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  • You

  • By: Caroline Kepnes
  • Narrated by: Santino Fontana
  • Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,162
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,207
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,189

Beck is everything Joe has ever wanted: she's gorgeous, tough, razor-smart, and sexy beyond his wildest dreams. Joe needs to have her, and he'll stop at nothing to do so. As he begins to insinuate himself into her life - her friendships, her email, her phone - she can’t resist her feelings for a guy who seems custom-made for her. So when her boyfriend, Benji, mysteriously disappears, Beck and Joe fall into a tumultuous affair. But there's more to Beck than her oh-so-perfect façade.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow. This. Book.

  • By Em on 07-17-15

Never thought I'd root for the bad guy...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-21-19

The Skinny
Joe Goldberg is a psychotic stalker who becomes obsessed with the not-so-perfect Guinevere Beck, who makes the mistake of strolling in to the bookstore where Joe works to buy a book. Joe easily tracks her down online and starts stalking her, learning all he can about her, breaking in to her home to steal panties and other Beck memorabilia. Then he seamlessly plants himself into her life, working his way into her heart.

Thoughts
This book is very different from anything I've read or listened to before. Not just the story but how it's told. You're in Joe's head 100% of the time, talking in second person to Beck, and my, what a fascinating place to be that is, especially if you listen to the audiobook. Kepner did a phenomenal job with Joe's character and the narrator perfectly brings him to life. Of course, I watched the Netflix series first, since I had no idea there was a book!!! But I enjoyed it just as much as the show; they're both binge worthy. Joe is charming. But he's also mental, and he does bad things to people. In real life, I would be terrified of a guy like Joe. But fictional Joe is a different story. I wanted Joe to get the happy ending he didn't deserve. He's bad, yes, but he's witty, and funny, and smart, and literary-savvy, and poetic, and candid, and oftentimes relatable. It's hard not to root for this guy, more so because his victims are easily disliked and messed up themselves.

This is clearly fiction, as Joe would not get away with every crime in real life because #forensics #technology, but I really didn't care. I was as obsessed with this book as Joe was with Beck. Okay, maybe not that much, but you get my drift. This book was also very sexual, which might putt off the more prudish listeners out there, but I was able to overlook it, and it did not detract from my enjoyment of the story.

Bottom line: Listen to it. It's good.

  • To Kill a Kingdom

  • By: Alexandra Christo
  • Narrated by: Jacob York, Stephanie Willis
  • Length: 12 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,059
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 987
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 985

Princess Lira is siren royalty and the most lethal of them all. With the hearts of 17 princes in her collection, she is revered across the sea. Until a twist of fate forces her to kill one of her own. To punish her daughter, the Sea Queen transforms Lira into the one thing they loathe most - a human. Robbed of her song, Lira has until the winter solstice to deliver Prince Elian's heart to the Sea Queen and or remain a human forever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fun fantasy ride

  • By R. Havens on 04-17-18

Promises more than it delivers.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-19

The skinny:
You have Lira, a beautiful siren princess who rips royal hearts from their chests with her bare hands, and Elian, a witty pirate prince who makes a successful career out of hunting Lira's kind. How awesome is that??? The story takes off when Lira makes a mistake that pisses off her one-dimensional, evil queen mother, who turns her into a human as punishment. Lira now has to bring back Elian's heart to win her mother's favor and become a siren again. Dun-dun-dun.

Thoughts:
This book starts off with a bang. It's dark and different, and it paves the way for what I thought would be a fantastic story. I was riveted through the first quarter of the book, but my enthrallment slowly faded away as the story sailed on (pun intended). I was expecting a lot more from Lira's complex darkness, a nail-biting romance, and some fun pirate swashbuckling to top it all off. But both Lira's transition to humanity and her slow budding romance with Elian were underwhelming. And, you guessed it, no swashbuckling shenanigans.

