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Erik N

Austin, TX United States
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  • 140
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  • 81
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  • Pet Sematary

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Michael C. Hall
  • Length: 15 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,567
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,191
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,167

When Dr. Louis Creed takes a new job and moves his family to the idyllic, rural town of Ludlow, Maine, this new beginning seems too good to be true. Yet despite Ludlow's tranquility, there's an undercurrent of danger that lingers...like the graveyard in the woods near the Creeds' home, where generations of children have buried their beloved pets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding in Every Regard

  • By Alexander Lambert on 04-10-18

Not his scariest, but most horrifying

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-18

Where does Pet Sematary rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Definitely on the “I feel my credit was well spent” side.

What did you like best about this story?

It was just an overall engrossing story well told.

What about Michael C. Hall’s performance did you like?

His pacing and voices were perfect.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Oh no no no no. You need to take breaks with this one. It is just so unrelentingly dark.

Any additional comments?

An odd mix of characters you never love, situations that are just overwhelmingly awful for them, doom rained upon them unrelentingly, King’s bad habit of finding a phrase he worries like a dog with a bone (“hey ho let’s go” and “Oz the Gweat and Tewwible” here). And yet one of his better books, one that moves forward at a good pace and holds you. The ideas behind it, the sense of mortality, it all just creates a dread.

  • Creativity, Inc.

  • Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration
  • By: Ed Catmull, Amy Wallace
  • Narrated by: Peter Altschuler
  • Length: 12 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,257
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,402
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,364

Creativity, Inc. is a book for managers who want to lead their employees to new heights, a manual for anyone who strives for originality, and the first-ever, all-access trip into the nerve center of Pixar Animation - into the meetings, postmortems, and "Braintrust" sessions where some of the most successful films in history are made. It is, at heart, a book about how to build a creative culture - but it is also, as Pixar co-founder and president Ed Catmull writes, "an expression of the ideas that I believe make the best in us possible."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A good listen... If you speed up the player

  • By andrea gini on 10-06-15

Good but not the whole story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-18

Would you listen to Creativity, Inc. again? Why?

No, the reading was just okay. At first I gave it slack, as I figured it was an author reading. Hiring another narrator, and coming up with this guy? Not so great. Listening at 1.25x helped a lot, but still not a great reading.

What other book might you compare Creativity, Inc. to and why?

I don’t usually listen to business books. So, nothing really.

What three words best describe Peter Altschuler’s performance?

Not that great

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There were moments discussing the movies I loved where the book really had emotional punch.

Any additional comments?

Catmull ignoring some pretty serious issues really damages this book for me. There is no question that the big day of ideas at Pixar ended up with questions about Lasseter’s behavior, but here it is spun into “people complained that they needed more John” rather than “I need less of John’s hand sliding up my leg during meetings.” His constant insistence on being open and honest is undone by what we now know about bad behavior he almost certainly was aware of. Also, if he mentioned someone telling a story again, I was gonna scream. It’s a worthwhile read but so much of it is thrown into a negative light when you realize that his insistence on candor does not extend to his own book.

  • Alien: Out of the Shadows

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Tim Lebbon, Dirk Maggs
  • Narrated by: Rutger Hauer, Corey Johnson, Matthew Lewis, and others
  • Length: 4 hrs and 28 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,547
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,901
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,887

As a child, Chris Hooper dreamed of monsters. But in deep space, he found only darkness and isolation. Then, on planet LV178, he and his fellow miners discovered a storm-scoured, sand-blasted hell - and trimonite, the hardest material known to man. When a shuttle crashes into the mining ship Marion, the miners learn that there was more than trimonite deep in the caverns. There was evil, hibernating and waiting for suitable prey.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • a work that I highly recommend

  • By AudioBook Reviewer on 05-02-16

Pretty good

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-18

What did you like best about Alien: Out of the Shadows? What did you like least?

The atmospherics were effective. It was a fairly well made audio drama. As much as I liked Rutger Hauer, his use as a sort of a Greek Chorus went too far. Though I understand why he was interjected, too much of what he said was telling us what we knew. It got old.

If you’ve listened to books by Tim Lebbon and Dirk Maggs before, how does this one compare?

I haven’t. I probably won’t again.

Which scene was your favorite?

The scenes of discovery in the mine were a hint at something bigger, and I wanted more like this.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

Nahhh

Any additional comments?

Some of the dialog is from the George Lucas school of “no one talks like this, it’s too stilted.” There were some thuddingly bad lines that made me cringe for the actors.

  • Gather ‘Round the Sound

  • Holiday Stories from Beloved Authors and Great Performers Across the Globe
  • By: Paulo Coelho, Yvonne Morrison, Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Angele Masters, Daniel Frances Berenson, Magda Szubanski, and others
  • Length: 1 hr and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 5,195
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,561
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 4,559

2017 has been a monumental year for Audible, having just celebrated our 20th anniversary, a milestone that would have never been possible without our wonderful and loyal listeners. One of our major commitments is bringing new and diverse audio experiences to our members, so this year, as our gift to you, we pulled together a collection that reflects a little bit of everything we’ve been up to recently.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Holidays

  • By ZOE R on 12-12-17

Only barely worth free

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-18

What would have made Gather ‘Round the Sound better?

Perhaps if they hadn’t tried to do This American Life with the Santa letter part... it was not of that caliber. Completely eliminating the improv bit, which was simply dull and banal. Even if they did all the work to get the recording, it is so dull and barely on topic that this would have been improved if they’d just gotten rid of it. Making it last ended the whole thing on a sour note.

What was most disappointing about the authors’s story?

The terrible terrible improv that was more about chopping vegetables than about the season. I’ve seen a lot of improv, and these guys are either not good or were having a very off night.

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

The inclusion of The Signal Man was good. Though people complain that it isn’t a holiday story, they are forgetting that in Dickens’ time Christmas was a time for ghost stories.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Gather ‘Round the Sound?

Obviously, the improv group.

Any additional comments?

It was free. If you are considering buying, there are probably better ways to spend your audiobook budget.

  • Lovecraft's Monsters

  • By: Neil Gaiman, Ellen Datlow (Editor)
  • Narrated by: Bernard Clark
  • Length: 15 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 560
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 514
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 512

Prepare to meet the wicked progeny of the master of modern horror. In Lovecraft's Monsters, H. P. Lovecraft's most famous creations--Cthulhu, Shoggoths, Deep Ones, Elder Things, Yog-Sothoth, and more--appear in all their terrifying glory. Each story is a gripping new take on a classic Lovecraftian creature. Contributors include such literary luminaries as Neil Gaiman, Joe R. Lansdale, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Karl Edward Wagner, Elizabeth Bear, and Nick Mamatas.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The ones that were good were really good!!!

  • By Manuel on 09-14-16

Incredibly uneven

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-17

Stories ranged from pointless to great. A couple of really awful poems. Surprisingly, I deeply disliked Gaiman's story and almost returned this. Laird Barron and I will never click, I found his passable but frustrating. One promising piece ended up being a setup for a contrived pun. The final two stories were worth hanging on for. Bless Joe Lansdale for a really great horror story, definitely the best here and one I could say has only a tenuous mythic connection. Good performance outside of an overwrought reading of the introduction.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Made to Kill

  • A Novel
  • By: Adam Christopher
  • Narrated by: Dan Bittner
  • Length: 6 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 44

It was just another Tuesday morning when she walked into the office - young, as I suspected they all might be, another dark brunette with some assistance and enough eye black to match up to Cleopatra. And who am I? I'm Ray, the world's last robot, famed and feared in equal measure, which suits me just fine - after all, the last place you'd expect to find Hollywood's best hit man is in the plain light of day.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Great ideas squandered

  • By Erik N on 03-19-16

Great ideas squandered

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-16

Would you try another book from Adam Christopher and/or Dan Bittner?

Bittner yes. He's a good reader. The occasional weird pronunciation, but strong characterization.

What was most disappointing about Adam Christopher’s story?

Lots of great ideas that never really matter to the story. A character who has his memory reset every 24 hours, and yet this is barely an issue and not really a plot point. It's like if Memento only bothered with the memory issue sporadically. The detective thing is a bit lost as the hero just waits for people to tell him everything. The time period is rarely used as a setting,

What does Dan Bittner bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

I'm not sure I would have liked the main character without the performance.

Could you see Made to Kill being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

Please no. There are so many more properties that deserve being made into tv shows.

Any additional comments?

I love noir, I love retro science fiction. Nothing gelled here.

  • 11-22-63

  • A Novel
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Craig Wasson
  • Length: 30 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46,474
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,187
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,108

On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back? In this brilliantly conceived tour de force, Stephen King - who has absorbed the social, political, and popular culture of his generation more imaginatively and thoroughly than any other writer - takes listeners on an incredible journey into the past and the possibility of altering it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Owe Stephen King An Apology

  • By Kelly on 04-16-12

Good beginning and end, bloated middle

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-15-15

What did you like best about 11-22-63? What did you like least?

The opening and closing were very strong. Until the middle section I was agreeing that this was one of King's best. I enjoyed the first person, unusual for King, in those parts. It became unbearable in places in the middle. I now know time is obdurate. How do I know? I've been told 5,000 times. Edit out most of that phrase and the book might be two hours shorter. There are other constantly used phrases that could be reduced. We don't need to be told every single time when something happens that exemplifies those phrases. Honestly, we get it. . And now I feel nauseated when I hear "pound cake."

Would you recommend 11-22-63 to your friends? Why or why not?

Not really. Again, I was so frustrated by the middle section.

What three words best describe Craig Wasson’s voice?

A good reader in the main character's voice. He descends into caricature when doing accents. Black people in Dallas seem inspired by Eddie "Rochester" Anderson's broad characterization. Kennedy sounds more like Diamond Joe Quimby from the Simpsons. And the German accent is just all over the place geographically wandering throughout the Teutonic countries with little care.

Could you see 11-22-63 being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

Well, it's being done, so...

Any additional comments?

The middle section bogs things down so much I listened on 1.5X to get through. The main character became insufferable, correcting people's English in ordinary conversation and gassing on about meaningless details. King acknowledges Jack Finney at the end, but seems to have ignored the economy Finney used in giving you the feel for life in another time through modern eyes. And I simply stood there mouth agape when a black woman actually said "Lawsie". Seriously?

  • Swan Song

  • By: Robert McCammon
  • Narrated by: Tom Stechschulte
  • Length: 34 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,765
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,063
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,102

Facing down an unprecedented malevolent enemy, the government responds with a nuclear attack. America as it was is gone forever, and now every citizen - from the President of the United States to the homeless on the streets of New York City - will fight for survival. In a wasteland born of rage and fear, populated by monstrous creatures and marauding armies, earth's last survivors have been drawn into the final battle between good and evil, that will decide the fate of humanity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply an Amazing Story

  • By Amanda H. on 06-21-12

Engaging but with some deep issues

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-21-14

What did you love best about Swan Song?

The narration was great, and the story was well structured, moving us from point of view to point of view. I enjoyed listening to this very long book and finished it fairly quickly.

If you’ve listened to books by Robert McCammon before, how does this one compare?

Never read any others

Which character – as performed by Tom Stechschulte – was your favorite?

He did several great characterizations, I'm not sure I had a favorite. I had an extremely least favorite, a southern black man never given a name who gives Swan a pep talk in a patois and accent that would make Jar Jar Binks uncomfortable. So while the reader handled a lot of characters very well and clearly as individuals, the combination of the author's inability to handle non-white characters well and the actual offensiveness of the portrayal of that character knocked stars from this book.

Who was the most memorable character of Swan Song and why?

Sister, a character who goes from the lowest depths and finds the strength to be the strength for other characters.

Any additional comments?

I had mentioned the author's treatment of non-whites. No character is called "the young white man" but if a character was black, boy did you know it. "The tall black man" got used so much that I started to swear every time I heard it. Much as with some of Stephen King, this is an author who doesn't know how to handle non-white characters and McCammon really steps over the line with one Steppin Fetchit character who doesn't even merit a name. The idea of this toadying "sho nuff" character giving a fawning talk to a pretty blonde girl was absolutely off-the-rails awful. Also, at one point a black wrestler character actually thinks "I pity the fool," giving us a nice "he's just like Mr. T!" moment we didn't need.

  • Warm Bodies

  • A Novel
  • By: Isaac Marion
  • Narrated by: Kevin Kenerly
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,785
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,675
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,671

R is a young man with an existential crisis—he is a zombie. He has no memories, no identity, and no pulse, but he has dreams. His ability to connect with the outside world is limited to a few grunted syllables, but his inner life is deep, full of wonder and longing. After experiencing a teenage boy’s memories while consuming his brain, R makes an unexpected choice that begins a tense, awkward, and strangely sweet relationship with the victim’s human girlfriend, Julie.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible!

  • By Tabitha on 07-21-12

Diverting but somewhat frustrating

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-14

Would you try another book from Isaac Marion and/or Kevin Kenerly?

The writing was beautiful, though sometimes a touch on being overly "writerly." I would give another Marion work a try, especially as I think his style will grow as he does. Kevin Kenerly was a good match for this book, I'd listen to him again happily.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

The ending weakened what came before for me. No spoilers, so I can't say more than I felt that the ending felt forced and just a bit nonsensical.

Which character – as performed by Kevin Kenerly – was your favorite?

Hard not to choose R, the narrator. Kenerly brings a lot to this character.

Did Warm Bodies inspire you to do anything?

This is a question that mystifies me. So I guess the answer must be no.

Any additional comments?

A good book, not a great one. It kept me interested throughout, though it lost me in the last hour.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack

  • Burton & Swinburne, Book 1
  • By: Mark Hodder
  • Narrated by: Gerard Doyle
  • Length: 14 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,718
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,539
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,548

Sir Richard Francis Burton and Algernon Charles Swinburne are sucked into the perilous depths of a moral and ethical vacuum when Lord Palmerston commissions Burton to investigate assaults on young women committed by a weird apparition known as Spring Heeled Jack - and to find out why werewolves are terrorizing London's East End.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fun Steampunk but on the outlandish side

  • By Robert L. on 02-08-12

Clunking written pastiche

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-13-13

What would have made The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack better?

If Burton hadn't been such a bad imitation of Sherlock Holmes, with his detecting and disguises and his band of ragged children and his bloodhound. If the hero hadn't been the least interesting character in the book. If the author hadn't fallen into the trap of needing to bring in so many historical characters to shore up a lackluster alternate history.

What was most disappointing about Mark Hodder’s story?

Hodder obviously sat down and drew up a list of ways to refer to the hero. The King's agent, the famous explorer, the famous Victorian (which undermines part of his own story logic), Sir Richard Francis Burton (if he'd shortened that to Burton every time he used it, the book would have been an hour shorter).

Have you listened to any of Gerard Doyle’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

A good reading of poor material.

What character would you cut from The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack?

Burton. A bad sign when you main character is one you cannot bear to be in the company of.

Any additional comments?

The story is driven by plot devices, things happen because the story needs them to happen and not realistic cause and effect. I made it through, but only because there was a section completely without Burton that kept me interested. Also, the science became ludicrous. It doesn't have to be totally realistic, but at least it has to be believable in the world being created. Some of the characters suffer a side effect of science that makes zero sense, and every time it happened I wanted to scream.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful