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  • My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She's Sorry

  • A Novel
  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: Joan Walker
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,311
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,447
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,426

Elsa is seven years old and different. Her grandmother is 77 years old and crazy, standing-on-the-balcony-firing-paintball-guns-at-men-who-want-to-talk-about-Jesus crazy. She is also Elsa's best and only friend. At night Elsa takes refuge in her grandmother's stories, in the Land of Almost-Awake and the Kingdom of Miamas, where everybody is different and nobody needs to be normal.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • For those who are "different" only! Quirky & sweet

  • By Catherine on 05-18-16

A truly wonderful book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-06-18

Loved the story and the narrator who brought it to life. It was a magical combination. It's about an "almost eight" year old little girl and the grandmother she loved so much. She was able to understand real life through the fairytales her grandmother told her. When it was over, it was kind of jarring to have to come back to my real world.

  • We're Going to Need More Wine

  • Stories That Are Funny, Complicated, and True
  • By: Gabrielle Union
  • Narrated by: Gabrielle Union
  • Length: 7 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 11,138
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 10,002
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,969

In this moving collection of thought-provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union tells astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism, and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty, and the divorce of her parents.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 👏🏾👏🏾 thank you. Thank You. THANK YOU!! #BRAVO

  • By Kenneisha Thompson on 11-22-17

Autobiography of Gabrielle Union

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-18

I did not really know who Gabrielle Union was, but the reviews and the sample sounded good, so I purchased this Audible book. I loved it and now I love Gabrielle. Her story about growing up in California, mostly, and spending summers with family in Omaha was especially interesting to me, because I live in Omaha, and I remember most of the places and events that she described. She talks about her education, jobs she has had, and meeting the love of her life and getting married. I was especially interested when she spoke about being a stepparent to their black children and what to teach them about dealing with the police, and staying safe. She is funny, and speaks quite directly about being black in a white world. She speaks truth without anger or prejudice. Very educational and enjoyable. I NEVER read/listen to books twice, but this maybe the exception.
#Domestic #Funny #Heartfelt #Inspiring #Celebrity #Tagsgiving #Sweepstakes

  • Educated

  • A Memoir
  • By: Tara Westover
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 23,914
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 21,712
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 21,601

Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches. In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father's junkyard. Her father forbade hospitals, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. Then, lacking any formal education, Tara began to educate herself. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Other Side of Idaho's Mountains

  • By Darwin8u on 03-28-18

A very touching book.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-18

This audio book was great. The narrator, Julia Whelan, was perfect for this story. This is an autobiography of Tara Westover. Her early life was as a member of a family, the father of which seems to be a radical Christian, a Mormon, who believed the Bible in his own way. There was only natural herbal healing, no doctors. He and her mother home-school the kids, but don’t do a very good job of it. Tara goes to college where it was tough going in the beginning. She didn’t understand what to do in a real school. She wasn’t familiar with academic terminology, or how to write a term paper. But she works hard and becomes quite successful, and in the end, receives her PhD. The way family members relate to each other, and work out their problems, is the basis of the story. Tara was torn between pursuing her education or staying with the family. Her father would not allow her to do both. She has strong emotions about her life and her choices. A really moving story.

  • Assume the Worst

  • By: Carl Hiaasen
  • Narrated by: Carl Hiaasen
  • Length: 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 64
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 60

This is Oh, the Places You'll Never Go - the ultimate hilarious, cynical, but absolutely realistic view of a college graduate's future. And what he or she can or can't do about it. "This commencement address will never be given, because graduation speakers are supposed to offer encouragement and inspiration. That's not what you need. You need a warning." So begins Carl Hiaasen's attempt to prepare young men and women for their future. And who better to warn them about their precarious paths forward than Carl Hiaasen?

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Profanity laced banality

  • By Ed on 04-12-18

Practical advice I wish I had heard sooner

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-13-18

This is the perfect graduation speech. It’s loaded with good advice about your expectations for your future. See the world as it is, not with expectations of a grand future with little effort on your part. I’m an optimist and had high expectations for my future. I have had a good life, but it sure did take more stress and strain than I thought it would. A short listen packed with wisdom.

The Long and Faraway Gone audiobook cover art
  • The Long and Faraway Gone

  • By: Lou Berney
  • Narrated by: Brian Hutchison, Amy McFadden
  • Length: 12 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,230
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,132
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,128

Lou Berney's The Long and Faraway Gone is a smart, fiercely compassionate crime story that explores the mysteries of memory and the impact of violence on survivors - and the lengths they will go to find the painful truth of the events that scarred their lives. In the summer of 1986, two tragedies rocked Oklahoma City. Six movie theater employees were killed in an armed robbery while one inexplicably survived. Then a teenage girl vanished from the annual state fair. Neither crime was ever solved.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It's all together here

  • By Ted on 08-25-16

Keeps you thoroughly engaged.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-18

Every word in this book is necessary. There are no dull and needless passages. One of the best books I've listened to this year. Both narrators were excellent. It is two mysteries spliced into one. Very enjoyable.

  • Don't Look Back

  • By: Gregg Hurwitz
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell, Scott Brick
  • Length: 13 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,222
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,050
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,040

Eve Hardaway, newly single mother of one, is on a trip she’s long dreamed of - a rafting and hiking tour through the jungles and mountains of Oaxaca, in southern Mexico. Eve wanders off the trail, to a house in the distance with a menacing man in the yard beyond it, throwing machetes at a human-shaped target. Disturbed by the sight, Eve moves quickly and quietly back to her group, taking care to avoid being seen. As she creeps along, she finds a broken digital camera, marked with the name Teresa Hamilton.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Strong characters in a weak story

  • By WWaltonG on 05-04-16

Not Hurwitz's best.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-12-18

The narrator was not very good. I put the speed at 1.25, and it was better. Ms. Campbell sounded like she was reading to a pre-school class. I have really enjoyed other books by this author, but this one was a dud. Scott Brick, of course gave a fabulous performance, but that wasn't enough to save this book. Was glad when it was over. At least it did have a good ending. I'll still read a couple more books from Gregg Hurwitz waiting in my library because I have faith they will be up to his usual great writing standard. I don't like giving negative reviews. Sorry Mr. Hurwitz and Ms.Campbell.

  • The Potato Factory

  • The Australian Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Bryce Courtenay
  • Narrated by: Humphrey Bower
  • Length: 23 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,263
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,133
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,131

Always leave a little salt on the bread. Ikey Solomon's favorite saying is also his way of doing business, and in the business of thieving he's very successful indeed. Ikey's partner in crime is his mistress, the forthright Mary Abacus, until misfortune befalls them. They are parted and each must make the harsh journey from thriving nineteenth century London to the convict settlement of Van Diemen's Land.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best audiobook of the year!

  • By karen on 11-30-05

Sweeping story of a man's life.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-18

This book is all engulfing and doesn't let go. I rarely read or listen to such a long book these days, but this one was worth the time investment. I feel that I have lived in England and Australia in the 1800's, along with the people of this book. I can see why it is so highly acclaimed.

  • The Barefoot Summer

  • By: Carolyn Brown
  • Narrated by: Donna Postel
  • Length: 9 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,232
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,055
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,048

Leaving one widow behind is unfortunate. Leaving three widows behind is just plain despicable. Oil heiress Kate Steele knew her not-so-dearly departed husband was a con man, but she's shocked that Conrad racked up two more wives without divorcing her first. The only remnant of their miserable marriage she plans to keep is their lakeside cabin in Bootleg, Texas. Unfortunately, she's not the only woman with that idea.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • It was a great book until...

  • By Too Happy on 08-16-17

Very enjoyable read/listen.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-07-18

I nearly didn't purchase this audible book because I thought the subject of the three wives seemed to be less than exciting. However, the story didn't have one boring moment. It ended up being a warm, happy story that I'm so pleased I didn't miss. Great story and great performance.

  • Deviate

  • The Science of Seeing Differently
  • By: Beau Lotto
  • Narrated by: Beau Lotto
  • Length: 8 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 574
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 515
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 516

Perception is the foundation of human experience, but few of us understand why we see what we do, much less how. By revealing the startling truths about the brain and its perceptions, Beau Lotto shows that the next big innovation is not a new technology: It is a new way of seeing. In his first major book, Lotto draws on over two decades of pioneering research to explain that our brain didn't evolve to see the world accurately. It can't!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Phenomenal

  • By Randy on 12-05-17

This book will not set the world on fire.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-04-18

There are some interesting thoughts here, but I’m not anywhere near “transformed” as some claim to be, according to the author. Anyone studying the deepest workings of the mind may find this book informative. Some people under 50 may find new views here. Maybe I have lived too long, and have had time to figure most of this stuff out for myself, but I didn’t really feel much in the way of enlightenment.

22 of 27 people found this review helpful

  • All the Pretty Horses

  • The Border Trilogy, Book One
  • By: Cormac McCarthy
  • Narrated by: Frank Muller
  • Length: 10 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,919
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,770
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,757

Sixteen-year-old John Grady Cole's grandfather has just died, his parents have permanently separated, and the family ranch, upon which he had placed so many boyish hopes, has been sold. Rootless and increasingly restive, Cole leaves Texas, accompanied by his friend Lacey Rawlins, and begins a journey across the vaquero frontier into the badlands of northern Mexico.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Did not finish

  • By Lora on 02-08-18

Long, slow, mesmerizing.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-17

I really don't quite know what to say about this book. There were things I didn't like, such as the slow progress, but maybe that is why I couldn't stop listening. Along the journey I learned a lot about Mexico in the '40s. I learned about unspeakable poverty. I learned about accepting things we can't change. The poetic language kept me enthralled. But I'm not sure I would read/listen to another book by this author. A little too depressing.

0 of 6 people found this review helpful