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Shawn

  • 79
  • reviews
  • 86
  • helpful votes
  • 85
  • ratings
  • Breakpoint

  • Reckoning with America’s Environmental Crises
  • By: Jeremy B. C. Jackson, Steve Chapple
  • Narrated by: Keith Sellon-Wright
  • Length: 8 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4

Eminent ecologist Jeremy B. C. Jackson and award-winning journalist Steve Chapple traveled the length of the Mississippi River interviewing farmers, fishermen, scientists, and policymakers to better understand the mounting environmental problems ravaging the United States. Along their journey, which quickly expanded to California, Florida, and New York, the pair uncovered surprising and profound connections between ecological systems and environmental crises across the country. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • U.S.-Ceentered View of Climate Change & Ag

  • By Shawn on 04-19-19

U.S.-Ceentered View of Climate Change & Ag

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-19-19

The book starts with visits to farmers and coastal areas. Then it gets into serious climate discussion. The science is solid. The book is interesting and well done.

  • No Immediate Danger

  • Carbon Ideologies, Volume One
  • By: William T. Vollmann
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 16 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 22

In his nonfiction, William T. Vollmann has won acclaim as a singular voice tackling some of the most important issues of our age. Now, Vollmann turns to a topic that will define the generations to come - the factors and human actions that have led to global warming. Vollmann begins No Immediate Danger by examining and quantifying the many causes of climate change, from industrial manufacturing and agricultural practices to fossil fuel extraction, economic demand for electric power, and the justifiable yearning of people all over the world to live in comfort. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Look at the brightside always and die in a dream!

  • By Darwin8u on 04-14-19

Too Much Fukushima: Talking to Future Generations

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-19

Some good climate science research, but I don't recommend this book in the least. The author pretends he is talking to future generations. That is a big turn-off. Then most of the book is about measuring radiation in Fukushima.

  • The Coming Storm

  • By: Michael Lewis
  • Narrated by: Michael Lewis
  • Length: 2 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,662
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,962
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,920

Tornadoes, cyclones, tsunamis… Weather can be deadly – especially when it strikes without warning. Millions of Americans could soon find themselves at the mercy of violent weather if the public data behind lifesaving storm alerts gets privatized for personal gain. In his first Audible Original feature, New York Times best-selling author and journalist Michael Lewis delivers hard-hitting research on not-so-random weather data – and how Washington plans to release it. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Why you shouldn't ignore the weather forecast

  • By Elisabeth Carey on 09-10-18

How Weather Reporting Is Mishandled

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-19

Focusing on Kathy Sullivan and D.J.Patil, the author explains what NOAA does with weather, and what industry and politicians do with it. It's somewhat enlightening, and the author reads it fairly well.

  • A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms

  • A Song of Ice and Fire
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Harry Lloyd
  • Length: 10 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,597
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,065
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,999

Taking place nearly a century before the events of A Game of Thrones, A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms compiles the first three official prequel novellas to George R. R. Martin's ongoing masterwork, A Song of Ice and Fire. Before Tyrion Lannister and Podrick Payne, there were Dunk and Egg. A young, naïve, but ultimately courageous hedge knight, Ser Duncan the Tall towers above his rivals - in stature if not experience. Tagging along is his diminutive squire, a boy called Egg - whose true name (hidden from all he and Dunk encounter) is Aegon Targaryen.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Martin is a genius

  • By Celeste Albers on 04-26-16

Fun Read from a Maester

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-19

I've met GRRM personally. I didn't care for him at the time, though we were both very young. There's no doubt, though, that he is a great writer. As always, he is interesting, fun to read, and with great characters. Harry Lloyd is a great reader, as well. I write this review in memory of Dave Bischoff. I hope GRRM remembers him.

  • The Uninhabitable Earth

  • Life After Warming
  • By: David Wallace-Wells
  • Narrated by: David Wallace-Wells
  • Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 598
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 547
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 544

It is worse, much worse, than you think. If your anxiety about global warming is dominated by fears of sea-level rise, you are barely scratching the surface of what terrors are possible. Like An Inconvenient Truth and Silent Spring before it, The Uninhabitable Earth is both a meditation on the devastation we have brought upon ourselves and an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don’t read if you have depressive tendencies.

  • By Ricky on 03-17-19

Painful but Necessary

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-19

The first 12 chapters describe how quickly we are destroying Earth's ability to support life. Then some intelligent thoughts about it. A touch of exaggeration, but not much. The one great improvement would have been having a professional reader.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist

  • By: Kate Raworth
  • Narrated by: Kate Raworth
  • Length: 10 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 78
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67

Economics is the mother tongue of public policy. It dominates our decision-making for the future, guides multi-billion-dollar investments, and shapes our responses to climate change, inequality, and other environmental and social challenges that define our times. Pity then, or more like disaster, that its fundamental ideas are centuries out of date yet are still taught in college courses worldwide and still used to address critical issues in government and business alike. That's why it is time, says renegade economist Kate Raworth, to revise our economic thinking for the 21st century. In Doughnut Economics, she sets out seven key ways to fundamentally reframe our understanding of what economics is and does. Along the way, she points out how we can break our addiction to growth; redesign money, finance, and business to be in service to people; and create economies that are regenerative and distributive by design.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thought Provoking

  • By Patrick G on 04-05-18

How to Change Economics to Fix the Woy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-19

Raworth argues that classical economics is wrong and if it were done correctly, we could fix many of the world's problems. She is very persuasive, but it seems she is fighting an uphill battle. She reads her book like an audio artist, and she has a great accent.

  • The Five-Ton Life: Carbon, America, and the Culture That May Save Us

  • Our Sustainable Future
  • By: Susan Subak
  • Narrated by: Rosemary Benson
  • Length: 8 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    2.5 out of 5 stars 3

At nearly 20 tons per person, American carbon dioxide emissions are among the highest in the world. Not every American fits this statistic, however. Across the country, there are urban neighborhoods, suburbs, rural areas, and commercial institutions that have drastically lower carbon footprints. These exceptional places, as it turns out, are neither “poor” nor technologically advanced. Their low emissions are due to culture. Author Susan Subak uses previously untapped sources to discover and explore various low-carbon locations.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • George Washington & Climate Change?

  • By Shawn on 01-30-19

George Washington & Climate Change?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-19

Subak's heart is in the right place, but as someone fighting global warming, she's very weird. She claims Washington was a low-carbon guru, but never mentions it wouldn't be if not for his slaves. She ignores the fossil fuel industry, and thinks if we all suffer, it will fix global warming.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Power Moves

  • Lessons from Davos
  • By: Adam Grant
  • Narrated by: Adam Grant
  • Length: 3 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,430
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,104
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,066

Power is changing. Private corner offices and management by decree are out, as is unquestioned trust in the government and media. These former pillars of traditional power have been replaced by networks of informed citizens who collectively wield more power over their personal lives, employers, and worlds than ever before. So how do you navigate this new landscape and come out on top?  Adam Grant, Wharton organizational psychologist, went to the World Economic Forum in Davos, the epicenter of power, and sat down with thought leaders from around the world, to find out.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Disorganized

  • By mike a on 01-16-19

Study of Power

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-19

I expected more about Davos. Instead, it was a series of short Q and A's about power from powerful people.

  • Spineless

  • The Science of Jellyfish and the Art of Growing a Backbone
  • By: Juli Berwald
  • Narrated by: Juli Berwald
  • Length: 10 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 77
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77

Jellyfish are an enigma. They have no centralized brain, but they see and feel and react to their environment in complex ways. They look simple, yet their propulsion systems are so advanced that engineers are just learning how to mimic them. They produce some of the deadliest toxins on the planet and still remain undeniably alluring. Long ignored by science, they may be a key to ecosystem stability. Juli Berwald's journey into the world of jellyfish is a personal one.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The closest thing to a jellyfish textbook

  • By Anonymous User on 06-28-18

Autobiography of Juli Jellyfish

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-09-19

This is half autobiography of Juli Berwald and half treatise on the science of jellyfish. Berwald reads it well and there is joy in her voice for much of it that wouldn't come with a professional reader, but it is obvious she is not a trained reader, which would have been better.

As a character in her own book, she starts out wondering about global warming and jellyfish, but that gets lost along the way,. She obviously has disgust for global warming, but leaves the reader confused as to what to do about it and how it relates to jellyfish.

It's reasonably pleasant to listen to, mostly due to the autobiography, But even that is confused. She has a doctorate in science, but doesn't work as a scientist and regrets it. The autobiography doesn't resolve that and doesn't get enough into her life to know where she may go with her degree and her regret.

So the book, itself, is spineless. It's somewhat enjoyable, it teaches a lot about jellyfish, but it wobbles all over like jelly.

  • Watermelon Snow

  • By: William A. Liggett
  • Narrated by: Erin Bennett
  • Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16

Deep within the melting Blue Glacier in the Washington wilderness, climate scientist Dr. Kate Landry makes a remarkable discovery. Needing to conceal it from colleagues too eager to steal her work, she must distract the behavioral scientist NASA sends to study her team. From the moment he sets foot on the ice, Dr. Grant Poole finds himself in a strange world of unexpected beauty but fraught with extreme dangers he has tried his whole life to avoid. Greeted with suspicion, he soon realizes Kate is hiding something.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great adventure

  • By Daniel on 11-09-18

Excitement but Not Much Else

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-18

Erin Bennett, the reader, shows great talent. The author does not. The book starts with telling outright, rather than showing, that two characters are desperate for romance. These are major characters who are poorly developed, and yet dislikable. Then the book gets exciting due to people constantly slipping and almost falling down cliffs to their death. That's repeated and repeated, but it is exciting. The book starts very preachy about global warming, but then ignores it. The romance at the end is not believable. The plot, overall is not believable. Global warming books need to pull at heartstrings, not turn stomachs.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful