LISTENER

Dr. Schtick

Rutland, VT
  • 2
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 4
  • ratings
  • Crimea

  • By: Orlando Figes
  • Narrated by: Malk Williams
  • Length: 20 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 110
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 110

The terrible conflict that dominated the mid-19th century, the Crimean War, killed at least 800,000 men and pitted Russia against a formidable coalition of Britain, France and the Ottoman Empire. It was a war for territory, provoked by fear that if the Ottoman Empire were to collapse then Russia could control a huge swathe of land from the Balkans to the Persian Gulf. But it was also a war of religion, driven by a fervent, populist and ever more ferocious belief by the Tsar and his ministers that it was Russia's task to rule all Orthodox Christians and control the Holy Land.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very detailed account

  • By Joel Conley on 08-20-18

Exactly as advertised

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-19

I enjoyed listening quite a bit. Though consider myself fairly well informed on European history, other than "The Charge of the Light Brigade" the Crimean War had been a lacunum in my understanding. Figes' account is comprehensive without being exhausting. More useful than just background for an eventual Jeopardy! championship the especially excellent final chapter, in which the author shows the war root cause of many issues still with us today was quite enlightening.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The German War

  • A Nation Under Arms, 1939-1945; Citizens and Soldiers
  • By: Nicholas Stargardt
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 24 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 585
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 526
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 520

As early as 1941, Allied victory in World War II seemed all but assured. How and why, then, did the Germans prolong the barbaric conflict for three and a half more years? In The German War, acclaimed historian Nicholas Stargardt draws on an extraordinary range of primary source materials - personal diaries, court records, and military correspondence - to answer this question. He offers an unprecedented portrait of wartime Germany, bringing the hopes and expectations of the German people to vivid life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding.

  • By Francis S. Brown on 06-09-16

Exhaustive But Not Exhausting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-19

Not for the squeamish, the author goes into exacting detail, bringing scenes of battle, starvation, torture and rape very much to life. As many of my extended family were murdered by the Germans, the gruesome depictions of Soviet soldiers exacting revenge provided welcome schadenfreude.