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JK907

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  • 448
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  • The Perfect Family

  • By: Shalini Boland
  • Narrated by: Katie Villa
  • Length: 7 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 62

Gemma Ballantine is getting ready for work one morning when her eldest child comes running down the stairs saying the words every mother dreads. The front door is open. And her six-year-old daughter has disappeared. Frantic with fear, Gemma starts a nail-biting search for her little girl. After what feels like forever, her mother-in-law, Diane, finds Katie wandering lost a few streets away. Relieved to have her youngest child back in her arms, breathing in the sweet scent of her hair, Gemma thinks the nightmare is over. But then her perfect family starts to fall apart....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved it.

  • By Angela M. Dokos on 11-10-18

should be titled: "The Perfect Nanny"

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-18

I've listened to all of Shalini Boland's books and this is on par with her other work. She is not my favorite author but she knows how to entertain and often you have to just go along with anything far-fetched in her books and this one is no different. The title should've been called something like "The Perfect Nanny" or something along those lines and it is also one of those stories where everything is unraveled at the very end. I prefer books with hints throughout to allow the audience to piece things together and have all the details come together to be relevant. Not bad, a typical story of the author's, but nothing outstanding.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Everett: A Dark Psychological Suspense Novel (Brooke Walton Series Book 1)

  • By: Jenifer Ruff
  • Narrated by: Stephanie Dillard
  • Length: 7 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2

Beautiful and brilliant Brooke, a transfer student with a mysterious past, aims to graduate first in her class at Everett and attend medical school. Her classmates and professors are captivated by her achievements and appearance. Only Jessica, a wealthy socialite fueled by prescription pills and a huge case of snobbery, senses there's something not quite right about the perfect student. What happens during a historic blizzard will settle their differences once and for all. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Could be considered a Young Adult (YA) novel

  • By JK907 on 11-13-18

Could be considered a Young Adult (YA) novel

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-18

This book was ok and held my interest, it is like a very mild, censored version of American Psycho but with a female college student. The summary makes it seem more intense and thrilling than it is. The main character really isn't that dark or with a disturbing past, to me, the summary implied her to be uncontrollable, doing anything necessary to get what she wants. However, she is more of a troubled girl with determination and unusual interests that will do what it takes to succeed in school. Not saying she is normal or typical, she certainly exhibits characteristics of a person with "sociopathy", but in a very tame way. But the more I think about it, she could be someone on the spectrum with learning or behavioral issues, rather than someone who is really disturbed. She comes from a loving family with supportive parents and cares deeply for her younger siblings so that alone is hard to detach from a supposed sociopathic person. She does do a few violent things – I think only 2-3 instances, but as I said, all quite mild compared to what I was expecting, almost a little "bubblegum" and they weren't even explicitly described, some were just implied. I was not impressed overall and it was extremely anti-climactic –– however, I was entertained and I will likely listen to the sequel just to see if there is more character development. I would not recommend it but this is good for those who like darkly themed books that are rather censored and not explicit.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Three Beths

  • By: Jeff Abbott
  • Narrated by: Ellen Archer
  • Length: 11 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

My mom would never leave me. This has been Mariah Dunning's motto. Her compass. Her belief. So when she glimpses her mother - who's been missing for the past year - on the other side of a crowded food court, Mariah's conviction becomes stronger than ever. Or is she losing her mind? When Beth Dunning disappeared without a trace, suspicion for her murder - despite the lack of a body or any physical evidence - immediately fell upon Mariah's father. Until Mariah stumbles upon two other recent disappearances from Lakehaven. All three women had the same name: Beth. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 2 Beths & a 3rd

  • By JK907 on 10-26-18

2 Beths & a 3rd

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-18

This book was pretty good, story held my interest and there were twists and turns I didn’t see but there were also as many that I did see coming. In general, this was a decent mystery/suspense. The only thing that didn’t make this book on the level of great was that Mariah, the protagonist, had absolutely zero difficulties when it came to accessing info and data that helped her unravel the mysteries that surrounded her mother’s disappearance. In reality, most of the things she was able to accomplish and act on would’ve been nearly impossible. Some examples: she so easily got practical strangers and people she just met to literally confess and reveal secrets to her; she also so easily obtained confidential company and personal info upon request or threats that would’ve in reality, landed her in significant trouble; people always just happened to be already logged into accounts when she happened upon their laptops and happened to not be home with the door unlocked; or she can guess passwords with 2 attempts. I don’t mean that everything should always be a struggle, but it makes a story more believable if events unfolded more realistically. This didn’t necessarily hinder the story but I definitely rolled my eyes a few time thinking “of course she was able to do that”. I know I’m just being a really tough critic, but I recently listened to a lot of solid mystery/thrillers so my threshold between good and great has a large discrepancy – but I did enjoy this book and I’ve listened to one of the author’s other books and equally liked it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Night Out

  • By: Catherine O'Connell
  • Narrated by: Katherine Fenton
  • Length: 11 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 8

Maggie is destined to marry the perfect man in two weeks. Desperate for a last wild night on the town before the big day, she gathers six friends for a night to remember. Only things go wrong, horribly wrong. Angie's body is found in the park the following morning, and the night to remember quickly becomes a nightmare they wish they could forget. Under police scrutiny, how far will Maggie and her friends go to keep their secrets - far enough to protect a killer?

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Yikes, couldn’t manage to get through it

  • By JK907 on 10-20-18

Yikes, couldn’t manage to get through it

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-18

I really wanted to like this book, I even pre-ordered it. I had to re-listen to nearly every chapter and I couldn’t get past 13.

Let me provide more accurate background because the summary is misleading. First the book is set in 1988 and they are in their early 30’s — I think they’re all 33 yrs old. The book so far is about 3 women who have been friends since high school. One is getting married so they have a bachelorette party and I think there were 6 women in attendance, I had to keep re-listening to it to make sure. Then it ends quite early in the night maybe ~9pm and 3 of them go home and we barely learn anything about them. The other 3 end up going out — two drive together and one drives alone — weird I know. She ends up driving her car home and taking a cab to meet the other 2 but it’s still super weird (and no, so far that hasn’t been significant toward the plot). Then they don’t even really have fun at the club and two of them go home via cab and the bride to be stays out. Then by now we know what happened since they reveal the death in the first minutes of the book. The bride to be goes home with a guy and the friend that was dropped off by the cab first is the one that ends up murdered. and from here it’s just super weak back story about the 3 women, I keep waiting for the other 3 to be relevant or even make an appearance. So anyway...

The character development was so weak off the bat. I mean these women just found out their best friend since high school was murdered and they treat the news instead like they found out she was getting a divorce or moving to another state for work. One character even told her husband almost as a “oh, by the way...” for example her friend came over to discuss the murder and when they were in the kitchen talking about it, her husband comes in and then he listens to their convo and remarks on the last thing they said and finally the wife turns to him and says, I have bad news, “Angie was murdered last night”. I can’t believe she wouldn’t have already told her husband the minute after she found out, even if it was after she informed other friends, and even if he was out of reach or out of town, that’s urgent info — not a passing comment. Also I couldn’t keep track or even identify these “six friends” as I mentioned. I realized how much I had to re-listen to so many parts because my interest couldn’t hold. I even tried to power through it to no avail. I’m done, not worth it. If others end up liking it I’m curious to read their reviews.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Lies We Told

  • By: Camilla Way
  • Narrated by: Sally Scott, Patience Tomlinson
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86

Beth has always known there was something strange about her daughter, Hannah. The lack of emotion, the disturbing behavior, the apparent delight in hurting others.... Luke comes from the perfect family, with the perfect parents. But one day, he disappears without a trace, and his girlfriend, Clara, is desperate to discover what has happened to him. As Clara digs into the past, she realizes no family is truly perfect and uncovers a link between Luke's long-lost sister and a strange girl named Hannah. Now Luke's life is in danger because of the lies once told and the secrets once kept.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 6 Stars

  • By Jamie L McHenry on 10-30-18

Wow. Highly Recommended Mystery/Thriller

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-16-18

This book is about two completely different families and the story of each is told in parallel but one is present day and the other is 20 years ago. The aspect that keeps you on the edge of your seat is how/when/if the two storylines/families converge. Each family has a very intriguing story that is so dissimilar you won’t even be able to imagine what they have to do with each other. Don’t let the somewhat dull few minutes of the book deter you, looking back, it really isn’t dull but the tone wasn’t so appealing to me personally and it took me two tries to get into it. This has to be one of the best and most intricately woven web of storylines — especially because the author keeps everything in order and you don’t get confused, which happens more often than not in other books that attempt such complicated plots. I listened to the author’s other book, “Watching Edie” and I got so confused and mixed-up I had to make notes to organize everything and relisten to so many parts — although this was mostly due to the practically indistinctive narration of the two main characters. But anyway, whether or not you liked her other book, this one is great on its own. I highly recommend it, I’d put this in my top 20 maybe even 15 of the year and I go through at least 2 books a week, minimum.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Our Little Lies

  • By: Sue Watson
  • Narrated by: Katie Villa
  • Length: 10 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 586
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 537
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 536

Marianne has a life others dream of. A beautiful townhouse on the best street in the neighbourhood. Three bright children who are her pride and joy. Sometimes her past still hurts: losing her mother early, growing up in foster care. But her husband, Simon, is always there. A successful surgeon, he’s the envy of every woman they’ve ever met. Flowers, gifts, trips to France: nothing is too good for his family. Then Simon says another woman’s name. The way he lingers on it, Caroline, gives Marianne a shudder of suspicion, but she knows it’s nothing - she can’t entertain this flash of paranoia.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Really maddening book

  • By Caroline on 10-29-18

WOW. FINALLY. BRAVO. 👏🏽👌🏽

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-18

Finally, a real and proper domestic mystery/thriller. Of all the other books I’ve been rating so high before this, I almost want to knock every single one of them down a star so my perfect rating for this book will be more meaningful.

This book was perfectly executed. It unfolded at a fantastic pace and webs were woven and clues were dropped EXQUISITELY. I listen to at least 2 audiobooks a week — literally, so there isn’t much I haven’t heard in audible in the domestic mystery/thriller genre. Sue Watson did a phenomenal job of leaving just the right amount of bread crumbs, not too big, not too small, not spaced too close together but also not too far apart, this is one of the best unfoldings of a mystery/thriller I have ever heard.

The whole book and storyline were amazingly unpredictable. I keep a book journal and I like to note my thoughts and guesses throughout a book so I can reflect and compare how and what I thought during and the ending. Chapter after chapter I assumed I had the storyline pegged and each time I was refreshingly incorrect. I was never ever once bored and I couldn’t stop listening.

I just LOVE intricately and intentionally placed clues and this book nails it. It’s so hard to get that balance right but as I said, the author knew what she was doing. If for whatever reason this book ends up getting rated low on audible, read reviews for the hard copy of the book. I think audiobooks have a whole set of other factors to scrutinize that have nothing at all to do with the books itself — such as a narrator ruining the tone or inaccurately representing moods, tones and voices.

I noticed the author’s other two books aren’t even in the same genre as this so I was even more impressed and I really hope she continues. And if she does I know she will perfect her storytelling even further.

Ok so let me get something out of the way that seems deterrent but isn’t because this book was so good the author could’ve gotten away with A LOT, but I can see how what I’m about to disclose (NOT a spoiler, don’t worry) would make someone roll their eyes...
So in the beginning the point is really hammered home about the wife acknowledging and the husband having a “god-complex” just because he is a cardiac surgeon. It was a repetition of Marianne reveling nonstop in any context possible about how perfect/enviable her life is because she is the wife of a surgeon. She definitely knew and admitted it was all superficial and there was a dark side. But it was almost as if the author was worried we might somehow not understand the extent to which we are supposed to think how fabulous being married to and having a family with a doctor is. However, all that easily becomes nothing as soon as you see how great the book moves along.

This books was organized and so carefully written and there was no moment whatsoever of disinterest or boredom — quite the opposite in fact. You may think you know what will happen but you’ll be oh so pleasantly mistaken. I highly, highly, highly recommend this book. Bravo Sue Watson, please, please keep these quality stories coming!!!

35 of 38 people found this review helpful

  • We Were Mothers

  • A Novel
  • By: Katie Sise
  • Narrated by: Stacy Gonzalez
  • Length: 10 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 43
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 42

A scandalous revelation is about to devastate a picturesque town where the houses are immaculate and the neighborhoods are tightly knit. Devoted mother Cora O’Connell has found the journal of her friend Laurel’s daughter - a beautiful college student who lives next door - revealing an illicit encounter. Hours later, Laurel makes a shattering discovery of her own: her daughter has vanished without a trace. Over the course of one weekend, the crises of two close families are about to trigger a chain reaction that will expose a far more disturbing web of secrets.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good ,but too long

  • By night owl on 11-01-18

Very Solid Story, Entertained Throughout

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

I rated this book 5 stars all-around because I think it is already rated far too low, too soon and will unnecessarily deter some from a good book that was much better than so many I have listened to lately. My real rating is close but would more accurately be: Overall: 4.25 | Performance: 5 | Story: 4

I read reviews for this book from Amazon, and many were confused by how many characters and side plots there were –– and there were a lot of people in the story but the character development for each person was done quite well, and I know this is very hard to do. Usually, with these many people in a story, some character's end up being irrelevant but in this book overall, the stories were all significant and solidly intertwined. The reason I think this is because we actually get to hear the point-of-view of almost everyone (it switches back and forth) and how they feel about the other characters and gain insight about what they think and feel and this really contributes to the story. However, even with that said, I can name one storyline/character that could've been removed without too much impact on the plot. I think the only real confusion I felt was how everyone was referred to by name...so for example, if Sarah was identified and started narrating, I would forget she was Cora's mom and think, and it would take me a second to remember that so I did have to pay extra attention, but it was worth it (also, Cora called her own mother Sarah so that could've been why I got confused).

