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Joao Coelho

  • 21
  • reviews
  • 71
  • helpful votes
  • 129
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  • The Dictator's Handbook

  • Why Bad Behavior Is Almost Always Good Politics
  • By: Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, Alastair Smith
  • Narrated by: Johnny Heller
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,532
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,173
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,155

For 18 years, Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith have been revolutionizing the study of politics by turning conventional wisdom on its head. They start from a single assertion: Leaders do whatever keeps them in power. They don't care about the "national interest" - or even their subjects - unless they have to. This clever and accessible book shows that the difference between tyrants and democrats is just a convenient fiction.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Think you understand politics, think again!

  • By Michael on 07-01-14

The hard reality of politics

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-19

A must read, even if you're not into politics. Maybe not what we want to know, but what we need to know.
Helped me understand better the world we live in like a book hasn't done in a while. Very highly recommend.
Excellent reading performance helps a lot.

  • Spaghetti Code

  • Detangling Life and Work with Programmer Wisdom
  • By: Christoph C. Cemper
  • Narrated by: Adam Dubeau
  • Length: 5 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    1.5 out of 5 stars 3

Programmers are some of the least-known, understood, or inquired-of people on the planet. One of Christoph C. Cemper’s goals, in his audiobook, Spaghetti Code: Detangling Life and Work with Programmer Wisdom, is to bring more recognition to this vast group of professionals and the amazing work they perform. Now, from the vantage of more than three decades of being a part of the programmer community, Cemper relates his stories from the front lines of programming.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Terrible

  • By R ANTHONY KOLSTEE on 03-18-18

Talks a whole lot about nothing

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-18

As a software developer, I decided to get this book without even reading reviews first. Was very interested in seeing how the author would relate software development with life lessons or maybe hear some of his stories as a software developer that I could relate to.

Well... neither happened. The author just puts a bunch of random thoughts together and then tries to relate them to software development. Doesn't make sense, most of what he says I've heard it somewhere else better explained and it's too wordy and often repeats itself.

Whether you're in software or not, I recommend you stay away from this book. You learn nothing and you waste your time.

  • We Learn Nothing

  • Essays
  • By: Tim Kreider
  • Narrated by: Tim Kreider
  • Length: 6 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,688
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,442
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,435

In We Learn Nothing, satirical cartoonist Tim Kreider turns his funny, brutally honest eye to the dark truths of the human condition, asking big questions about human-sized problems: What if you survive a brush with death and it doesn't change you? Why do we fall in love with people we don't even like? How do you react when someone you've known for years unexpectedly changes genders?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very good

  • By jason russo on 06-06-15

Great short stories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-12-16

Very well written and read. This is one of those occasions where I really envy the author for being able to express his thoughts with such wonderful words, expressions, analogies, etc.. making great use of all communication tools.
Also, seems like we're at a similar age and many of his experiences are similar to mine (others definitely not) and hearing those put so eloquently made me feel more normal :)
Highly recommend, especially if your over 40 and have enough bagage to better relate to what the author is talking about.

  • A Short History of Nearly Everything

  • By: Bill Bryson
  • Narrated by: Richard Matthews
  • Length: 18 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,881
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,554
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,508

Bill Bryson has been an enormously popular author both for his travel books and for his books on the English language. Now, this beloved comic genius turns his attention to science. Although he doesn't know anything about the subject (at first), he is eager to learn, and takes information that he gets from the world's leading experts and explains it to us in a way that makes it exciting and relevant.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Six stars

  • By mark harris on 12-24-16

The title says it all

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-15

The book goes over areas that I would probably never have gone to by reading/listening otherwise, such as geology, astronomy, DNA, etc. and does a really good job at keeping them insteresting and even funny. Big kudos for the narrator as well who keeps the tone jovial.
Very glad I took the time to read it. At times the book makes you feel insignificant with so much that is out there in space and time: we're small, live for small amount of time and we're lucky we're even here :) but hey, that's how it is.

  • You Are Not So Smart

  • Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself
  • By: David McRaney
  • Narrated by: Don Hagen
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,476
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,036
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,023

An entertaining illumination of the stupid beliefs that make us feel wise. You believe you are a rational, logical being who sees the world as it really is, but journalist David McRaney is here to tell you that you're as deluded as the rest of us. But that's OK - delusions keep us sane. You Are Not So Smart is a celebration of self-delusion. It's like a psychology class, with all the boring parts taken out, and with no homework. Based on the popular blog of the same name, You Are Not So Smart collects more than 46 of the lies we tell ourselves everyday.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It's official, I'm an idiot

  • By Christopher on 07-04-12

Great summary of years of research

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-12

Any additional comments?

