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  • Big Girl

  • How I Gave Up Dieting and Got a Life
  • By: Kelsey Miller
  • Narrated by: Kelsey Miller
  • Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 562
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 514
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 513

At 29, Kelsey Miller had done it all: crash diets, healthy diets, and nutritionist-prescribed "eating plans", which are diets that you pay more money for. She'd been fighting her un-thin body since early childhood and, after a lifetime of failure, finally hit bottom. No diet could transform her body or her life. There was no shortcut to skinny salvation. She'd dug herself into this hole, and now it was time to climb out of it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Quirky and Oddly Inspiring AutoBio

  • By Gillian on 01-28-16

Worth the listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-18

I have seen this book on the site before. It was on a sale and I bought it. The idea of intuitive eating and living for health rather than the perfect body intrigues me. I know so many people who beat themselves up if they dare to have pizza or ice cream. Giving yourself permission to have that goody sometimes makes sense. Maybe we all won't be svelte but will be thinner and happier. The author was very likable and read her work well, which is not always the case. This is not a diet book but rather one woman's coming to terms with herself and realizing that there is more to life thean watching each mouthful. I plan to learn more about this subject.

  • The District Nurses of Victory Walk

  • The District Nurse, Book 1
  • By: Annie Groves
  • Narrated by: Alex Tregear
  • Length: 11 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12

Alice Lake has arrived in London from Liverpool to start her training as a District Nurse, but her journey has been far from easy. Her parents think that she should settle down and get married, but she has already had her heart broken once and isn’t about to make the same mistake again. Alice and her best friend, Edith, are based in the East End, but before they’ve even got their smart new uniforms on, war breaks out, and Hitler’s bombs are raining down on London.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love And Friendship At The Start Of War

  • By DHackney on 06-20-18

Interesting slice of London at the beginning of WW

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-18

I've always been interested in the homefront both here and in other places (most of the world) affected by the 2nd World War. I also find the work of women at the time interesting. The author brought these girls to life. The story focuses mainly on three young women as nurses in a poor part of London just before and during the first 9 months or so of the war. I'm hoping there will be more in the series. Young women were first making their own way and were quite daring in the eyes of some. Yet most people had great respect for the nurses. If only there was the level of caring in health care today.

The narrator was absolutely lovely and it was easy to keep the characters straight as the girl from Liverpool sounded much different than the Scottish nursing supervisor or the working class people. Was it trememdously deep? No, but it was obvious that the author knew much of what happened in the early days of the war in Britain. It was a delightful weekend read.

  • The Foundling

  • The True Story of a Kidnapping, a Family Secret, and My Search for the Real Me
  • By: Paul Joseph Fronczak, Alex Tresniowski
  • Narrated by: Kirby Heyborne
  • Length: 11 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 583
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 534
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 539

The Foundling tells the incredible and inspiring true story of Paul Fronczak, a man who recently discovered via a DNA test that he was not who he thought he was - and set out to solve two 50-year-old mysteries at once. Along the way he upturned the genealogy industry, unearthed his family's deepest secrets, and broke open the second longest cold-case in US history, all in a desperate bid to find out who he really is.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Prepare yourself for a journey that will take you to shocking places!

  • By OUChris on 04-04-17

A true story which reads like a mystery

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-18

My daughter recommended this book to me. Her husband has been on a quest to find his adoptive parents. He loves his adoptive family, but medical concerns have led him to investigate. Like Franczek he was able to locate some family members. This story is fascinating as it doesn't wrap everything up neatly.

Paul was kidnapped a day and a half after birth from a Chicago hospital in 1964. He was (or at least they thought it was him) some 13 months later. As he grew up he felt like he didn't belong with his family, though he loved them.His story of search and discovery is fascinating. Not all his questions were answered; he is still searching for some things. But it kept me and my husband listening during a long driving trip. The narrator did a good job; he was straightforward and easy to follow. We highly recommend this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Runaway Children

  • By: Sandy Taylor
  • Narrated by: Alison Campbell
  • Length: 11 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30

London, 1942: Thirteen-year-old Nell and five-year-old Olive are being sent away from home to escape the devastation of the East End during the Blitz. Leaving behind their beloved mother and brothers, they don’t know if they will ever see them again. As the sisters adjust to their new life in a close-knit Welsh village, they gradually find hope in the friendships they make. And Nell kindles a special bond with fellow evacuee Jimmy, who makes her smile even at the hardest of times. But when little Olive’s safety is threatened, Nell makes a decision that will change their lives forever. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely Wonderful

  • By Rosemarie on 07-20-18

Love and loyalty win

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-18

This is the 2nd book by Sandy Taylor I have read. The audio quality of When We Danced at the End of the Pier was not as good. I was told that using enhanced audio would help. I changed my download to that and there was no problem The story is that of two sisters, five and thirteen who are evacuated to Wales during WWII. Their brother who is supposed to go with them refuses. Their mum and very new baby brother remain also in London. The two girls experience first welcome and love, and then a frightful billet with a nasty old woman and her disgusting son. They escape and travel around, always sticking together and supporting one another. One would think that the older is always looking out for her little sister, but little Olive is sweet, honest and loving. Sometimes it is she who has the bright ideas.

I loved the fact that these two stayed together through the whole war and triumphed in the end. We forget that thousands upon thousands of kids were separated from their families during the war in the U.K. For some it was the best thing which ever happened to them. For others it was a nightmare which never left them. This is not a profound story in many ways, but its gentleness and attention to detail made it a lovely read. The narrator was good, and could sound extremely young sometimes. Either she really is, or can just get into the characters. Her accents were good and she obviously liked the girls she was voicing. It's a lovely read for a dreary day. It will help restore your faith in people if you are feeling a bit jaded.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Bearing False Witness

  • Debunking Centuries of Anti-Catholic History
  • By: Rodney Stark
  • Narrated by: Paul Boehmer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 190
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 172

As we all know, and as many of our well-established textbooks have argued for decades, the Inquisition was one of the most frightening and bloody chapters in Western history, Pope Pius XII was anti-Semitic and rightfully called "Hitler's Pope", the Dark Ages were a stunting of the progress of knowledge to be redeemed only by the secular spirit of the Enlightenment, and the religious Crusades were an early example of the rapacious Western thirst for riches and power. But what if these long-held beliefs were all wrong?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enlightening

  • By jjdoctor on 12-10-16

A very worthwhile read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-18

I heard Rodney Stark on a radio interview and was impressed with his passion for history. This is a book debunking popular myths about the Catholic church. Before I say more, I would note that Stark is not Catholic. He is, however a serious historian. I read his book God's Batalions a number of years ago and forgot he was the author.

Stark tackles a number of issues, writing as a Protestant which makes it really good. He tackles the myths about anti science, the inquisition, and the view that Catholics supported slavery. Stark is a religion professor at Baylor and is very readable and clear. His reason for writing this book is the misperceptions of many who think they know the Catholic beliefs but rely on popular authors such as Karen Armstron or Garry Wills or worse. I appreciated his clear prose and the honesty of this book. For example, he goes back to St. Thomas Aquinas on the matter of slavery. He also debunks the myth that the church did nothing during the Dark ages. He is forthright about the wrongs in the church, about which any knowledgeable Catholic would agree.

I recommend this book to both Catholics and those who are not, but willing to read a mostly positive, but really honest treatment of this subject. Sometimes I don't like the narrator in other things, but he did a fine job on this one.

  • In the Land of Invisible Women

  • A Female Doctor's Journey in the Saudi Kingdom
  • By: Qanta A. Ahmed MD
  • Narrated by: Nicola Barber
  • Length: 14 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 166
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 144
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 146

Unexpectedly denied a visa to remain in the United States, Qanta Ahmed, a young British Muslim doctor, becomes an outcast in motion. On a whim, she accepts an exciting position in Saudi Arabia. This is not just a new job; this is a chance at adventure in an exotic land she thinks she understands, a place she hopes she will belong. What she discovers is vastly different. The Kingdom is a world apart, a land of unparalleled contrast. She finds rejection and scorn in the places she believed would most embrace her.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Could have been so much more

  • By Claire on 04-21-13

Understanding our Saudi Sisters

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-18

I have read many books about women in the Middle East and this was excellent. It was written by a British born, American trained Pakistani Muslim doctor. She moves to Saudi Arabia in 1999 and works in the intensive care and emergency departments of a hospital. Her observations of life there is honest and sometimes heart wrenching. She never was swathed from head to toe before and finds it oppressive and annoying. She makes dear friends and loves certain things about the country and finds others abhorrent. Her description of her Haj pilgrimage was beautiful and very honest. I couldn't put the book down. Nicola Barber did a beautiful job of narrating this book. The bonus interview with Qanta Ahmed at the end was wonderful and very informative.

I recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn more about how lucky women in the west are compared to there sisters in some other countries. I appreciated the candidness and ability of the author to separate good from bad. The part about the 9/11 attack and the reaction there was eye opening. I would recommend this highly!

  • The Worst Hard Time

  • The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl
  • By: Timothy Egan
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor, Ken Burns (introduction)
  • Length: 11 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,825
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,093
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,105

The dust storms that terrorized America's High Plains in the darkest years of the Depression were like nothing ever seen before or since, and the stories of the people that held on have never been fully told. Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times journalist and author Timothy Egan follows a half-dozen families and their communities through the rise and fall of the region.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Fascinating History

  • By Sara on 02-02-14

We sure learned a lot!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-17

My husband and I listened to this book on one of our long drives to see family. Patrick Lawler is a good nonfiction reader, but when he does women's or children's voices he sounds a bit shrill and overdone. Other than that he was good. The story is incredible. Egan uses the stories of a number of people or families who survived or died during the protracted dust bowl. If you think the dust bowl was just Oklahoma, think again. Many states were affected and the toll on people's lives and finances was horrendous. We both felt Egan made us part of the story. He tells not just the fate of these and others, but the likely reason the disaster happened. If you are interested in history as we are, this is really worth a listen. I will never think of this time in our country's history the same way again.

  • When Crickets Cry

  • By: Charles Martin
  • Narrated by: Adam Verner
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 848
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 783
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 778

A man with a painful past. A child with a doubtful future. And a shared journey toward healing for both their hearts... It begins on the shaded town square in a sleepy Southern town. A spirited seven-year-old has a brisk business at her lemonade stand. But the little girl’s pretty yellow dress can’t quite hide the ugly scar on her chest. The stranger understands more about it than he wants to admit. And the beat-up bread truck careening around the corner with its radio blaring is about to change the trajectory of both their lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a Surprise!

  • By Cricket on 05-06-12

A really memorable book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-16-16

The author writes books from a Christian perspective but which never preach. His characters are real and struggle and screw up and all the things real people do. This story of a doctor who has stopped being a doctor because of a traumatic event (I don't want to spoil anything) is faced with a situation where his skill as a prominent heart surgeon is needed.

The story kept me totally hooked. The little girl is really captivating and her aunt, who cares for her is a wonderful survivor. The ending took me by surprise. Don't quit as I almost do. Read to the end and the whole thing will make sense. The narrator was good but I didn't think a 5 star. But the book is lovely and I'll read it again.

  • Broken Angels

  • By: Gemma Liviero
  • Narrated by: Nico Evers-Swindell, Emily Foster
  • Length: 13 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,762
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,592
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,587

Imprisoned in the Lodz Ghetto, Elsi discovers her mother's desperate attempt to end her pregnancy and comes face-to-face with the impossibility of their situation. Risking her own life, Elsi joins a resistance group to sabotage the regime. Blonde, blue-eyed Matilda is wrenched from her family in Romania and taken to Germany, where her captors attempt to mold her into the perfect Aryan child. Spirited and brave, she must inspire hope in the other stolen children to make her dreams of escape a reality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • loved this book.

  • By James R Terry, II on 05-17-16

A compassionate WW2 German

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-16

Broken Angels tells the story of a young German doctor and his meeting with first a Jewish girl from the Warsaw ghetto and a young girl who has been taken as one who is almost Aryan and able to be educated as a good German though she is Polish.

His compassion and horror about these and others persecuted and used for experiments by the Nazis leads him to live a courageous and double life. The narration by three different voices lends a real poignancy to this book. I love this author and the performance. It was both beautiful and very hard to read but I will remember this book for a long time.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • The Canal Bridge

  • A Novel of Ireland, Love, and the First World War
  • By: Tom Phelan
  • Narrated by: Paul Nugent
  • Length: 8 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28

In 1913, before there is a rumor of war in Europe, Matthias Wrenn and Con Hatchel, lifelong friends from Ballyrannel in the Irish midlands, decide to see the world at the expense of the king of England and join the British army. A year later, while en route to India, their troop ship is recalled and they soon find themselves in the European slaughterhouse that was World War I.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful, disturbing and unforgettable

  • By Kathy on 05-25-16

Beautiful, disturbing and unforgettable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-25-16

I read Lies the Mushroom Pickers Told with my husband on a previous car trip. We laughed and thoroughly enjoyed it. So I took a chance on this book. Phelan is a master storyteller, right up there with Frank Delaney and a few others. The story is told from multiple viewpoints and goes back and forth in time. Yet this ultimately works. Each character is finely crafted and becomes someone you love or loathe.

There is a realism about the war which is upsetting and sometimes nauseating. Yet it is not done for sensationalism. Phelan tells of the horror of war for the young men and women who lived and died because of the stupid decisions of their superiors. It is painful, and at times I wanted to stop listening. I could not do that; the book was so riveting. If you have trouble keeping many characters straight you may not like this book, but we both loved it. I can't get it out of my mind, nor can my husband. We both agreed that there is an innocence that the main characters maintain throughout in spite of what they have experienced. We got a different take on the Irish uprising of 1916 from this book. Compared to the horror of France and Belgium, that was a lark in the park.

Paul Nugent was such a phenomenal narrator that I'm looking for books he has narrated. He differentiated between characters, doing a terrified Kitty at 17, applying for a job at the big frarm, to an officious general in the British army. There were Cockney, Welsh, Northern and midland Irish and more among the accents he did effortlessly. I am in awe of this guy! He can read to me any time! :)

Can you give a narrator more than five stars?

2 of 2 people found this review helpful