What I was most impressed about in the book were the events that drove the story and the way it affected each person –– there was definitely a central pull to everyone's actions which brought the plot together nicely. It wasn't flawlessly written, but it was better than a lot of domestic thrillers by more experienced authors. The story was easy to get into, and I was thoroughly entertained until the end.

I think the summary was a little misleading. The book really is NOT about a neighbor/daughter going missing – that was not the driving element of the story whatsoever, if anything that was just something eventually realized. In the summary, the "crises of two close families" is not centered on the disappearance of the girl, I think the author tried to do this with voicemail flashbacks, but I don't think it contributed to that aspect of the story – although they were helpful in dropping the perfect amount of clues throughout the book without giving too much away. I think a more accurate title for the book could be: "Maggie and the Mothers" because Maggie was the glue that really bound the characters and thus storyline, together.

Judging the book on just character behavior or personality, there were, of course, some more likable than others and what happens to them at the end may not be how you want and I can see how it might not make the audience feel satisfied. But as a story as a whole, I think it works.

  • The New Girl

  • By: Ingrid Alexandra
  • Narrated by: Sarah Kants
  • Length: 8 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 3

When Rachel moves into the spare room in Mary’s flat, everyone is quick to jump to the conclusion that there’s something strange about her. Everyone apart from Mary. And when Rachel starts sleepwalking, the flatmates’ fears grow. But there’s something about the new girl that Mary can’t help but trust, and having recently escaped a toxic relationship, she needs the support. Rachel becomes a friend and an ally, and Mary soon discovers that they have more in common than she ever could have imagined. In fact, Rachel seems to know more about Mary than she knows about herself....

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Wasn’t for me, but I really wanted it to!

  • By JK907 on 10-05-18

Wasn’t for me, but I really wanted it to!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-18

I read a few reviews for the hard copy of the book when it came out before the audio and a lot of people admitted that they really wanted to like the book because of the title and the cover art — which of course we all know we shouldn’t do... but I’m reluctant to say that I too was one of those people. Unfortunately, there was just not enough depth to the plot. There was a lack of character development and the overall tone wasn’t capturing. I really gave this book a fair shot too, some of those positive reviews I read said it just took a bit to get into but I wasn’t able to do so. There also wasn’t any real urgency or build up, it was more of a mood of “consistent threat” if that make sense, so when exciting or dramatic things occurred, I wasn’t surprised. Also, timelines and other details were a little confusing. I think whole presentation of the book exuded a certain appeal that was slightly misleading. Because of the other high ratings I wouldn’t be surprised if more end up liking the audio book as well. I for sure would NOT recommend it, but I wouldn’t prevent anyone from getting it if it’s already in ur cart and you’re right about to hit the buy button. I’m interested to check back and see how this books ends up doing on Audible.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Girlfriend

  • By: Michelle Frances
  • Narrated by: Henrietta Meire
  • Length: 10 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 468
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 429
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 427

Laura Cavendish can't wait to meet the woman who's won her son's affection. Despite a successful career in television and a long, prosperous marriage, Laura's world revolves around kind, talented Daniel. She pictures his new girlfriend, Cherry, becoming a close friend and confidante ...one day, even a daughter-in-law. But although Cherry is beautiful and amiable, Laura can't warm to her. There's something about the possessive way she touches Daniel, the little lies Laura detects. Cherry seems to resent Laura, driving a wedge between mother and son - until one day Daniel is injured.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Solid Domestic Thriller

  • By Wendy Carter on 02-10-18

wow twisted

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-18

I really enjoy thrillers— of all topics, I’m in no way easily offended or disturbed by controversial or sensitive subject matter. And with that said, I was shocked by the behavior of these two women in this book (but mostly because of the extent to which they behaved, not necessarily their specific actions). However, this isn’t inevitably a negative thing, it may be how well the author can develop her characters. It’s almost like how some actors are so good at the roles that you end up not liking them in general because of how effective and talented they performed their character. I think the story could’ve been more digestible if the sequence of events were ordered differently or if there were more substantive reasoning behind the assumptions the women had about each other. Overall, however, the behavior of the GF (girlfriend) and the mother was abhorrent, but I get it was supposed to be as such. But their actions and reactions were not really justified, especially when considering them together. Without spoiling it, the mother would do something drastic, and in turn, the GF would react and vice-versa, but their actions were never in line with one another — but again perhaps their relationship was supposed to be that disjointed for all the ”misunderstanding” to happen. I don’t know if that makes sense, but that was really the crux of the plot.

Hm, so for instance (these are NOT real examples from the book, just some hypotheticals to get a sense of what I mean) let’s say the mom fakes a DNA test and reveals to the GF that the GF’s parents aren’t her biological parents and her real parents are notorious murderers and tells everyone in town and it affects most areas of her young life — all because of an assumption the mom has about the GF. Then, the GF learns it wasn’t a real DNA test and the mom faked it, so now the GF then sets the mom’s house on fire to get back at her (yes, how extreme). The mom is upset but sticks to her assumptions about the GF and is merely not friendly toward her at social gatherings. Then the GF is annoyed that the house fire didn’t affect the mom enough and is mad she’s being ignored so she then humiliates the mom by making it look like she shoplifted at a store even though she’s wealthy and pays a security guard to say that the mom harassed him and the story ends up in the tabloids and is the talk of the town. The mom is furious now and so she tries to talk to the GF but the GF plays innocent and goes about her days. The GF however, is annoyed the mom tried to even talk to her in the first place so she then switches out the mom’s shampoo so all her hair falls out and the mom thinks she has a disease and sees doctor after doctor seeking a diagnosis for her sudden hair loss. The GF then goes further and convinces a doctor to give her a false diagnosis and the mom takes medicines she doesn’t need. The mom learns the truth about all of this and confronts the GF. But the GF is mad the mom confronted her (yes, very unreasonable) so she then has the mom’s car stolen and makes it look like insurance fraud, again humiliating the mom.

So, see how all the actions and reactions aren’t reasonable and are very unequal? That’s how the book unfolds, and you don’t end up liking either of the women and although the DNA faking was messed up, the GF really went to great lengths to get back at her, in very permanent ways that matter.

I was both absorbed and disturbed by the actions of the characters and not so much the plot as a whole and if you’re easily disturbed or appalled, you probably won’t like the book. But if you can get past that somehow (it’s the whole theme of the book, not just certain events) then you might be interested. I wouldn’t recommend this book just because it’s the kind of story that people will blame you on for encouraging. I saw in other reviews that some were particularly disturbed by a "puppy scene", and that was enough for me to not recommend the book to a select few – but I can't well make a recommendation for everyone just based on that. I also wouldn’t prevent anyone who is interested in the book so you can make your own assessments of the story as a whole.

  • Guest Bed

  • By: Luke P Narlee
  • Narrated by: Dan Delgado
  • Length: 6 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

Ron’s day is off to a bad start. Blinded by frustration after another argument with his wife and heartbroken that his marriage may be over, he accidentally crashes his car on his way to work. Dazed, he takes the train the rest of the way, where he is quickly delighted by the presence of another rider, Courtney, whose smoldering smile makes him remember what it feels like to be wanted. What seems like a new friendship quickly turns into temptation, leaving Ron torn with internal conflict and guilt. But when his new friend starts to seem a little off, he begins to question her motives.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Looking in My Window

  • By BookLover on 11-13-18

Overall unrealistic story line

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-20-18

Hmm....Let me start off by providing a theme/sentiment/mood of what kind of story this is because I had zero inclination of what I was in for based on the summary. As the book approached the middle and during midway, it seemed like it was going to be a warped version of the Adam Sandler movie, “Click” and the Nick Cage movie “The Family Man” combined. But that quickly dissipated and toward the end it then switched pace and reminded me of a really weird, confusing dark and extended version of an episode of the old tv show The Wonder Years. But I don’t mean this comparison based on the family or characters— I mean this because of the mood of the story as it came to and end — an odd kind of familial domestic drama. Additionally, it also seemed like the author wrote this book as an indirect (or direct) way to make a point or give a very, very particular message to his wife or to a specific female. This book started off in a way where I thought I knew exactly how it would turn out because of how obvious and blatant the story was unfolding. However, there was a twist that changed the game. Then it got interesting and the possibilities of what kind of book this was going to be were seemingly endless. I was intrigued by the prospect of it being twisted, or reality-bending even. Alas, as the end came closer and closer I realized we were back to square one. It was sooooo close to being a really wild and entertaining tale but it completely veered off that path. The one good thing is that it didn’t not end or unravel how I thought it would. This might be one of those books with mixed and conflicting reviews. Oh on a side note there were times where I laughed out load at the narration— like when the male narrator impersonated an old woman, child, or upset mother😂