This book is filled with great information about how we humans work based on many different researches throughout the world and the years. Some topics are covered by other books in greater depth, but I found that here you have just the right amount of explanation to understand what's going on and with a bit of humour to add to it.If you read other books on Human behavior and how the brain works, some info here may be repeated, but if not, I highly recommend you listen to this and you'll be surprised at how we deceive ourselves in so many different fronts.The only thing I wish there was is a PDF with a summary of the 46 chapters (maybe just the chapter name, even). It would greatly help remembering everything we learned.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Onward

  • How Starbucks Fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul
  • By: Howard Schultz, Joanne Gordon
  • Narrated by: Stephen Bowlby
  • Length: 12 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,423
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,178
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,174

In 2008, Howard Schultz, the president and chairman of Starbucks, made the unprecedented decision to return as CEO, eight years after he stepped down from daily oversight of the company to become chairman. Concerned that Starbucks had lost its way, Schultz was determined to help it return to its core values and restore not only its financial health, but also its soul.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting, but a bit annoying

  • By Carla on 06-13-11

Interesting but longer than it needed to be

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-12

I'm a fan of Starbucks and have great respect for what they achieved.
I was aware of the troubles they went through in 2008-2010 and it's good to hear from the CEO's perspective what happened and how they turned around. Gives us good insight on how successful CEO's think and operate and we get a better understanding of what Starbucks is about.
That said, this book could be about half the lenght... at times it goes on and on and on about things that are not relevant. For example at one point Mr Schultz rambles on about what customers might be doing at a store when the point he was trying to make was something else altogether.
Still, a good story about Starbucks' history. Enjoyed it.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Ghost in the Wires

  • My Adventures as the World’s Most Wanted Hacker
  • By: Kevin Mitnick, William L. Simon
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 13 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,529
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,700
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,717

Kevin Mitnick was the most elusive computer break-in artist in history. He accessed computers and networks at the world’s biggest companies—and however fast the authorities were, Mitnick was faster, sprinting through phone switches, computer systems, and cellular networks. He spent years skipping through cyberspace, always three steps ahead and labeled unstoppable.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great listen for tech fans

  • By Mikeyxote on 06-01-12

Riveting story, the way it's supposed to be read!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-12

The story of this guy is amazing. There are some technical terms but not too much (I'm an IT guy and recognized most of what he was talking about). He makes it sound simple, but it's not. Some of the things he went through are unbelievable.
One big point of this book is the reader's performance. I think it's the best so far that I've listened. Always appropriate to the situation, without overdoing it.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The History of Classical Music

  • By: Richard Fawkes
  • Narrated by: Robert Powell
  • Length: 5 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 289
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 144
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 145

From Gregorian Chant to Henryk Gorecki, the first living classical composer to get into the pop album charts, here is the fascinating story of over a thousand years of Western classical music and the composers who have sought to express in music the deepest of human feelings and emotions. Also available: The History of Opera.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • highly recommend

  • By Walter on 02-09-04

Delightful to listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-12

This book was a break from the usual books I listen. It was great to learn more about a topic I wansn't very familiar with and with music every now and then.
Very good read, just wish the author would include more music to exemplify what he's talking about, especially when talking about the techniques used by composers.
I think I now have a better appreciation of classical music and understand better what the composers were trying to do. Recommended listen!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Positivity

  • Groundbreaking Research Reveals How to Embrace the Hidden Strength of Positive Emotions, Overcome Negativity, and Thrive
  • By: Barbara Fredrickson
  • Narrated by: Kimberly Farr
  • Length: 9 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 276
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 182
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 179

World renowned researcher Dr. Barbara Fredrickson gives you the lab-tested tools necessary to create a healthier, more vibrant, and flourishing life through a process she calls "the upward spiral." With Positivity, you'll learn to see new possibilities, bounce back from setbacks, connect with others, and become the best version of yourself.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Good content, poorly delivered

  • By Joao Coelho on 12-13-11

Good content, poorly delivered

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-13-11

A bit ironic that I'm saying negative things on a book about positivity, but oh well..
The content of the book is overall ok and gets better towards the end. I think it could be a lot shorter as the author sometimes goes into examples that take too long and are not always as applicable to the point she's trying to make as I would like. Other books based on scientific studies (such as Dan Ariely's) also present studies but in a much clearer and funnier way, which helps us readers enjoy and remember more.
Also the narrator seems like she's reading a fairy tale.
I stuck through the whole thing and learned a few things, but overall it wasn't a ver good experience, in my opinion.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • A Whole New Mind (Live)

  • By: Daniel Pink
  • Narrated by: Daniel Pink
  • Length: 1 hr and 13 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 300
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 145
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 146

Just as we were getting used to the Information Age, Daniel Pink tells us that it is ending. With it goes our focus on charts, statistics, and linear thinking. Traditional "left-brain" activities, like logic, analysis, and repetitive production, are being turned over to robots, computers, and offshore labor. The valued skills of the 21st Century will be those of the right brain: empathy, design, synthesis, and contextual thinking.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A good reminder of the book

  • By Joao Coelho on 12-01-11

A good reminder of the book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-11

Read the book about a year ago and decided to listen to this talk instead of listening to the whole book again. It's a great talk and makes the same arguments as in the book in a succint way. Great complement to the book and very funny too, which makes it easier to listen and remember.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful