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Heather

Broomfield, CO, United States
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  • Basic Witches

  • How to Summon Success, Banish Drama, and Raise Hell with Your Coven
  • By: Jess Zimmerman, Jaya Saxena
  • Narrated by: Amy McFadden
  • Length: 5 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 133
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 114

Want to feel terrifyingly beautiful? Wear the right color of eye shadow to project otherworldly glamour. Need to exorcise a toxic friendship? Repeat the proper incantation and make it disappear. DIY projects, rituals, and spells summon the best trends of the modern witchy lifestyle and the time-trusted traditions of the hell-raising women of the past. With humor, heart, and a hip sensibility, Jaya Saxena and Jess Zimmerman dispense witchy wisdom for the curious, the cynical, and anyone who could use a magical boost.  

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Absolute garbage

  • By Heather on 07-07-18

Absolute garbage

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-18

I’m not sure what I was expecting, but this book should just be called “how to be gothy but not in, like, a scary way.” Literally no substance at all. I have no idea who this book is for. It is full of “spells” (mostly thought experiments, really) but it’s constantly explaining how much the authors don’t believe in witchcraft or the occult. The first chapter is literally a how-to guide for goth fashion. It’s all in the name of empowerment, but it’s seriously defanged by the authors’ seeming to apologize for every line. I don’t even think this book would have taught me anything when I was fifteen. It’s short and I couldn’t even make it halfway through.

34 of 35 people found this review helpful

  • Legends

  • Stories by the Masters of Fantasy, Volume 4
  • By: Anne McCaffrey, Raymond E. Feist, George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Sam Tsoutsouvas, Kathryn Walker, Frank Muller
  • Length: 6 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 248
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 181
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 180

The monumental series of audio original fantasy concludes with this collection of three all-new stories by Anne McCaffrey, Raymond E. Feist, and George R.R. Martin. All of them are set in the uncanny realms of their phenomenally popular novels.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 2 out of 3 isn't bad

  • By Tommy on 04-22-13

The Hedge Knight almost makes up for the others

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-14

So I'm not going to beat around the bush: I love A Song of Ice and Fire, and as such I didn't mind dropping my credit on this book just to get the Dunk and Egg story out of it. And I was not disappointed at all by that story. George R.R. Martin can make me love or hate (or love to hate) a character in a single sentence, and this story is no exception! There really isn't much else to say, aside from being a gushy fangirl.

The other two though. Well. Not so much. McCaffrey's story certainly isn't bad, it's just nothing special. I loved reading the Pern books in middle school and high school, so it was a nice bit of nostalgia, but it just didn't really have anything special to offer. The main character is a typical fantasy heroine: super beautiful and Not Like Other Girls. The plot is very predictable and infuriatingly slow, but underneath it all not a terrible way to pass a couple of hours.

The Feist story though. Wow. I don't remember much of it because I honestly had a very hard time paying attention. I think I remember it being predictable, and having certain undertones that were uncomfortably racist. It was so bad that I am giving this whole book two stars despite that Martin's story is excellent and McCaffrey's merely forgettable. I actually wish I would have just skipped the entire section, I would have been far more satisfied with the book as a whole.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Handmaid's Tale

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Claire Danes
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,241
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,215
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,209

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead, serving in the household of the enigmatic Commander and his bitter wife. She may go out once a day to markets whose signs are now pictures because women are not allowed to read. She must pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, for in a time of declining birthrates her value lies in her fertility, and failure means exile to the dangerously polluted Colonies. Offred can remember a time when she lived with her husband and daughter and had a job, before she lost even her own name....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A heartwrenching story read absolutely brilliantly

  • By Heather on 08-22-12

A heartwrenching story read absolutely brilliantly

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-12

This book is a speculative fiction classic. The rise of the Gilead society seems all too plausible in today's political climate, and Offred's story is painful in its intensity.

I often find myself disappointed by the narrators of audiobooks, but not so with this one. Claire Danes does an incredible job reading, listening to her is like being inside Offred's head, and she manages to inject pathos into the story without ever distracting the listener from the true star: the words.

Readings this good of stories this potent are the reason audiobooks exist. If I could give it ten stars I would.

143 of 155 people found this review helpful

  • Neuromancer

  • By: William Gibson
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,392
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,905
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,919

Twenty years ago, it was as if someone turned on a light. The future blazed into existence with each deliberate word that William Gibson laid down. The winner of Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer didn't just explode onto the science fiction scene - it permeated into the collective consciousness, culture, science, and technology.Today, there is only one science fiction masterpiece to thank for the term "cyberpunk," for easing the way into the information age and Internet society.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Still my favorite novel

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-27-13

The Definitive Cyberpunk

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-12

What is there to say about Neuromancer that hasn't already been said better by someone else? It defined a genre, and so much more. So much of what the internet is has been defined by Gibson's Sprawl books that it's hard to believe none of the terminology therein existed before he wrote it. Any fan of science fiction is morally obligated to read this book.

The reading takes a little getting used to. My husband joked that he sounded like a "computer voice," like the voice that Apple OS "reads" in. Once he gets going, Dean gets a bit easier to listen to, but the voice he uses for Molly is utterly ridiculous. In all fairness, it's probably pretty hard for a man to deliver her lines in any way that does not come off as ridiculous.

Still, I have an abridged audiobook as read by the author, and that is probably the best way to listen to this book. Unfortunately, it's abridged. This reading does make a nice compromise.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Clockwork Universe

  • Isaac Newton, The Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World
  • By: Edward Dolnick
  • Narrated by: Alan Sklar
  • Length: 10 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,242
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,763
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,778

The Clockwork Universe is the story of a band of men who lived in a world of dirt and disease but pictured a universe that ran like a perfect machine. A meld of history and science, this book is a group portrait of some of the greatest minds who ever lived as they wrestled with natures most sweeping mysteries. The answers they uncovered still hold the key to how we understand the world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Concise Explainer

  • By Jean on 09-19-16

Fun Survey of the Period

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-12

This book is certainly a lot of fun for anyone with a passing interest in intellectual history in general, or the turn of the eighteenth century in England in specific. If you're already pretty versed in the beginnings of the Royal Society or the life of Isaac Newton, you probably won't learn very much, but Dolnick's handling of the subject matter is still engaging and makes it feel like you're listening to a story about some old friends. A great aspect of this book is that it pays particular attention to the interpersonal relationships between the great minds of the era. Newton's feuds could fill a book of their own, but this book handles some of the big ones rather neatly.

I would like to point out, however, that the reading is pretty grating. Alan Sklar certainly has a pleasant speaking voice, but his delivery of the material seems almost condescending at times. At several points in the narration, he actually chuckles while delivering some lines, and the result is that he comes across as holding the primary sources in contempt, whether that is actually true or not. Some of the great discoveries of that time have become practically cliché, but in their original context they deserve more respect than this reading gives them.

Still, this book is an enjoyable experience from start to finish. As someone who has researched this particular period fairly extensively, I didn't really learn much from it, but I enjoyed listening. I recommend it to anyone interested in learning more about the Scientific Revolution, or what kind of man Sir Isaac Newton actually was.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful