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Hepa

United States
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Sex, Death & Honey audiobook cover art

Hep

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-18

Fun, quick, witty. This is a no-nonsense crime caper featuring a badass bounty hunter and a hilarious bird. Five stars

The Drake of Ehknac audiobook cover art

Great High Fantasy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-17

This is a classic revenge story. Dwarf Carmen DeLarosa's entire family is killed by a drake that attacked their caravan. A year later, after she comes of age, Carmen sets out to hunt down the beast.

So, I've personally never been a huge fan of these small, bite-sized stories, especially in fantasy, but this one is really well done and entertaining. The writing is tight, and most importantly, the writing is *good.* I do wish this story was a little more fleshed out, but again that comes to my size bias. The action is quick and flows well. Her motivations are clear and make sense.

This is just the first of a series, and it appears the next book is 3x the length of this one, which is good. It doesn't appear this second book is out on audio.

Price is a good, deliberate narrator whose voice just drips with gravitas. I'm not certain he's the best choice for this story, given it's exclusively from the point of view of a female dwarf, but he does a great job anyway. He's one of those guys who could narrate the instructions on a pack of ramen and make it sound epic.

My verdict: if you like your fantasy tight and quick, this is a great read or listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Interstellar Dad audiobook cover art

Great Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-04-14

Any additional comments?

Basic plot: After breaking down on the side of the road, a recently-divorced man and the tow truck driver who came to help him witness the crash landing of an alien vessel. After some shenanigans, both men end up impregnated by a race of Amazonian green-hued aliens.

Awesome, right? I thought so.

The story is *really* about the uncertainty and fear and wonder that comes with fatherhood. The author attempts to explore the question why some fathers don't care for their children while others are hopelessly enamored with the idea of fatherhood. And why we are so drawn to the idea of having children, AND how some of us deal with the inability to have kids. We also have the ex-wife: a character who is hard to like, but is also hard to hate, which is something I really appreciate. It's left up to the reader to decide what to think of her, and by the end, there's no real resolution to that question. Again, that's something I'm okay with.

There were a couple non-resolutions I'm not so okay with, but it's clear this was meant to be part of a series, so it's acceptable as a reader, as long as these are cleared up by the end of the series. (What's up with the crazy lady who wanted the quote on the windows? Tucker's ambiguity at the end. The relationship with the navigator, etc.)

I'm giving this five stars for the sheer ambitiousness of the story and the easy execution. This is not a typical sci-fi/fantasy novel. There are no great space battles. There's very, very little violence. There are no harrowing action sequences ....and that's okay. It's a story about wonder, and it's a story about new beginnings, with an easy humor sprinkled throughout. In many ways, it's very quiet and subtle. For that, I think many people won't enjoy--or 'get'-- this, but those who like the idea of a story about fatherhood, they will be quite pleased, I think.

The prose itself almost makes the story read like it is for young adults, though the subject matter obviously is for an older audience. The storytelling style is quick and matter-of-fact. The author has a few quirks... an over reliance on cliched phrases, the tendency to over-remind readers of previous details, which is a sign of an author who isn't so trusting of his own work. And the story itself has a few technical issues (for example, the main character is lamenting in one scene how he doesn't have the ability to contact another character, and is suddenly calling him on the phone a few scenes later), all of which another edit would have caught, and in the end they are very minor details, and are mostly things only a person reading with a critical eye would really be bothered by. Also, I did find myself wondering multiple times why the main character didn't just ask the aliens some more question about the baby within him, which would've cleared up a lot of his stress and wonder. Again, minor details.

Overall a good, solid book. I will read part 2 when it is released.

Regarding the audio production itself... Very well done. I have listened to probably 100+ audio book in the past couple years, and this ranks up there in quality, especially considering this is a self-published book. Robert Neil DeVoe does an excellent job narrating this. Kudos.