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Ernest Boyer

Sunnyvale, CA United States
  • 38
  • reviews
  • 33
  • helpful votes
  • 334
  • ratings
  • Renegade

  • Spiral Wars, Book 1
  • By: Joel Shepherd
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 17 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,582
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,474
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,471

One thousand years after Earth was destroyed in an unprovoked attack, humanity has emerged victorious from a series of terrible wars to assure its place in the galaxy. But during celebrations on humanity’s new homeworld, the legendary Captain Pantillo of the battle carrier Phoenix is court-martialed then killed, and his deputy, Lieutenant Commander Erik Debogande, the heir to humanity’s most powerful industrial family, is framed for his murder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Politics?

  • By ochoavida102 on 06-18-17

A Winner! As good as the Expanse Series

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-18

Five stars across the board and, just so you can evaluate the degree to which my opinions mesh with yours, let me make some comparisons. Others have compared the Spiral Wars to the works Alastair Reynolds and Peter F. Hamilton. I think they’re much better than that. I’ve read more of Reynolds and Hamilton than is probably good for me. They were fine for a while, but I grew tired for them. It’s probably just me, but both have long stretches that just bored me. Joel Shepard feels fresh by comparison. Others have noted that the first book in the series starts out slow as the author builds momentum. It does, although even that part held my interest. But then — BAM! — it just takes off. From then on, it’s non-stop — completely riveting. For me a better comparison is, first, to the Expanse Series, written by the two men who go by the pseudonym James S. A. Corey and, to a lesser degree, to the Red Rising trilogy, by Pierce Brown. (I found Brown’s attempt at a fourth book in the series disappointing.) So there you have it. If you loved the Expanse series especially, with its combination of non-stop action and political intrigue, than I think you’ll find the Spiral Wars equally captivating. I did.

  • The Poet

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Buck Schirner
  • Length: 15 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,505
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,640
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,630

Our hero is Jack McEvoy, a Rocky Mountain News crime-beat reporter. As the story opens, Jack's twin brother, a Denver homicide detective, has just killed himself. Or so it seems. But when Jack begins to investigate the phenomenon of police suicides, a disturbing pattern emerges, and soon suspects that a serial murderer is at work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Villain Mystery

  • By Charles Atkinson on 08-10-14

Good, but . . .

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-18

Connelly keeps things moving along as usual, although it did drag a bit at times. Also, by the end, we moved into territory that I simply found unbelievable. Try as I did to suspend my disbelief, I found that I had just too much disbelief to suspend. All in all, I found the book entertaining enough, but far from his best.

  • The Blade Itself

  • By: Joe Abercrombie
  • Narrated by: Steven Pacey
  • Length: 22 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,326
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,854
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,835

Logen Ninefingers, infamous barbarian, has finally run out of luck. Caught in one feud too many, he's on the verge of becoming a dead barbarian - leaving nothing behind him but bad songs, dead friends, and a lot of happy enemies. Nobleman, dashing officer, and paragon of selfishness, Captain Jezal dan Luthar has nothing more dangerous in mind than fleecing his friends at cards and dreaming of glory in the fencing circle. But war is brewing, and on the battlefields of the frozen North they fight by altogether bloodier rules.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Characters drive the story. The Narrator rocks!

  • By Brian Alsobrook on 11-01-16

Not for the Faint of Heart

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-18

Any additional comments?

A man left a broken cripple after two years of brutal torture who becomes a torturer in turn, a superficial fop with a world of privileges who does nothing but complain, the deadliest warrior in the North who will kill even his closest friends when taken by a blind fury -- these are the three characters with which the book begins and with whom we are asked to identify. My first thought was: this book is not for me. I kept waiting for things to improve, for the lines between right and wrong to grow clearer. They did not, but soon I was hooked -- drawn in, fascinated, at times appalled, unable to stop -- driven forward until soon I had finished all three books in the series.

If you want something light and predictable, look elsewhere. Bloody, twisted, and dark, these books are, in the end, a meditation on the prevalence of evil. You're left wondering if anyone can ever truly escape it. It's all part of a story that remains grimly addictive, darkly humorous, unnervingly fascinating.

Throughout it all the narration of Steven Pacey is a wonder. I believe that he is the most skilled and versatile reader I have ever heard. The books are worth a listen for him alone.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Oathbringer

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading, Michael Kramer
  • Length: 55 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 28,254
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 26,612
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 26,560

Dalinar Kholin's Alethi armies won a fleeting victory at a terrible cost. The enemy Parshendi summoned the violent Everstorm, which now sweeps the world with destruction and in its passing awakens the once peaceful and subservient parshmen to the horror of their millennia-long enslavement by humans. While on a desperate flight to warn his family of the threat, Kaladin Stormblessed must come to grips with the fact that the newly kindled anger of the parshmen may be wholly justified.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Strong Storytelling, will upset Kaladin fans

  • By Deana on 11-16-17

Not the best in the series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-18

The first two books in this series are among the finest the genre has to offer. It really does not get much better than "The Book of Kings." At this point in the series, though, the author seems to be slipping. He states at one point that each new book in a series has to up the ante over the works that precede it. In this case I felt that he was trying too hard. Too often things felt simply over-the-top, with arbitrary plot turns, and the laws by which the world was being governed pushed to the point of incredulity within the context they were meant to function. It was still pretty entertaining, but also exhausting and not nearly as convincing as the earlier books had been. With luck Sanderson will get back on track for the next volume.

  • The Experience of God

  • Being, Consciousness, Bliss
  • By: David Bentley Hart
  • Narrated by: Tom Pile
  • Length: 12 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 119
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 114
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109

Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion "God" frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word "God” functions in the world’s great theistic faiths.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The clearest thinking I have heard in ages.

  • By Carlos Miranda on 06-17-15

A Tour de Force

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-18

Formidable, compelling, and masterfully written, this book aggressively confronts the dismal and sadly bankrupt worldview of mechanistic materialism in all its permutations. In the process it constructs a powerful and multifaceted case for God as the only truly convincing account of reality. This is a highly sophisticated and rigorous work -- a true joy to anyone who wishes to unpack the foundation of their faith and a devastating challenge to any atheist with the intellectual gifts to approach it. My one qualification is that it does not in fact do much to incorporate views of God from different faiths, despite its stated intention to do so. Other faiths are quoted at times, especially works from Sufi writers and from the Upanishads, but only in passing, used to add their affirmations to points already made. The issues are approached almost elusively from the perspective of Western assumptions and thought. That it does very, very well, though. I suppose it would be greedy to ask for more.

  • The Theology of Grace

  • By: Rev. Brian McDermott SJ DrTheol
  • Narrated by: Rev. Brian McDermott SJ DrTheol
  • Length: 5 hrs and 57 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

How do you understand Grace and sin? How are they spiritually connected? In the Western church, the understanding of grace, sin, and God's good creation has been shaped by theologians responding to the challenges specific to their times while using the resources of theology, philosophy, and personal religious experience. With the help of Father Brian McDermott, SJ, you will be able to address these and other questions as well as gain a deeper understanding of the dynamics of God's grace.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Learned, Compassionate, and Wise

  • By Ernest Boyer on 03-02-18

Learned, Compassionate, and Wise

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-18

I took several courses from Prof. Brian McDermott, SJ, including his course on grace, during the time he taught at Weston School of Theology and I was a graduate student at Harvard. He is among the best teachers I ever had. That comes through to a certain degree in these lectures (and lectures are what they are), but not as fully as I would have hoped. The lectures examine the Christian understanding of grace in the Old Testament, Paul, Eastern Orthodox thought, Augustine, Julian of Norwich, Aquinas, and Karl Rahner, as well as from the standpoint of Feminist Theology, Liberation Theology, ecology, and world religions. Each of these must be treated briefly, of course, but Prof. McDermott still manages to bring great insight, balance, compassion, and wisdom to every topic, making this an excellent introduction to a fascinating subject.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Living Without a Why

  • Meister Eckhart's Mysticism
  • By: Prof. Charlotte Radler PhD
  • Narrated by: Prof. Charlotte Radler PhD
  • Length: 2 hrs and 48 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 11

Encounter one of the most influential figures in Christian spirituality. "To be full of things is to be empty of God. To be empty of things is to be full of God." Said by Meister Eckhart, these words encapsulate the insight of a timeless philosopher, theologian, author, preacher, and mystic. Eckhart has contributed spiritual direction and knowledge to generations of Christians, yet his wisdom remains unknown to many.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Surprisingly good

  • By Ernest Boyer on 03-02-18

Surprisingly good

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-18

I found this to be an expectantly fine introduction to the rich and complex thought of Meister Eckhart. The author managers in the course of nine short lectures to give an overview of the wealth and depth of this great thinker. The narration does not have the polish of a professional reader, but that is easy to overlook. For anyone interested in the subject, this is a great place to begin.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Barking to the Choir

  • The Power of Radical Kinship
  • By: Gregory Boyle
  • Narrated by: Gregory Boyle
  • Length: 7 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 634
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 584
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 581

A moving example of unconditional love in difficult times, the best-selling author of Tattoos on the Heart, Father Gregory Boyle, shares what three decades of working with gangs in Los Angeles has taught him about faith, compassion, and the enduring power of radical kinship.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Kinship in your life

  • By Rose Anna Kurowski on 12-07-17

The Healing Power of Love

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-17

Although not quit up there with Tattoos on the Heart, Fr. Greg Boyle's most recent account of his work with former gang members is still excellent. Really a series of essays, Boyle's latest is much more lighthearted, often quite funny. It is more a celebration of the exquisite wonder of how tender and loving his homeboys become as they blossom in the rich combination of human acceptance and divine love than a story of the tragic toll of the gang life. The stories are plentiful and poignant, but seemed briefer than in the earlier volume. I would have liked to have heard more. That's the only drawback, though. Wise, insightful, touching, amusing, compelling -- it doesn't get much better than this.

  • The Dark Forest

  • By: Cixin Liu, Joel Martinsen - translator
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
  • Length: 22 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,998
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,571
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,567

This near-future trilogy is the first chance for English-speaking listeners to experience this multiple-award-winning phenomenon from Cixin Liu, China's most beloved science fiction author. In The Dark Forest, Earth is reeling from the revelation of a coming alien invasion - in just four centuries' time. The aliens' human collaborators may have been defeated, but the presence of the sophons, the subatomic particles that allow Trisolaris instant access to all human information, means that Earth's defense plans are totally exposed to the enemy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing

  • By Amazon Customer on 11-25-15

Sets a New Benchmark.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-17

"The Dark Forest" takes science fiction to a whole new level. "The Three Body Problem," the first book in the series, was flawed. It suffered from amateurish passages and poor narration. This second book in the series is still weakened by two-dimensional characters, but when it comes to everything else -- story, concepts, imagination, and narration -- "The Dark Forest" leaves all but a tiny handful of science fiction novels far in the dust. A new classic, I suspect that it will become the standard by which all future work is judged. Remarkable! Read it.

  • The Three-Body Problem

  • By: Cixin Liu
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 13 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,428
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,598
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,606

Set against the backdrop of China’s Cultural Revolution, a secret military project sends signals into space to establish contact with aliens. An alien civilization on the brink of destruction captures the signal and plans to invade Earth. Meanwhile, on Earth, different camps start forming, planning to either welcome the superior beings and help them take over a world seen as corrupt, or to fight against the invasion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • They create a computer using a 30 million man Army

  • By Josh P on 12-07-14

Mixed feelings

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-28-17

There is much of value here, truly — the historical roots in the cultural revolution, the hard science, the probing philosophical questions, the wild plot premises. The book does have weaknesses too: two-dimensional characters, a number of strangely amateurish narrative elements, and on top of everything, a cartoonishly over-the-top reader. The strengths definitely outweigh the defects, though. All in all, I’m going to stick with the series. It already feels like one-of-a-kind. Apparently it gets better.