the Duke had three children (?) and Katherine had two, the first, a daughter, named Blanche after the Duchess.

The two became lovers despite the fact that the Duke planned to marry Princess Constanza of Castile. Over several years, the two had four children, who were given the surname Beaufort. When Katherine and all their children were at the Savoy Palace, Richard was called away to battle overseas. The plan was for Katherine and the children to follow him to Orleans.

Unfortunately, Katherine and her oldest daughter were unable to leave with the rest of the family. During this time, a peasants' revolt, called the rising, ended with the deaths of many of the nobility and the utter destruction of the Savoy. Catherine and her daughter became separated.

These events drove Katherine into religious fanatacism. Eventually she found peace and returned to the Swynford manor home, where she lived with her children. Various events kept John and Katherine separate, until they finally married and their children legitimized, By this time her children and his were grown. One of her daughters, named Joan, married Ralph Neville, a nobleman who couldn't marry her before due to her bastard status.. Her daughter, Cecily Neville, married Richard Plantagenet, the Duke of York.

Of John of Gaunt's three wives, were born three different royal dynasties: Blanche's son Henry, became Henry IV. Constanza's daughter, Catalina, married the Prince of Castile, and Katherine's descendants not only included Edward IV (York) but Henry Tudor (Lancaster - through Margaret Beaufort). Those representatives of the Red and White Roses were combined through marriage into the Tudor dynasty.

Even though this is a lot of information, I am only skimming the surface of this comprehesive, engrossing work.

I very, very highly recommend it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Summer of Night

  • By: Dan Simmons
  • Narrated by: Dan John Miller
  • Length: 22 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,883
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,727
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,730

It’s the summer of 1960 and in the small town of Elm Haven, Illinois, five twelve-year-old boys are forging the powerful bonds that a lifetime of change will not break. From sunset bike rides to shaded hiding places in the woods, the boys’ days are marked by all of the secrets and silences of an idyllic childhood. But amid the sun-drenched cornfields, their loyalty will be pitilessly tested.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Go Ahead...Take A Stroll Down Horror Lane

  • By Jan on 10-31-14

A Strong RIval of Stephen King's Best Work

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-07-16

Even though I was 2 years old in 1960 (the year in which Summer of Night is set), I found Simmons evocation of the summer vacations we baby-boomers enjoyed markedly similar to those we experienced in Texas during the 1960's. I think that, as children, we were able to enjoy the simplicity of those years in a way that people of other generations could not. We hung between the past and the future: we still played the games our parents did as children but the Space Age and the Beatles promised us futures filled with amazing, undreamed of lives to come.

Dan John Miller gives this book it's due. His ability to slip into a variety of characters of different gender, background and age is marvelous. He never gives the sense that this is his first time to see the book, the way some performers do. And when the text describes a character as coughing or laughing while speaking, etc., he does it in a most natural way, which can be difficult for some to do without being awkward.

Oh, Summer of Night is definitely a horror book. It is scary, scary, scary. But much of what makes it so effective are Simmons' characterizations, his almost poetic descriptions and the ability to twist several elements of horror stories into something completely new. It really can appeal to quite a large number of diverse readers.

Simmons immerses the reader into the setting of that summer in 1960 Illinois with his almost hypnotic use of prose. I felt that I could almost feel the summer heat, crawling up hot rocks barefoot, splashing into the local swimming hole and riding my bicycle over dusty, unpaved roads. He provides us with the atmosphere of iced lemonade, nights on front porch swings under yellow outdoor lights and the the ever-present song of summer insects such as cicadas and crickets. And, most importantly, the tightly bound friendships that children believe will last forever.

I want to take one paragraph to touch on the characters in the book. It is so easy to view them as real people that you might discover yourself loving some and hating some, and wishing you could have been there to help them. I am reading a book right now, Children of the Night, in which one of the boys plays a major role. It was delightful to see him as a grown up. I hope we get to see more.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Longbourn

  • By: Jo Baker
  • Narrated by: Emma Fielding
  • Length: 13 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,055
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 975
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 976

In this irresistibly imagined belowstairs answer to Pride and Prejudice, the servants take center stage. Sarah, the orphaned housemaid, spends her days scrubbing the laundry, polishing the floors, and emptying the chamber pots for the Bennet household. But there is just as much romance, heartbreak, and intrigue downstairs at Longbourn as there is upstairs. When a mysterious new footman arrives, the orderly realm of the servants’ hall threatens to be completely, perhaps irrevocably, upended.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Extraordinary book (even w/o Pride & Prejudice)

  • By MP on 10-13-13

Better than Pride and Prejudice!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-07-16

I'm making an audacious claim here. I know that it's virtually literary heresy to compare Jane Austen's work unfavorably with a modern novel. However . . .

I came to Longbourn expecting a rehashing of Austen's plot from the perspective of those "downstairs." I was very quickly disabused of this belief. Baker has created her own world of characters living their own independent lives which, now and then, intersect with that of the Bennet family.

Baker must have extensively researched the lives of all types of people during this era, and her ability of portray characters of various lifestyles during this period is uncanny. I am a voracious reader of biographies, diaries and journals, historical fiction and non-fiction. But it is rare that a historical novel, and more an audiobook, gave me the feeling that I was dipping into the lives of real people. Her prose, ad Fielding's interpretation of it, draws the reader in without feeling that it is contrived or overly poetic.

Don't get me wrong. I respect Jane Austen's work. I recognize her ability to reproduce the society in which she lived using fiction. And as an adult (I first read her books as a "teeny-bopper" in the very early 1970's) the consequences that come to foolish young girls are something I can relate to. More, as a parent, understand the turmoil when families are stretched between concern for the welfare of their daughters and fear of losing their social standing.

But all in all, I prefer Baker's re-interpretation of Austen's novel. If it can be called that. Because, when it comes down to brass tacks, Longbourn is only slightly related to Pride and Prejudice. It's much, much better.



.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • For Honor We Stand

  • Man of War, Book 2
  • By: H. Paul Honsinger
  • Narrated by: Ray Chase
  • Length: 14 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,374
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,269
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,274

In 2315, the Earth Union is losing a 30-year-long war with the Krag Hegemony. Having encountered the Krag before, Space Commander Max Robicheaux now faces daunting challenges aboard the USS Cumberland: The dangers from the enemy without…and clashes with crew and superiors within. Meanwhile, Doctor Sahin receives a coded message summoning him to a secret meeting which aims to forge an alliance that could change the balance of power in Known Space.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sing-song?

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-16-17

Narration drove me away

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-03-15

I greatly enjoyed reading the first book in this series on my Kindle. It provided me a with a strong background of the characters. Unfortunately, the narrator, even though he did perform the first book, didn't seem to understand the main characters at all. This distracted and irritated me so much that I stopped listening to it.

The narrator, in my opinion, dropped the ball with the voices he used for two of the main characters. First, the captain. Yes, the captain was described as having a deep, booming voice. But I don't think Honsinger saw the character as always shouting. This is a captain who, in the first book, is able to kindly work with young cadets - I mean young. I can't remember exactly, but I think they were about 9 or 10 years old. The youngsters are impressed and intimidated at first, but he gently and empathetically gives them a small lesson in knife weaponry which, at the end of the lesson leaves the young men awestruck and full of admiration for their captain. Unfortunately, the shouting voice used by the narrator was very distracting and deflated an interesting characterization into a shallow caricature.

This is also true for the voice he uses for the doctor. In fact, I found it even worse than the one he used for the captain. In the first book, the two men forge a bond of respect and beginning friendship. The doctor comes from an Islamic culture which, in my opinion, mirrors the golden age when art, science, mathematics, etc. were deeply explored. A time when Muslim doctors such as Avicenna were revolutionizing the art and science of medicine. The doctor is an interesting, intelligent man with an attractive personality.

Unfortunately, the narration of an interaction between the captain and the doctor leave the listener with the impression that the captain rightfully mistrusts and has no respect for him whatsoever. The doctor is characterized as a whining, sleazy coward.

This really skewed the way the story unfolded as I listened to it. In the end, I had to stop listening before I even finished Part 1. It's sad, because I find the books interesting and would enjoy listening to them. Well, thank G-d I have my Kindle.

  • The Fold

  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,816
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,829
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 27,782

The folks in Mike Erikson's small New England town would say he's just your average, everyday guy. And that's exactly how Mike likes it. Sure, the life he's chosen isn't much of a challenge to someone with his unique gifts, but he's content with his quiet and peaceful existence. That is, until an old friend presents him with an irresistible mystery, one that Mike is uniquely qualified to solve.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Fun premise, great performance, weak story

  • By J. Klinghoffer on 08-06-15

Clines Has Done it Again!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-15

When an author publishes a stand-out, exceptional novel I always wonder about what will happen next. Will they imitate Harper Lee and release nothing for several decades? Will they put out the same story set in a different time/place and with different characters? Will they be able to write a sequel? Or will they be able to pull off another fascinating story about something else?

Peter Clines not only was able to avoid the traps waiting ahead for his second book, but he not only wrote a grab-your-attention novel - "The Fold" is also a sleeper sequel. I find it magnificent.

The protagonist of this book is a man (I believe he's in his 30's). He is an unmarried high school English Literature teacher (and a very good one at that). The one person he is closest to is a childhood friend. A childhood friend who wields a great deal of government power and handles an amazing amount of money. A childhood friend who knows his innermost, deepest secret - he is a gifted genius with an eidetic memory.

What do I mean by this? Isn't the phrase "gifted genius" redundant? If you define "gifted" they way I do, it isn't. He is not only incredibly intelligent, but they way he thinks about problems or ideas is very different from the way most people think. He's not an autistic man, like Dustin Hoffman played in "Rainman," but the way he manages thought processes is somewhat similar to that character.

As I said before, also has an eidetic memory. Now, I always thought a person with an eidetic memory could remember certain things in certain categories in impeccable clarity. Not here. He perfectly remembers every event in his life from early childhood. How does he store all this information? It's a lot - he remembers every conversation, every face, every page of print he's only glanced at - it's all there, available to be pulled out and used.

I don't think I'm going to tell you that. I don't want to give out a lot of spoilers. All I'll tell you is that his childhood friend needs information about a project in which he has invested a large amount of government, as well as personal, money. He doesn't fully understand what it is they are doing out there in the western desert, and those working on the project aren't telling.

Enjoy!

3 of 7 people found this review helpful