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Warren

Oakland, CA, United States
  • 2
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  • 10
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  • 15
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  • "Getting Back to Me"

  • From Girl to Boy to Woman in Just Fifty Years
  • By: Scottie Jeanette Madden
  • Narrated by: Scottie Jeanette Madden
  • Length: 11 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2

This is the account of the coming out of a respected adventure survival filmmaker, taken from her journal entries as she leaves behind fear and white male privilege to embrace truth, grace and womanhood. Her gut-wrenching journey of love, acceptance and honesty becomes the ultimate survival show. Scottie didn't make it easy on herself. Like many late-stage trans women, Scottie had made one helluva guy; succeeding as a husband of 25 years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Book To Inspire Us All

  • By Warren on 02-13-17

A Book To Inspire Us All

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-13-17

What did you love best about "Getting Back to Me"?

I knew and loved Scottie for many years as Scott. I needed and wanted to understand the why and the how and reading her story removed the mystery and brought me back to the love I’ve always felt.

Who was your favorite character and why?

The author, herself, is THE character. I was intrigued by how well she articulated the journey from being totally in the closet to being totally out there.

What about Scottie Jeanette Madden’s performance did you like?

I loved the narration. Scottie would repeat herself, saying the same sentence several times, but each time she said it, it would be entirely different - with a different intonation and a different meaning. It would be excellent narration for any audiobook but especially since it is about Scottie herself. I can't imagine anyone but her being able to express the same meanings that she was able to convey.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I was moved by the faith that Scottie had in her friends, relatives, co-workers, and associates that they would be accepting of the new persona that was emerging. It was this faith that enabled her to make this transition as smoothly and completely in such a relatively short period of time.

Any additional comments?

Besides its smooth narrative flow, it’s also a “how to” manual on how to come out with grace and love and courage, and will be of great support to countless numbers of people who are struggling with the same issues. I am so grateful to Scottie for sharing her story so generously and hope it illumines for others, as it did for me, what it means to become yourself.

  • Journey to Ixtlan

  • The Lessons of Don Juan
  • By: Carlos Castaneda
  • Narrated by: Luis Moreno
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 613
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 508
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 519

Carlos Castanada was a student of anthropology when he met Don Juan Matus, a Yaqui shaman and the inspiration for Castanada’s The Teachings of Don Juan. In this controversial work, Castanada relays his experiences being challenged by his mentor on his perception of the world and all living things in it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Journey To Ixtlan

  • By Curtis on 10-28-10

So well done! How about doing Tales of Power?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-13

If you could sum up Journey to Ixtlan in three words, what would they be?

This classic Castaneda story, the first which doesn't feature psychedelic drugs, holds up well in time. I first read it 40 years ago. Immediately, after listening to Journey to Ixtlan, I tried to find the audiobook version of Tales Of Power, the book that follows this one, but it apparently does not exist in audio format. I would beg Luis Moreno to do this sequel, as the new generation of audiobook listeners shouldn't be tantalized with Journey To Ixtlan, salivating for more, only to find the series abruptly terminated.

What other book might you compare Journey to Ixtlan to and why?

Autobiography of a Yogi is the closest that comes to mind. Truly, there is little out there that compares to Castaneda's writing. He's in a class by himself.

Which scene was your favorite?

The "hiding" of Carlos's car was a lot of fun.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I love the concept of a "Worthy Opponent," and Carlos's experiences with his.

Any additional comments?

Put Tales of Power into Audiobook format!

10 of 10 people found this review helpful