My rapt interest briefly returned toward the end of the story, when Elian finds out who Lira really is, but those scenes were followed by the final battle and ending, which can be best described as lackluster. Let's just say it was an undeserving finale and wrap up for this book's potential.

Bottom line: It wasn't what I was hoping it would be, but I still enjoyed the story, even with all its disappointments.

  • The Cruel Prince

  • By: Holly Black
  • Narrated by: Caitlin Kelly
  • Length: 12 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,330
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,071
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,060

Jude was seven years old when her parents were murdered and she and her two sisters were stolen away to live in the treacherous High Court of Faerie. Ten years later, Jude wants nothing more than to belong there, despite her mortality. But many of the fey despise humans. Especially Prince Cardan, the youngest and wickedest son of the High King. To win a place at the Court, she must defy him - and face the consequences.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Mixed feelings . . .

  • By S. E. on 03-09-18

Definitely over-hyped.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-28-18

The skinny:
At seven years old, Jude's parents are murdered, and she and her sisters are whisked away to Faerie (a separate world from ours, where immortal faeries live in a feudal-ish system). Fast forward ten years, and Jude is a bullied human who's trying to fit in this magical word she's grown up in. The end. Jk...sorta.

Thoughts:
The problem with this book is its plot and its pacing. It started off great, but then it took a nosedive into Snooze Land. You see Jude as a tough girl who wants to be somebody, a girl who's trying to make a name for herself, and you follow along as she puts up with/stands up to the faeries, who love to pick on humans for their mortality and susceptibility to magic manipulation. And that's about the gist of it. While minor plot twists kept things from stagnating, I scratched my head as I listened, wondering where the story was supposed to be going, but I didn't get any solid answers until around the third act, when things finally got interesting.

Jude is an intriguing MC. She doesn't fit in to any of the tropes as she's sort of a gray character, neither good nor evil. I liked that about her, even though I didn't necessarily relate to her. To be honest, I did not relate to any of the characters, but strangely, this did not take away from my quasi-enjoyment of the story. I also liked how her relationship with Cardan evolved toward the end, and yet still left lots of room for more in the next installment, which I have a feeling will be much, much better than its predecessor.

Bottom line:
It was an ok listen. But with the promise of a much stronger sequel, I think it's worth giving the series a try.

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • A Short History of the Girl Next Door

  • By: Jared Reck
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 7 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 287
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 266
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 265

Matt Wainwright is constantly sabotaged by the overdramatic movie director in his head. He can't tell his best friend, Tabby, how he really feels about her; he implodes on the JV basketball team; and the only place he feels normal is in Mr. Ellis' English class, discussing the greatest fart scenes in literature and writing poems about pissed-off candy-cane lumberjacks. After a tragic accident, Matt finds himself left on the sidelines, on the verge of spiraling out of control and losing everything that matters to him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I'm sitting here bawling my eyes out with my Macaw

  • By Gary on 10-01-17

Broke my little bookworm heart...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-18

"I don't know what the point of all this is...there are times where there can't possibly be a point. Others, it's like the stars have lined themselves up just for you...I decided, however long I get, if I can spend time with the people I love, I don't really care what the point is."

The skinny:
Matty and Tabby are best friends. They're not only neighbors, but they grew up together from infancy--they're practically family. Except Matty is in love with Tabby. He's content with just being her best friend and spending time together, hoping maybe one day there will be more between them...until varsity basketball stud Liam Branson comes into the picture and whisks her away. Understandably, Matty doesn't take this very well, and his behavior nearly costs him Tabby's friendship, but unbeknownst to Matty, the cards in his future hold something much, much worse.

Thoughts:
It started off slow, with several basketball scenes I would have gladly skipped through, but even when I did stop listening, I always came back for more later. And my persistence paid off. The story got better, and then, just as I was rooting for Matty's happy ending, it slammed me with a heart-wrenching twist I never saw coming. I must say, I think this is the first time a book has made me laugh and cry at the same time. Kudos to the author (you're still fired for breaking my heart, btw).

In spite of the plethora of f-bombs scattered throughout the story, I really did enjoy this book. The characters and their friendships and relationships felt all so real and relatable, which I think is why I am left with such sadness after finishing it.

Bottom line:
It's not perfect, nor one to go down as one of my all-time favorites, but it's a book I'll be thinking about for quite some time. So if crying and laughing in your car sounds appealing, (and if you can deal with Matty's cursing internal monologue) then give it a listen!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Caraval

  • By: Stephanie Garber
  • Narrated by: Rebecca Soler
  • Length: 10 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,238
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,091
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,096

Scarlett has never left the tiny island where she and her beloved sister, Tella, live with their powerful - and cruel - father. Now Scarlett's father has arranged a marriage for her, and Scarlett thinks her dreams of seeing Caraval, the faraway once-a-year performance where the audience participates in the show, are over. But this year Scarlett's long-dreamt-of invitation finally arrives. With the help of a mysterious sailor, Tella whisks Scarlett away to the show. Only as soon as they arrive, Tella is kidnapped by Caraval's mastermind organizer, Legend.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Dreadful Drivel

  • By Claire P. on 03-03-17

If I were a Caraval player, I'd ask for a refund.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-17

Caraval is a magical game hosted on an island every year by the mysterious Legend. Scarlet has been writing to Legend for years, asking him to host Caraval in her home island so she and her sister can attend. Legend finally responds to her last letter before she gets married and sends tickets for Scarlett, her sister Tella, and Scarlett's fiance (whom she's never met). But the game is being hosted on another island, and Scarlett doesn't know how to get herself and her sister there without getting caught by their abusive, psychopath father. Tella, however, has been planning to escape, and when Scarlett tells her about the tickets to Caraval, Tella devices a plan to get them there with the help of a young sailor (Julian). But when Scarlett arrives with Julian at the new island, Tella is nowhere to be found, and Scarlett soon learns that finding her sister is all part of the game.

This book had the perfect ingredients for buttery, periwinkle greatness that fills the tongue with velvety joy, but the ingredients were poorly mixed and baked into a burnt, deflated pancake of moldy gloom and sour sprinkles the color of dejection green...

Ok it wasn't THAT bad, but you get the gist. That description, btw, should give you an idea of how the author likes to describe everything. Though I make fun of it, I have to admit it did add to the whimsical, magical theme of the story...except it's way overused, and half the time those descriptions made no sense:

"Aiko beckoned Scarlett onto a street lined with hanging lanterns, smelling of flowers and flutes and long-lost love"

Although I did like Scarlett, it annoyed me that she was constantly harping about being in Caraval to find/save her sister, and she reminded me of this every five minutes (in case I forgot because her actions said otherwise).

Another problem with the book is the dad. We are told he used to be a loving father until Scarlett's mother left them, and this somehow turned him into a villain who tortures his daughters and kills people who disobey. Yeah, right. I could see the dad being angry, depressed, detached, cold, indifferent, you name it. But an abusive father? I don't buy it. You don't become an abuser because your wife leaves you unless you were an abuser to begin with.

This book's biggest downfall, however, is its plot. Caraval is supposed to be this highly coveted, magical and whimsical game, but it was more along the lines of a bland scavenger hunt where all clues and answers conveniently fall into Scarlett's lap, and all the other players are irrelevant background fillers, thus robbing the story of any sense of competition, urgency or tension. All Caraval brings to the table is confusion and lies.

