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  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 99
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  • The Memory Stone, Part II

  • By: Jeffrey Quyle
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 18 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 167
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 156

Theus's journey continues in The Memory Stone, Part II. Within the past year of his life, Theus has seen freedom and slavery, affection and spite, wealth and poverty - now, his adventures are about to grow more consequential and intense as the gods of the land begin to rely on him personally and exclusively to travel from conflict to conflict, as they try to use him to tamp down the outbreak of evil and violence that is threatening every human in the lands ruled by Stoke.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • a good story, great performance

  • By Mikey on 05-13-18

Continuation of a fun, clean story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

TheMemoryStone

I am currently enjoying the second book in the series The Memory Stone by Jeffrey Quyle. Clean and enjoyable, this story follows the many adventures of Theus as he endeavors to combat evil and make sense of his newly found unique talents and magical abilities.

There is an aspect of romance in this book; however, it is not a lustful "romance". It is a romance truly born out of love and respect. That is one of the many reasons I like the book.

I also enjoy the book because a lot of the characters in the book are simply "good-people." Many times in books and movies the protagonist is one of only a few good people; he/she faces insurmountable odds against many ill-meaning and questionable characters. However, in this book, many of the characters are truly good-people. And, with the hostility in our society these days, it is simply refreshing to read a book with so many good-people in it.

There is a strong chance this series will be added to my favorites list. However, I will have to wait and see how the series ends.

Update 1/5/19: this series was added to my "favorites" list.

  • The Memory Stone

  • By: Jeffrey Quyle
  • Narrated by: Peter Kenny
  • Length: 20 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 269
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 250
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 251

Theus is sold into servanthood by his poverty-stricken family and taken by his kindly master on a journey across a continent, following the course of the Landwide River. From there, he begins to learn the secrets of the memory stones, the extraordinary objects that can store information for people.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining and enjoyable

  • By Consumer scientist on 02-07-18

Fun, Clean story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

I am currently enjoying the second book in the series The Memory Stone by Jeffrey Quyle. Clean and enjoyable, this story follows the many adventures of Theus as he endeavors to combat evil and make sense of his newly found unique talents and magical abilities.

There is an aspect of romance in this book; however, it is not a lustful "romance". It is a romance truly born out of love and respect. That is one of the many reasons I like the book.

I also enjoy the book because a lot of the characters in the book are simply "good-people." Many times in books and movies the protagonist is one of only a few good people; he/she faces insurmountable odds against many ill-meaning and questionable characters. However, in this book, many of the characters are truly good-people. And, with the hostility in our society these days, it is simply refreshing to read a book with so many good-people in it.

There is a strong chance this series will be added to my favorites list. However, I will have to wait and see how the series ends.

Update 1/5/19: this series was added to my "favorites" list.

  • Street Rats of Aramoor

  • Street Rats of Aramoor, Book 1
  • By: Michael Wisehart
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 16 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 661
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 631
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 629

Ayrion has been training to fight since he was old enough to walk. As far back as he can remember he’s always had one dream - to be the youngest warrior of his clan. Unfortunately, Ayrion learns the hard way that being the best isn't always a good thing. After a tragic accident rips away his dreams and leaves him without a home, Ayrion heads south to the capital city of Aramoor in hopes of starting a new life. That journey will test him in ways he had never expected, forcing him to use every ounce of his training just to stay alive.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Should be classified as Young Adult

  • By MissRed on 12-28-18

Better than the "White Tower"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

While I enjoyed Michael Wisehart’s first book, The White Tower, I found I enjoyed his newest series – Street Rats of Aramoor – far more. It was simply less violent and more fun.

This series, so far consisting of two books – Banished and Hurricane, takes place before Wisehart’s The White Tower. It follows a 13-year-old boy named Ayrion, a character you meet as an adult in The White Tower, and tells of his life before he ended up serving as the king’s protector. You learn where he came from and how he ended up in Aramoor.

While the series at this point stops short of telling how Ayrion first meets the king of Aaramoor, I would not be surprised if there are more books to follow, and if there aren’t, as it stands now, the ending of the second book will leave you satisfied.

This is definitely a book worth reading (or listening to if you prefer audio books), and it will be added to my “favorites” list.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Relic of the Gods

  • Echoes of Fate, Book 3
  • By: Philip C. Quaintrell
  • Narrated by: Steven Brand
  • Length: 16 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 415
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 393
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 394

The final days of hope have come and gone. The kingdoms of Illian stand on the edge of ruin, threatened by the armies of Valanis. As evil spreads across the land, too few are left to hold the line. A world away, the children of fire and flame may be the only hope for the realm. But the dragons have been defeated before, and Verda’s future now hangs in the balance. Reeling from their losses, Asher and his companions journey north, trying to outrun the savage Darkakin. A confrontation awaits the ranger, but even with Paldora’s gem, he dare not challenge Valanis yet.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Worst fight scene ever!!!!

  • By peter waugaman on 12-27-18

One of my new favorite books (not for teens)

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

Echoes of Fate, a book series by Philip C. Quaintrell, is a very engrossing story. At first I wasn’t sure I would like it because the story follows many different lead characters, all with weird sounding names. I didn’t think I would be able to follow the many different story lines. However, it was not long before the stories intertwined, making it easier and much more enjoyable to follow.

My favorite aspect about this story is the path for redemption that two of the characters – Asher, the main character, and Galanor – are on. Each of these characters has had a tumultuous past. Whereas Asher has already turned from his old life as an assassin when you first meet him, Galanor is conflicted between duty, which calls him to perform unsavory actions, and his desire to be a good person. While you get to see Galanor in the before-and-after stages of his path to redemption, you meet Asher after he has turned away from the life of an assassin. However, trusting and friendship are two things foreign to Asher, and it is fun to watch his relationship with the characters develop as he struggles to live life as a better person while carrying the guilt of his past life.

Due to the content of this series, I would say it is rated R. There is intermittent use of the F-word and some fairly graphic violence (at least by my standards). However, it is the scenes in which the Darkakin torture/rape the queen of the elves that is primarily responsible for my rating the book as R. It is hard to describe these scenes; they are not graphic but there is enough description and allusions to what is going on that it is bothersome. While this did not stop me from reading the book (as you can easily skip those scenes), it does make me hesitant to recommend it to anyone but a mature audience.

Note: I continued reading the book despite the scenes with the Darkakin because I am enjoying (I’m on the last book) the path to redemption of Asher and Galanor. I also enjoy the internal struggle of the other characters who, after experiencing horrendous torture or loss, fight to retain their virtues and moral beliefs. The characters in this book experience very real, human emotions. You see them struggle to be the people they want to be despite the torture they’ve experienced or the losses they have endured. For that reason alone, the book is worth reading as you see that no matter how horrible life can get, you should always strive to be the better person, even if you don’t always succeed.

P.S. I will be adding this to my favorite books for adults.

  • Empire of Dirt

  • Echoes of Fate, Book 2
  • By: Philip C. Quaintrell
  • Narrated by: Steven Brand
  • Length: 14 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 681
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 654
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 654

War is set to ravage the land of Illian. The elves sail from the east, the savage Darkakin rise from the south and Valanis, the dark elf, is finally free. Valanis would see the world plunged into chaos and drowned in blood, ready for the return of the gods that still haunt him. A new hope rises in the Red Mountains, where the last remaining dragons have been discovered. Gideon and Galanor, human and elf, will have to work together. Only then might they convince Adriel, the last of the Dragorn order, to intervene in the war to come.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a story, what a ride

  • By David on 05-07-18

One of my new favorite books (not for teens)

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

Echoes of Fate, a book series by Philip C. Quaintrell, is a very engrossing story. At first I wasn’t sure I would like it because the story follows many different lead characters, all with weird sounding names. I didn’t think I would be able to follow the many different story lines. However, it was not long before the stories intertwined, making it easier and much more enjoyable to follow.

My favorite aspect about this story is the path for redemption that two of the characters – Asher, the main character, and Galanor – are on. Each of these characters has had a tumultuous past. Whereas Asher has already turned from his old life as an assassin when you first meet him, Galanor is conflicted between duty, which calls him to perform unsavory actions, and his desire to be a good person. While you get to see Galanor in the before-and-after stages of his path to redemption, you meet Asher after he has turned away from the life of an assassin. However, trusting and friendship are two things foreign to Asher, and it is fun to watch his relationship with the characters develop as he struggles to live life as a better person while carrying the guilt of his past life.

Due to the content of this series, I would say it is rated R. There is intermittent use of the F-word and some fairly graphic violence (at least by my standards). However, it is the scenes in which the Darkakin torture/rape the queen of the elves that is primarily responsible for my rating the book as R. It is hard to describe these scenes; they are not graphic but there is enough description and allusions to what is going on that it is bothersome. While this did not stop me from reading the book (as you can easily skip those scenes), it does make me hesitant to recommend it to anyone but a mature audience.

Note: I continued reading the book despite the scenes with the Darkakin because I am enjoying (I’m on the last book) the path to redemption of Asher and Galanor. I also enjoy the internal struggle of the other characters who, after experiencing horrendous torture or loss, fight to retain their virtues and moral beliefs. The characters in this book experience very real, human emotions. You see them struggle to be the people they want to be despite the torture they’ve experienced or the losses they have endured. For that reason alone, the book is worth reading as you see that no matter how horrible life can get, you should always strive to be the better person, even if you don’t always succeed.

P.S. I will be adding this to my favorite books for adults.

  • Rise of the Ranger

  • Echoes of Fate, Book 1
  • By: Philip C. Quaintrell
  • Narrated by: Steven Brand
  • Length: 15 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,099
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,032
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,032

Mankind has lorded over the land of Illian for a thousand years, enjoying what was left to them by the elves, as if it were their birthright. A thousand years is a long time for an immortal race to see the error of their ways and realize a truth that has remained unsaid for a millennia - elves are superior! They are faster, stronger, and connected to the magical world in a way that man could never grasp. Illian is their birthright. The six kingdoms of man are fractured, unallied and always clawing at each other's doors for more power.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Worth it

  • By Ali on 03-24-18

One of my new favorite books (not for teens)

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

Echoes of Fate, a book series by Philip C. Quaintrell, is a very engrossing story. At first I wasn’t sure I would like it because the story follows many different lead characters, all with weird sounding names. I didn’t think I would be able to follow the many different story lines. However, it was not long before the stories intertwined, making it easier and much more enjoyable to follow.

My favorite aspect about this story is the path for redemption that two of the characters – Asher, the main character, and Galanor – are on. Each of these characters has had a tumultuous past. Whereas Asher has already turned from his old life as an assassin when you first meet him, Galanor is conflicted between duty, which calls him to perform unsavory actions, and his desire to be a good person. While you get to see Galanor in the before-and-after stages of his path to redemption, you meet Asher after he has turned away from the life of an assassin. However, trusting and friendship are two things foreign to Asher, and it is fun to watch his relationship with the characters develop as he struggles to live life as a better person while carrying the guilt of his past life.

Due to the content of this series, I would say it is rated R. There is intermittent use of the F-word and some fairly graphic violence (at least by my standards). However, it is the scenes in which the Darkakin torture/rape the queen of the elves that is primarily responsible for my rating the book as R. It is hard to describe these scenes; they are not graphic but there is enough description and allusions to what is going on that it is bothersome. While this did not stop me from reading the book (as you can easily skip those scenes), it does make me hesitant to recommend it to anyone but a mature audience.

Note: I continued reading the book despite the scenes with the Darkakin because I am enjoying (I’m on the last book) the path to redemption of Asher and Galanor. I also enjoy the internal struggle of the other characters who, after experiencing horrendous torture or loss, fight to retain their virtues and moral beliefs. The characters in this book experience very real, human emotions. You see them struggle to be the people they want to be despite the torture they’ve experienced or the losses they have endured. For that reason alone, the book is worth reading as you see that no matter how horrible life can get, you should always strive to be the better person, even if you don’t always succeed.

P.S. I will be adding this to my favorite books for adults.

  • Ascendant: Book 1

  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 17 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,973
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,643
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,626

The Wizard's Council of Tarador was supposed to tell young Koren Bladewell that he is a wizard. They were supposed to tell everyone that he is not a jinx, that all the bad things that happen around him are because he can't control the power inside him, power he doesn't know about. The people of his village, even his parents, are afraid of him, afraid he is cursed. That he is a dangerous, evil jinx.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A skeptic entertained

  • By David M on 11-22-17

This is my new favorite book series!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-18

Any additional comments?

Ascendant is the first book in the series, and it is a clean, fun book. No sex, only 5 instances of profanity (Yes, I counted because it was so surprising to find a young adult book that doesn't curse regularly). The characters are very likable and real characters. This is a book that a family with children ages 12 on up can enjoy (younger kids will probably get bored).

Ascendant is definitely getting added to my "Top 10 Favorite Books".

  • Transcendent

  • Ascendant, Book 2
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 16 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,964
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,455
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,423

Koren Bladewell's future was stolen from him, by wizards who chose to lie, to conceal the fact that Koren is a wizard. Crown princess Ariana Trehayme must find a way to become queen before her 16th birthday - before her indecisive mother allows all of Tarador to be conquered.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Can't wait for the next one...

  • By Christopher on 01-08-18

Entertaining, but not quite as good as the first b

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-18

Any additional comments?

Just finished Transcendent by Craig Alanson. It is the second book in the Ascendant series. Overall, it was a good book. This book primarily follows the lives of Koren, Ariana, and the Falco heir (whose first name escapes me at the moment). Where as in the first book, the three had lots of scenes together, in this book, they are all separated, so you spend quite a bit of time bouncing between one person's journey and the others.Some reviews on Goodreads and Amazon have said that the book is a little slow, and I agree with that. This book focuses more on the political intrigue of characters like Ariana and the Falco heir. Koren's adventures are primarily miscellaneous adventures as he endeavors to avoid his "curse".There is a little bit more profanity in this book than in the last one (just the use of "damn"), but still a clean book that you could listen to with 12 year-olds on up.This book wasn't quite as lighthearted as the first one, and there were a couple of story "flaws" or plot holes where I was like "that doesn't even seem plausible", but hey, this is a fantasy series, anything is possible. And, more importantly, the book held my interest, and I eagerly await the third book.

  • The White Tower

  • The Aldoran Chronicles, Book 1
  • By: Michael Wisehart
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 25 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,391
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,252
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,244

Magic is outlawed. Those caught wielding it are taken to the White Tower. They are never heard from again. After the chaos of the Wizard Wars a thousand years ago, the people turned their backs on magic. It was deemed evil. Those born with it will stop at nothing to remain hidden.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Spend the Credit

  • By Christopher on 09-22-17

An entertaining and clean book for adults

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-18

Would you consider the audio edition of The White Tower to be better than the print version?

I've only listened to the audio version. I will say that as much as I love the narrator, I'd probably prefer it in hard back. This story switches between A LOT of characters, which I find frustrating at times. I like to follow the character arcs of only one or two characters at a time. The print version would allow me to follow one character and then go back and read the stories of the other characters (or skip the character's I don't care about). It is too hard to do that with the audio book.

What other book might you compare The White Tower to and why?

This is my favorite book since Michael J. Sullivan's "Riyria Revelations" (also narrated by Tim Gerard Reynolds). I consider both books a "page turner", and I have a hard time putting either of them down.

I will say this book is more violent than the Riyria Revelations; it is not really graphic in its violence, but the torture instances make me a little uncomfortable, so very sensitive readers might get a bit squeamish, again not graphic, just the description of the pain that the character's face is kind of uncomfortable.

Have you listened to any of Tim Gerard Reynolds’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I'd actually even say this is his best narration yet, but then again, I've never listened to a bad narration of his. There are a lot more characters in this book than in others he's narrated, and he does a superb job making each of them unique.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

The torture scenes make me a bit squeamish when the pain the people are experiencing is described. The scenes aren't graphic like rated-R films; there is no graphic blood or extreme description of torture techniques, but the thought of the torture and the people's pain still makes me uncomfortable (as it should).

I will say that during heightened intense moments, the author knows how to throw a bit of humor in there. So, there are definitely some nice laughs along the way.

Any additional comments?

I think the author does a great job of capturing the human person, showing a wide range of emotions from all characters. The character's are human despite being set in a fantasy world. I think this is one of the first books I've listened to/read that you really connect with and empathize with the characters, even those that make questionable decisions. (Not so much the truly evil characters; they are evil, but some that border evil or simply make questionable choices - those you really get to empathize with or at least understand why they did what they did.)

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Hollow World

  • By: Michael J. Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 12 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 779
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 724
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 726

Ellis Rogers is an ordinary man who is about to embark on an extraordinary journey. All his life he has played it safe and done the right thing. But when he is faced with a terminal illness, Ellis is willing to take an insane gamble. He's built a time machine in his garage, and if it works, he'll face a world that challenges his understanding of what it means to be human, what it takes to love, and the cost of paradise. Ellis could find more than a cure for his disease; he might find what everyone has been searching for since time has begun.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • We Aren't in Riyria Any More

  • By Carol on 04-17-14

Sensitive Reader Alert: Quite a bit of profanity

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-17

Is there anything you would change about this book?

There is quite a bit of profanity in this book, including the use of the F-word, that may dishearten sensitive readers.

Would you be willing to try another book from Michael J. Sullivan? Why or why not?

I enjoy Michael J. Sullivan's other books - the Riyria Chronicles, Riyria Revalations, and Legends of the First Empire.There is not nearly as much profanity in them.

What does Jonathan Davis bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Jonathan Davis does a good job with the reading of the story. I enjoyed his narration, and would definitely listen to another narration by him.

Any additional comments?

The story idea is interesting. The story itself is well-written and catches your interest right away. Personally, I couldn't finish the book simply because I got tired of the profanity.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful