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D. Bryant

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  • The Ten-Cent Plague

  • The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America
  • By: David Hajdu
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki
  • Length: 11 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 636
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 454
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 453

In the years between World War II and the emergence of television as a mass medium, American popular culture as we know it was first created in the bold, pulpy pages of comic books. The Ten-Cent Plague explores this cultural emergence and its fierce backlash while challenging common notions of the divide between "high" and "low" art.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Art can't hurt you

  • By Don M on 05-03-08

Have no love for comics, yet found this fasinating

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-13-17

I went out on a limb and got this in a 2-for-1 deal. Was more than a little hesitant considering I've owned less than 10 comic books in my life, but I wanted something non-fiction / educational and tend to enjoy historical books, even if the subjects are unfamiliar.

Anyway, even though I still have no interest to pick up a comic book, I have no regrets in picking this up and feel I can understand the love of comics now and have at least cured myself of ignorance in the history of comics.

However, what I really gained from this book was an interesting look into the viewpoint of the mob, in the generic sense. Those who would rather waste the energy and attention into destroying something they consider strange or evil, rather than channeling that passion and focus into producing something good. The sort who skilled in creating hate and are not only proud in their talent, but are celebrated, for a short time before they are forgotten or turn their attention on a new target.

Having recently read/listened to "The Ultimate History of Video Games: From Pong to Pokemon" and a similar history of Dungeons and Dragons, where the same single mindedness was aimed at the destruction of video games and RPGs. It becomes depressingly obvious that events do repeat themselves and society will probably continue to lash out at any shifts in culture before any evidence can be gathered while they are lead by those who prefer to see society frozen in the blissful memory of their childhood.

Beyond the more gloomy sections of the history of comics, there is plenty of humor in this narrative along with the bright and dark sides of the corporate world.

The narration was great, though some did complain of mispronunciations. I didn't really notice.

For those interested in this book, I will also recommend "How Star Wars Conquered the Universe, The Ultimate History of Video Games, Super Mario: The History of Nintendo" and "Masters of the Air" a history of the air war over Europe.

Audible 20 Review Sweepstakes Entry

  • The Dragonet Prophecy

  • Wings of Fire, Book #1
  • By: Tui T. Sutherland
  • Narrated by: Shannon McManus
  • Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 724
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 590
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 589

A thrilling new series soars above the competition and redefines middle-grade fantasy fiction for a new generation! The seven dragon tribes have been at war for generations, locked in an endless battle over an ancient, lost treasure. A secret movement called the Talons of Peace is determined to bring an end to the fighting, with the help of a prophecy - a foretelling that calls for great sacrifice. Five dragonets are collected to fulfill the prophecy, raised in a hidden cave and enlisted, against their will, to end the terrible war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing, the best series I've ever read.

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-10-16

Better than the cover suggests...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-25-17

I have nothing against the cover, but it does suggest a more childish book than I what I got, which was good. It was pretty complex and didn't pull the punches I was expecting it to, which I enjoyed. These dragons were often cute, but they were also cruel.

Has a nice message of: The world isn't going to fair because you want it to be. You can accept it for what it is or you can do something about it.

  • The Cloud Roads

  • By: Martha Wells
  • Narrated by: Christopher Kipiniak
  • Length: 15 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 908
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 822
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 821

Moon has spent his life hiding what he is - a shape-shifter able to transform himself into a winged creature of flight. An orphan with only vague memories of his own kind, Moon tries to fit in among the tribes of his river valley, with mixed success. Just as Moon is once again cast out by his adopted tribe, he discovers a shape-shifter like himself... someone who seems to know exactly what he is, who promises that Moon will be welcomed into his community.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Very original but flawed

  • By David on 06-22-13

Better than I remember...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-17

My first listen of this book and series was not wholly encouraging. The narration seemed clunky, I remember constant mid-sentence breaks that drove me nuts and a fantasy world that seemed simple enough but still managed to confuse me despite the story's slow pace. I had trouble keeping track of characters who all seemed to have similar names. (Leaf, Petal, Pond, Root, etc) But I liked the world and characters enough to continue on and on through the series.

Having all but finished the series, I decided to start again with a better understanding of the world and characters and the whole thing just clicked. The narration was great (perhaps I managed to listen to the whole thing at a reduced speed or just grew accustomed to it) and I could focus on the smaller details rather than trying to puzzle things out as the story plowed ahead at full steam. Even the pacing feels improved, though I still consider it a slow burning plot.

Looking forward to refreshing my opinion of Book 2.

  • Stories of the Raksura, Book 1

  • By: Martha Wells
  • Narrated by: Christopher Kipiniak
  • Length: 9 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 119
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115

"In The Falling World", Jade, sister queen of the Indigo Cloud Court, has traveled with Chime and Balm to another Raksuran court. When she fails to return, her consort, Moon, along with Stone and a party of warriors and hunters, must track them down. Finding them turns out to be the easy part; freeing them from an ancient trap hidden in the depths of the Reaches is much more difficult. "The Tale of Indigo and Cloud" explores the history of the Indigo Cloud Court, long before Moon was born.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I love Raksura backstories

  • By Gael Dalton on 10-04-17

Enjoyed Three-Fourths of the Short Stories

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-15

Shorter is Better.

I've listened to two of the current three novel series (which I mildly regret, for there were spoilers for BK 3: Siren's Depths, in the first short) and I found that these short stories held my interest more consistently than either of those novels.

The first short, The Falling World, was my least favorite for this reason. It was long enough to suffer from novel-like pacing and had a conflict that felt like a mediocre Dr. Who episode.

The second, The Tale of Indigo and Cloud, was my favorite. Set in the court's past, which seemed cheery and upbeat when compared to the presently stiff court. This difference in emotional tone was likely a heavy point in its favor after hundreds of pages of reserved dialogue from Moon, Stone, and Jade. I enjoyed the cast of characters as well. I even listened to it again after I finished the collection.

I found the Forest Boy to be equal parts cute and eye rolling cliche. I enjoyed it in the end. You can't really dislike a childhood Moon.

I was skeptical about the last one once I realized what it would be about, but enjoyed it as well.

Either I was enjoying myself too much to notice or the narrator was enjoying himself as well and did a better reading because of it. The narrator was not what I wished in the novels, but after the first story in this collection, I don't remember any odd and distracting pauses that seemed to fill the novels.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Alloy of Law

  • A Mistborn Novel
  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 10 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,107
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19,382
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,381

Three hundred years after the events of the Mistborn trilogy, Scadrial is now on the verge of modernity, with railroads to supplement the canals, electric lighting in the streets and the homes of the wealthy, and the first steel-framed skyscrapers racing for the clouds.Kelsier, Vin, Elend, Sazed, Spook, and the rest are now part of history—or religion. Yet the old magics of Allomancy and Feruchemy continue to play a role in this reborn world....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Shorter, but very entertaining

  • By Robin on 12-14-11

AoL Sequel: Wanted Dead or Alive

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-11

Yes there are quite a few loose ends (with even more added in the last moments) considering this isn't mentioned as a series. I'd guess its intended to be the prologue for the next Mistborn trilogy but who knows. Beyond that this is what I have to say of the story. This isn't a western, just think of it as Mistborn with a bounty hunter as the main character with guns and trains in the mix. The provided summary explains as much as can be.

There are only three protagonists in this book compared to the many major and minor of Final Empire (400 less pages will do that.) Wax, his sidekick and a girl who I'll avoid names to keep spoilers out. Wax reminds me of Elend (but less classy and twenty years older). He's interesting, your basic lawman with a past but like Elend spends too much time thinking to be an effective main character but he is. This causes the build up to be sluggish and passively sluggish at that but interesting to see how the world has changed.

His sidekick like Kelsier in the first series is more interesting and I enjoyed every scene he was in. He's also one of the new allomancers, with the ability to slow down time outside a bubble he makes and uses it in a very fun and unique way. If there is a sequel I hope to see more of him.

Lastly there's the girl. She's educated, good with a rifle and around when it counts but like some other female protagonists of sanderson's, sort of just falls into line and most attempts to be remarkable are foiled. What doesn't make sense is that Sanderson does good female characters (in my knowledge and opinion) and there are at least two in this book that are interesting and entertaining. They just aren't first choice as the main heroine sometimes but he is improving in character building.

The magic however is better than ever. As I believe Sanderson said, its not what you can do with magic that's interesting, its what you can't. With no actual mistborn in this novel, there is no one to be the living disaster known as VIn . No devastating force on one side or another (but Wax comes close in top shape). It matters much more here how you use your powers than just how much of them or fuel you have.

The narration is what I expected being a mistborn and wheel of time listener, enjoyable and clear. So as long as there's a another book coming at some point (though I'm tiring of in the air endings) I can easily give this book a four out of five.

(PS- Kill all hopes of having any Kandra or Koloss in this book. The Koloss are mentioned but never explained and the Kandra are never hinted at.)

22 of 27 people found this review helpful

  • Elantris

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Jack Garrett
  • Length: 27 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,348
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,121
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,172

Once the godlike rulers of the capital of Arelon, the inhabitans of Elantris have been imprisoned within themselves, unable to die after the city's magic failed years ago. But when a new prince falls victim to the curse, he refuses to accept his fate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What if your body could never heal?

  • By Lore on 09-12-13

Take Atlantis the Lost Empire and add Zombies.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-16-11

The very basic run down is there's a "magical" city that randomly turns people into gods. One day you're a whiny farmboy, the next morning you're a whiny deity with glowing skin, who can write magic spells in the in the air. (There are no whiny farmboys in this book.) Then ten years ago the magical city, Elantris, became much less magical and all the Elantrians became more ghoulish than godlike. Since then the city curses people instead of blessing them and basically turns them into zombies. The zombies get gathered up and thrown into the slum pit Elantris has become and are left there to die.... completely.


My main problem with this book is that a lot of the character's goals get dropped or become irrelevant before they're completed. Also I wish more time would have been spent in Elantris and less on the actions of the other characters for the previously mentioned reason. The princess could have probably been removed with little effect to the plot. Finally the story felt too happy. Sanderson didn't want to make it gritty, but it never got within shouting distance of that till the second half.


This book probably has my favorite opening line of any book I've read so far and the villain is more interesting and more conflicted than I'm use to but after reading Mistborn, Warbreaker and The Way of Kings, Elantris fell short in places.

The narration was enjoyable but it didn't really stand out either.