Bottom line: it's interesting and confusing enough to keep you invested in the story--and the characters are likable--but when all is revealed at the end, you might feel a little miffed.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Heartless

  • By: Marissa Meyer
  • Narrated by: Rebecca Soler
  • Length: 14 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,046
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,893
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,893

Catherine may be one of the most desired girls in Wonderland and a favorite of the unmarried King of Hearts, but her interests lie elsewhere. A talented baker, all she wants is to open a shop with her best friend. But according to her mother, such a goal is unthinkable for the young woman who could be the next queen. Then Cath meets Jest, the handsome and mysterious court joker. For the first time, she feels the pull of true attraction. At the risk of offending the king and infuriating her parents, she and Jest enter into an intense secret courtship.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect narration, but disappointed with the story

  • By Linda Nichols on 12-17-16

Expected more

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-17

Catherine Pinkerton is a girl of noble birth who loves to bake and dreams of owning her own bakery. But alas, the birdbrained king of hearts is infatuated with Cat and wants to make her his queen. Cat has no interest in being queen, of course, but Cat's parents, want the best for their family, so they want her to be the queen. And queens can't be bakers.

This book, in a nutshell, is about Catherine's attempts at following her dreams despite the many obstacles in her way, all the while falling in love with the king's jester. Oh and there's a monster in the mix, but he's just a subplot to a very slow story.

I thought the world building and the characters were developed well, and I liked them all. The problem with this book is its dragging plot. It has you following Catherine as she does her best to figure out how to avoid marrying the king and opening a bakery. On the side, we have the slow-budding romance with Jest, and the mysterious and infrequent attacks of the Jabberwock. I listened to this with a friend while on the road, and I cannot tell you how many times I fell asleep, waking up to realize I didn't miss much (my friend did stay alert and listen, but then again, she was driving). And when I did listen, I kept wondering why we were past the midpoint and the story was still dragging. The story doesn't pick up until about the 70% mark. From here on out, the book was pretty good. Meyer does a great job of transitioning our hero into a villain, and the ending is tragic and cruel, and maybe I shed a tear (or maybe I was cutting an onion in the car), but it was well executed.

Bottom line: Not a bad listen, but having loved and devoured Meyer's Lunar Chronicles, I expected so much more from this.

  • My Lady Jane

  • By: Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, Jodi Meadows
  • Narrated by: Katherine Kellgren
  • Length: 13 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,109
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,043
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,035

At 16, Lady Jane Grey is about to be married off to a stranger and caught up in a conspiracy to rob her cousin, King Edward, of his throne. But those trifling problems aren't for Jane to worry about. Jane gets to be queen of England. Like that could go wrong.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hysterical Alternate History

  • By JGillSt on 06-17-16

OHMYGOSH THIS BOOK!!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-16

My Lady Jane is a witty, comical, and lighthearted Tudor re-imagining set during the reign of young Edward VI. Instead of the clash between Protestants & Catholics, we have Eðians & Verities. Eðians have the power to shape shift into animals, and Verities hate them and want to burn them and be off with their heads and all that jazz.

The book is told in three alternating POV's: Edward, Jane, & Gifford. The story begins when King Edward is told he is dying from "the affliction," and must choose a successor to rule in his place. Given that the next person in line is his sister Mary, a well-known Verity, Edward decides (on John Dudley's suggestion) to name his cousin Jane Gray as the next ruler, forcing Jane to marry Dudley's son Gifford. Neither the strong-minded-book-loving Jane nor the stud-who-spends-his-days-as-a-horse Gifford want to be married to each other, and when these two interact, hilarity ensues. But unbeknownst to them, they are thrust in a plot of conspiracy and betrayal, and will have to work together to survive and set things right for England.

FYI, this is not a typical YA book. Instead of a lot of action and tension, there is banter and silly, clever humor throughout the whole book. And it is unputdownably (yes I just made that up) entertaining. But if you are not in the mood for a happy, snort-in-your-car, bubbly read, then this book is not for you.

Bottom line: It was so much fun. I adored it from start to finish.

  • Riders

  • By: Veronica Rossi
  • Narrated by: Dan Bittner
  • Length: 10 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 112
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 101

For 18-year-old Gideon Blake, nothing but death can keep him from achieving his goal of becoming a US Army Ranger. As it turns out, it does. Recovering from the accident that most definitely killed him, Gideon finds himself with strange new powers and a bizarre cuff he can't remove. His death has brought to life his real destiny. He has become War, one of the legendary four horsemen of the apocalypse.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Needs to be fixed. Chapter 56 & 57 are the same.

  • By Lori on 02-21-16

Entertaining

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-16

This book won't go down as one of my favorites, but with that said, I did enjoy it and there was nothing I did not like about it.

We follow the story of Gideon, a sarcastically hilarious MC with a temper, who--thankfully--has zero feminine tendencies (no description of all the different colors in the girl's eyes and how they glitter under the sun) and actually sounds like a realistic dude. He's training to be an Army Ranger when he suffers an accident and dies. But then he comes back to life, wearing a mysterious metal cuff he can't take off. And he can heal like Wolverine.

Enter Seeker chic (love interest), who drops in to scoop Gideon on a road trip to find the rest of the horsemen, all the while fighting and escaping from the unsavory Kindred (aka the bad guys), who are after some heavenly key that only the Seeker knows about. Add some horsemen training, bonding and fighting, and that's the book in a nutshell.

What I really liked:

Gideon
Jode (Conquest)
The horses
The romance
The sarcasm
The hilarious scenes (I was laughing like an idiot in my car)

But even with all its positives, I still didn't love the book. I was never dying to find out what was next and was ok with not listening to the story for a couple of days at a time. And I'm not dying to get my hands on the next one either. I'm not sure why; I can't figure out what's missing for that wow factor.

Bottom line: it was a good, entertaining listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Last Star

  • The Final Book of The 5th Wave
  • By: Rick Yancey
  • Narrated by: Phoebe Strole, Ben Yannette
  • Length: 9 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,706
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,485
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,481

We're here, then we're gone, and that was true before they came. That's always been true. The Others didn't invent death; they just perfected it. Gave death a face to put back in our face, because they knew that was the only way to crush us. It won't end on any continent or ocean, no mountain or plain, jungle or desert. It will end where it began, where it had been from the beginning: on the battlefield of the last beating human heart.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Really? That's how it ends???

  • By A. Smiling on 08-11-16

Ruined the series for me

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-16

Mannnn this is painful. I had so much love for this series. The 5th Wave is one of my top favorites books of all time, so how did this happen???? The second installment was a lackluster filler of a book, so I was expecting a badass third book to make up for it. That wasn't the case.

The Plot:
I think this is the most glaring issue, at least to me it was. Yancey ruined the Others right from the start of this book, finally revealing the motivations behind their invasion. I can't tell you what it is because "spoilers", but I can tell you that it's an overused trope. If the author was going for original, he totally failed. Yancey stripped the aliens of their badassery in an attempt to make them more multi-dimensional, but it made no sense. Who the hell are these aliens, the guardians of the galaxy?? Who put them in charge?? Their logic makes the waves seem totally unnecessary, imo. Couldn't they do things differently if they are so freaking intelligent?? Do they pull these stupid-ass waves on other planets too?? Where do they come from??? I read from another review that the author changed his mind on the aliens after he wrote the first book, and if that's the case, it shows. It annoyed me to no end. And the final showdown with Vosch? PFFFF. Unsatisfying, to say the least.

Ringer:
I can tell Yancey is 110% #teamringer. Although I liked her more in this book than in the last, she is still my least favorite character. But she is Yancey's special snowflake: badass, and perfect, and just totally taking over the spotlight. It's as if Yancey changed his mind on Cassie being our main lead and shoved her aside.

Cassie:
What the efff happened to Cassie??? Book one Cassie was hilarious and snarky, and I loved her! In book two she is hardly present. In this book we see more of her, only she has suddenly and mysteriously crossed into the annoying MC territory. Her train of thought was downright silly and being in her head was cringe-worthy at times.

Cassie & Evan:
And yet another thing Yancey ruined for me. I was so shipping these two since book one. Book three Cassie & Evan were the farthest thing from romantic. I had zero feels for them this time around. There was no showing their love, only telling and implying. It was weird and hardly present. They belong in an episode of Botched, because that's what Yancey did to these poor love birds. They didn't even get a proper wrap up. Argh.

Ben/Zombie:
One of the few redeeming elements of TLS. The action and suspense from his POV was pretty awesome. I enjoyed his chapters the most.

Sam:
This kiddo became a little far-fetched. A five year old who is way too mature and knows how to build bombs. Yeah right. Even with all his experiences, he still has a not fully developed, five year old's brain. And what's with the Cassie hating? The kid loves Ben more than his own sister, who risked everything for him. And by the end, Cassie is still just an afterthought for this little punk.

The Ending:
Like I mentioned before, unsatisfying. It's meant to be sad and deep and thought provoking, but the author obviously failed because I shed zero tears and all I felt was disappointment. It was more of like an "awww that's terrible" feeling, the one you get when you hear about something tragic happening to a complete stranger.

Having finished the series, I don't think I would recommend them anymore, even with its stellar first book. So with all that said, why three stars? The writing, the action, and Ben. One star for each.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Reign of Shadows

  • By: Sophie Jordan
  • Narrated by: Phoebe Strole, James Fouhey
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 60

Seventeen years ago an eclipse cloaked the kingdom of Relhok in perpetual darkness. In the chaos, an evil chancellor murdered the king and queen and seized their throne. Luna, Relhok's lost princess, has been hiding in a tower ever since. Luna's survival depends on the world believing she is dead.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Could have been better.

  • By Bookworm on 02-21-16

Could have been better.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-16

Reign of Shadows is a dark and mysterious retelling of Rapunzel. In this world, darkness rules for 23 hours a day because of an eclipse, leaving only an hour of daylight. During these 23 hours of darkness, creatures called dwellers emerge from the ground and roam the world, hunting all living beings as food. Meet our MC, Luna (aka Matt Murdock), a 17-year old blind princess who has grown up hiding in a tower under the care and tutelage of Perla and Sivo, the pair who rescued her from being murdered by the Chancellor who killed her parents and took their throne when she was a baby.

At the start of the story, Luna sneaks out of the tower to fetch a birthday present for Sivo, and stumbles into a young archer named Fowler and a pair of siblings, who are being attacked by Dwellers. Luna helps them and offers refuge in her tower. But the safety of the tower doesn't last, as they are attacked, and Fowler and Luna are forced to escape the tower in search of a rumored island free of dwellers. And then the rest of the story revolves around Luna and Fowler fighting for their lives and falling in love as they trek through the dangerous landscape. This is where the book suffers, because there's not much a plot or a resolution. The romance takes over, and though it's a decent romance (a bit insta-lovey but that's understandable given Luna's been locked up in a tower all her life), it left me wanting more from the story.

This dark world swarming with dwellers is, imo, a great and intriguing concept, but sadly it wasn't explored or explained. How did the dwellers come to be? Did they exist before the eclipse? How are trees and plants still around in a world with one hour of daylight?

And then there's Luna's blindness. Though she can't see, she is somehow an expert at throwing weapons, has augmented hearing and smell, she can travel unknown landscapes without tripping, and has an uncanny sense of direction; it's never explained how she can do these things. The author paints this as though Luna's blindness is what makes her strong and unique, suggesting her lack of sight is what improved her hearing and smell. I can see someone being more attentive/focused when you don't have sight to rely on, but that doesn't explain supernatural abilities; perhaps this will be revealed in the next book? Luna is a little too much of a selfless do-gooder, but I was ok with her. I really liked Fowler, he's a good romantic interest, and the author does a good job of differentiating his POV from Luna's. The one thing I did not like about Fowler was the occasional flowery monologue that sounded too feminine for a male character.

Bottom line: the plot and world building are lacking, but the characters and romance were decent enough to keep my interest. I plan on listening to the next one, whenever it comes out.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful