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britishbob

Tx USA
  • 13
  • reviews
  • 116
  • helpful votes
  • 22
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Dead Book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-19

So glad to pop in here to see if it was me or not and find out it's not!

I generally love Peter Clines but even Ray Porter seems to read this book meh.

I've got about 2 1/4 hours left and I'm not sure if I'll finish.

I don't usually read reviews while I'm actually reading the book but as I said I wondered whether it was me struggling or whether anyone else was too.

It doesn't really give me any satisfaction to know I wasn't the only one mugged

47 of 51 people found this review helpful

Not one of Clancy's finest moments

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-15-18

In ye olde days of print I read a lot of Tom Clancy so I decided to catch up on some of the audio work.

I regretted this one shortly into it and remembered what had given me the hump about it when I read the print edition more than a decade ago.

Clancy was an author with a reputation for research but I always found he could be incredibly sloppy, especially when his work involved Britain. I hope that his other research was better but on the examples I've heard I maybe doubt it.

Case in point is Patriot Games. Clancy uses as his backdrop the Northern Irish troubles.and its encroachment into England.

No problem with that, in fact it was a good foil to introduce his recurring hero but that's pretty much it .

Once again Clancy engages in sloppy research to bolster the story but as a result keeps removing the reader from suspension of disbelief.

Having lived in England at the time of these troubles and having been far closer to some of the bombings than I would liked to have been I feel a little qualified to comment.

The Irish Republican Army (I.R.A.) was largely divided into two. (and I will come to a point that you will understand)

Sinn Fein was the political wing of the I.R.A.

The Provisional wing of the I.R.A. were the terrorists (I have no doubt they would refer to themselves as freedom fighters.)

Because of this division, in the British Isles they were either refereed to as either "The I.R.A." or "Sinn Fein" depending on the activity and they were known in Northern Ireland as "The Provo's."

At no point were they ever refereed as the P.I.R.A.!

This may sound a little pedantic however imagine trying to read/listen if you were doing so with even just a little knowledge of the history of the troubles to constantly hear/read P.I.R.A.

I believe there is also a reference to the I.R.A. not dealing in "hard drugs" making them look whiter than white. From my knowledge the I.R.A. dealt in drugs in Northern Ireland to fund their weapons/explosive purchases. I don't claim to be an expert, just passing what was common knowledge.

I am wondering if Clancy was blinkered by Catholicism?

So the book is grossly inaccurate however it's a work of fiction right? Sorry. Not when it constantly suspends the readers disbelief .

As for Scott Brick.....I've heard him read better than this. His accents are poor and leads to some confusion when moving betwixt some of the players. In a fairly complicated plot that is not a good thing.

So all in all not one of Clancy's finest moments and rather spoiled Jack Ryan's introduction

Torture

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-19-18

There is little to say about this book. Even less that’s good. To be fair the concept isn’t bad but the story spend too much time going from point a to point c forgetting that there was a point b somewhere in the middle. As to Liam Owen (the reader.... can’t be called a narrator) if there was one one way to drive off an invading superior hoard of aliens...... have this guy read them a bedtime story.... that will send them home in a hurry. In all honesty it was difficult to grasp how good or bad this book was because of the pitiful reading. The reader sounded happy when portraying the death of a family member. I would live forever not to have this guy read the eulogy at my funeral.

At the end of this book there was an ominous “end of volume one” message. If the publisher and author are serious then I have some advice. Have this book re read by someone with some chops and reissue it to all of the current owners whilst inviting them to the dawn execution (behind the outhouse) of this narrator.

Unless you like torture don’t touch this book with a 10ft bargepole.

Contractual Obligation Book

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

With "Peace Talks" obviously at an impasse Jim Butcher spews out this nonsense to fulfill his contractual obligations and quell the discontent in Dresden fans.

I really never thought I would hear a Dresden book that is as poor as this one is.

Only one new story and not really a good one either. the others are barely ok (if you hadn't already heard them or bought them in other forms.) I don't know about anyone else but I buy these books to hear the adventures of Harry Dresden but we have two stories about Molly, and some stories involving a couple of wardens where Harry never really appears except in a name check..

I have no objection to hearing stories about Molly and others but similarly I might not go out of my way to buy them either and I certainly don't expect to hear them when I thought I was buying a Harry Dresden book. I know the cover states "More stories from The Dresden Files." but I don't go to a car dealer and have him tell me a go-cart is a car because they both have four wheels!

The stories contained are poor and seem to have put out in desperation because the promised "Peace Talks" is now so late it might as well be working for an airline.

Had I known I wouldn't have touched this with a 10ft barge pole.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

Meh

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-17

This was always likely. The Martian was outstanding and this is the follow up with such high expectations. As usual there will be the usual ravers following along like sheep but at the end of the day this was just a “caper story” set on the moon.

I do think, if Mr. Weir were inclined it would make a reasonable start for a series but even that has been done before and better (The Retrieval Artist series by Kristine Kathryn’s Rusch for example.)

So for all the “push” Audible gave this.... save a credit, this is only meh

A surprise

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-17

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. If you buy it expecting a "standalone" with everything neatly tied up with a bow at the end then you will be disappointed as it is obviously a kick off for a series. The ending is a little unexpected but was obviously written with further books in mind.

The story was reasonably original but in the areas it starts to falter the excellent Todd Bryce has enough in him to keep the listener interested.

I bought both books in the series (so far) at once so it mitigated the low key ending knowing that the second half will follow as soon as I press play and (without hearing the second) I would recommend any potential listener do the same. This is a book I could listen to again.

A Monsterously Fishy Tale.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-15-17

I am guessing this author went for a vacation in Scotland and got captured by the myth of Nessie, what we have here is a story so obviously of a foreign land by an American.

Stories (especially audio) rely very heavily on a suspension of disbelief and this one fails spectacularly as the listener is constantly dragged out of that state time and time again with very obvious mistakes.

Firstly, why would anyone have a story based largely in Scotland relying heavily on regional accents choose an American for their narrator unless that narrator was especially gifted? And of course....This one isn't!
Not that he does a bad job, it's just that the material is unsuited.

Now for the author!

I thought that this book must have been written by the comedian "Steve Allen;" so laughably flawed is the execution of the story. Time and time again disbelief is suspended by the most basic of errors which shows that all of the research went into Nessie rather than constructing a story.

I hope the author made money from this book because it's obvious from that research that none was done into life in the British Isles, let alone Scotland.
Obviously I have a small advantage as I was raised in these isles but I say small as I have never been lucky enough to visit Scotland.


So let's dissect some of these flaws and I promise to try not to spoil.....

In the court room scenes the American practice of "Objection and Sustained" are not any part of any U.K. courtroom.

Later the "flawed hero" travels to see a vet on a Harley Davidson which apparently was "magiced" out of his backside!

We are (by this time) two thirds of the way into the book and there has been no previous mention of the hero being able to ride, let alone having access to such a machine.

This aside from the fact that Harley's in the U.K. are as rare as (here it comes....) Nessie droppings. I lived in an area where exotic vehicles were an every day sight but the number of Harley's....... I wouldn't have had to take my socks off to count..... In my life!

At the end of this journey on this American iconic stallion we find that the vet is (what a surprise...) American.

The hero then goes through a song and dance with the vet involving some question of legality where upon he declares that he was bitten by Pit Bull dogs.

Dear Mr. Allen,

Her Majesties Government specifically outlawed Pit Bulls in the year of our lord 1991 under what was introduced as the "Dangerous Dogs Act."

Under this act (after a number of attacks by Pit Bull dogs) the breed was specifically neutered so that it would die out and living Pit Bulls were required to be muzzled while outside.
If any vet questioning the possible legality of what they were about to assist the hero with had been told this story klaxons would have been sounding and the police would have been called.

The area of Loch Ness has so many Americans inhabiting it there would be no room for locals.

Has there ever been a good book where the ever so mysterious (and ever popular stage villains) Knights Templar are involved?

And those are just the flaws that come easily to mind.

I think if anyone is still reading this klaxons will be sounding for them too.

Don't waste a credit, don't waste any money!

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

Apocalyptic roller coaster with no coast!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-13-17

I joined this series a little late after seeing the trilogy offered at a knockdown price if I bought the kindle edition.
To me R.C.Bray can come and read my shopping list and I'll eat the black olives even if I didn't put them on it! But combine him with a good author and a good story and now we're cooking with gas.
The series has built steadily and I are become more and more addicted with every book.
While at times the factors of the story have looked a little convenient (like what would really be the chances of finding patient zero.....really???) the author has had enough side tricks in his bag to keep the listener hooked.
Trying not to give too much away, the author has (like a master magician) managed to produce the last few books in the series so that the listener almost forgets that this is supposed to be zombie apocalypse.
Like a musician building towards the end of a show and looking to earn an encore the last few books have built towards the last number in the set. The one that every one has forgotten.
And it has been done brilliantly. This is an eleven hour battle that barely lets up and it's not with the zombies!!!
Just when you think you know what's going to happen, splat! You're wiping egg from your face. Of course, there is an enevitble conclusion.....the encore. Because if there's not the audience leaves disappointed.
But no one is leaving this show unhappy

A politically correct Bond but a bad Bond book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-15

Let me start out by saying that the majority of this book was fairly typical James Bond and had circumstances been different I would have certainly given it a much better review but for me it had two major problems.

I was aware for over 6 months that this book was scheduled for release and had been looking forward to it.

However.

If you are going to write a James Bond book and you are going to proudly state that you are also going to include some of Ian Fleming's original material, why would you write it in a way that almost definitely went against Ian Fleming's vision? Especially if you are going to deliberately situate Bond in his own time.

Part of the legend of James Bond (ignoring the films) is his lifestyle.

So why then would you attempt to impose a 21st century lifestyle?

If Anthony Horowitz has such strong feelings on smoking then why even take on a project where the main character is a known avowed smoker?

There were several anti smoking references in this book which jarred and immediately caused a "suspension of disbelief." Which to me is the biggest crime an author can commit.

That brings me to the second of the major problems I mentioned at the start of this review.

David Oyelowo.

I listened to this person narrate a book before and I thought then that it was one of the most awful things I had ever heard and I was immediately dismayed to learn that he had been chosen to read this book.

Aware that several years had passed since I last heard him I was prepared to give him a chance and to his credit he has improved.

Unfortunately not enough by quite a long shot!

There were several points where he was trying to perform female roles and quite frankly I was reminded of Donald Duck.

And that brings us back to "the suspension of disbelief."

The story (ignoring the above faults) is quite engaging, provided that one doesn't stop to think about it too much.

Because if you do you''ll notice that the route from "A" to "B" and so on is extremely tenuous. And that is where the crime of "suspension of disbelief" really hits home because it's in those moments I found myself thinking about how the plot was strung together.

To my mind Horowitz had a plot but didn't achieve tying that together with the Fleming material.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

Great story shame about the quality

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-12

This is an old story written originally by Douglas Adams and intended for television but unfortunately never made it to the screen.

I have not finished listening but the story has been polished by Gareth Roberts and seems to be fine, likewise so does the narration.

What is not fine is the audio quality which is appalling. Does no one at Audible bother to do even a sample check of the product that they put out?

Listening on V-Moda earbuds in supposedly "enhanced quality" Lalla Wards narration is muffled and fuzzy. Each new chapter is heralded by a hiccup in the sound.

The whole story so far sounds like it was sent to Audible as a cd rip and then poorly compressed to Mp3.

Audible should be embarrassed putting out such low quality product.

2 of 8 people found this review helpful