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Julia R.

  • 14
  • reviews
  • 8
  • helpful votes
  • 236
  • ratings

This Story Has 2 Major Flaws

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-21-19

This story has 2 major logical flaws that I'm not going to share here because they would giveaway the solution & the end almost before you start to listen. This was however my first & last Tim Tignor book.

Unfortunately this Book is Forgetable

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-19

The title "The Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir Who Got Trapped in an Ikea Wardrobe" is quite catchy and seems to promise an interesting and unusual story. The story is indeed unusual it's just not very interesting. I found the story line highly improbable and the characters shallow. While a transformation of the main character occurs it feels like a surface transformation at best and almost convenient and disingenuous at worst. Over the years I've read and listened to many many books and know that it is possible to write a book that is improbable and still believable or at least creates a space where I can suspend my belief this book is not one of those. I listened to this book all in one day while I was working on some deep house cleaning. By the time I put my head to the pillow it surprised me to notice that I had trouble remembering the plot and the characters, nothing had stuck. This is in contrast to books like the Outlander series,The Night Circus, the Isaac Bell series, the Royal Spyness series and the Elemental Assassin series.. All very different books and all books that I've thought about and still think about long after I've read or listened to them. I was excited to listen to The "Extraordinary Journey of the Fakir Who Got Trapped in and Ikea Wardrobe" because of it's catchy title and was disappointed. It will be one of those books that I forget. I expected more. . .

Got Better as it Went Along

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-19

I didn't like Margot or the book @ first & don't think we are supposed to. While things were shifting all along it was of course in NYC, her home, where we meet Margot's friends & can see the transformations coming fast & furious. In the end I enjoyed the book quite a bit. I'd have to say that Vera was my favorite character. She was unapologetically just who she is. It takes a lot of bravery to take that stand in the world.

Felt Like I Was Being Lectured By My Parents

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-18

I have tired twice to listen to this book and have been unable to get past more than a few chapters. In those chapters as well as the summary of what would be covered I heard nothing that I wasn't taught as a child simply by watching my parents actions and choices. This book is really like a long lecture on why you should give and what you might be able to give as well as telling you over and over how much you gain by giving. All of which is accurate but does not give the listener/reader the experience of what is being pointed to. Without more of the feeling of the "Gifts of Giving" the book and it's message lands flat. The only part that I found helpful was expanding the possibilities of what one might have to give. Otherwise it's too bad really as I was hoping for something more grounded and advanced and even research driven than a parental lecture. A book detailing the wonderful experiences of the authors would have been more instructive and entertaining and perhaps uplifting.

Good not Great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-26-17

I'm a sucker for novels/mysteries set in historic England. The characters are well written and our hero, Sebastian is principled if not complicated. However there was one obvious question about the murder that was never asked. If it had been asked the murder would have been easily solved thus drastically shortening the book. That said the details about speech patterns, historical information on the upper and lower classes and the travel through the byways of London as well as the tension of the story was interesting & fascinating. I will likely eventually listen to all 12 books in the series.

Tangentially Connected Facts Not A Story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-17

While thoroughly researched and carefully written The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher by Kate Summerscale is not a story it is rather a collection of a number of facts about Victorian England that tangentially connect to the actual murder of a 3 year old boy by one of his family members in England in 1860. The book begins with a detailed description from actual police reports of the evening before the murder, the discovery of the child's body the next day and the actions of the police and household members following the discovery. After that the author skips around in time to share in-depth about how the idea of a detective came into existence and how that lead to the formation of the first detective squad in London in the 1850's. We learn about how the idea of an all seeing all knowing detective seized the public's imagination and how many contemporary English authors, including Charles Dickens were fascinated by and wrote about detectives. The author goes on to describe how this fascination lead to the creation of the detective novel which still effects detective stories to this day. The author always comes back to the narrative of the crime and the search for clues to who committed the crime. Eventually Detective Jonathan Whicher is dispatched from London to Road House.to solve the riddle. At which point we get his entire history from information about the area in which he grew up to speculation about his perhaps having had a wife and son who may have died. We learn about his career from the day he joined the police force and what his job was like early on. In another tangent we learn about Samuel Kent, the father of the murdered child and his history with his first wife who went mad and died. Even later we hear about the first use of the word clue as in finding a clue to what happened as well as the first use of the word sleuth as it relates to detectives. We learn how many newspapers there were in England at the time of the murder and hear direct quotes from articles and editorial about the murder. After which we are told the total number of newspapers there were just a few years later which turns out to be at least 300 more bringing the total to over 1,000.

What I've written here is but a smattering of a few of the details and factoids shared in this book. It is clear that the author and likely many others see this particular murder as significant. And perhaps in actual fact the conjunction of this particular murder, the new presence of detectives, the preponderance of newspapers and the particular views and attitudes of the time and place lead to this moment in time exerting a great effect on how we see the world today. While I find that conjecture interesting it is not sufficiently interesting to me to have purchased the book if I'd truly understood how it was written and what the author's intention was in writing the book. That said now that I'm more than half way through I will finish listening to the book.

Imaginative & Enjoyable Rewrite of Aladdin

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-17

I really enjoyed this book! Writing the book from the Genie's point of view worked very well as the Jinn in literature and in this book are much maligned. Yet here is a Genie who mourns and is filled with regret who is trapped by the rules and powers that created and bind her not only to her lamp. Those same forces plus the fear and hatred of her kind keep her from doing what she most deeply wants to do. The world, creatures and events that Jessica Khoury has created around this age old tale greatly entertain as the surprises, twists, turns, magic greed and evil all work together to create an exciting, fun, story that draws you forward though out the book. Enjoy!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

The Story Works the Narrator not so much

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-16

This being my 3rd In Death book about which I would say much of what I said about the first one. The difference here was that the Narrator's ability to use the variety of voices necessary for the number of characters in the story was taxed. While by now she is the voice of the In Death books for me I found that she has about 5 voices while this book required 7 or 8. Often when she would begin speaking I would think that it was one character until I'd heard enough to figure out that it was a different character entirely. At which point my mind would have to switch gears and reorient to the actual character who was speaking and their part if the story. It wasn't horrible just disorienting.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

A bit embarrassed the I'm enjoying this series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-16

Because this series is so formulaic and so often predicable I'm a bit embarrassed that I'm enjoying them so much. I in fact just bought 3 more credits so that I can buy some more In Death books. The truth is that I like the characters and the identity of the murderer is sufficiency obscured that I can appreciate the plot twists. Eve Dallas is a hard boiled female cop with a heart whose childhood is ,in this book obscured from her. She works too hard, too many hours, eating too infrequently as she pushes herself to be the voice of justice for the victims. If you like a mix of murder and romance and can feel your way more than think your way through the story I think that you'll enjoy this and many others in the series.

Really Good... after the first 2 chapters that is

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-16

I've been reading Sci-fi and fantasy for close to 50 years and the over the top disgusting, juvenile, impossible to understand details in the first couple of chapters almost kept me from continuing. After that I found that the combination of paranormal/magic and spy genres works and works well! If you are a fan of Sci-fi, Fantasy, Magic, Mystery, or Spy books you might give this series a try. I'm currently visiting Audible to look for the next Laundry Files Novel.