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VAHagel

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  • Original Meanings

  • Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution
  • By: Jack N. Rakove
  • Narrated by: Steven Weber
  • Length: 17 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 28

What did the US Constitution originally mean, and how can we recover the intentions of its framers? These questions, which resound throughout today’s most heated legal and political controversies, lie at the heart of Jack N. Rakove’s splendidly readable work of historical analysis. In Original Meanings, he traces the complex weave of ideology and interests from which the Constitution emerged and shows how Americans have attached different meanings to their founding document from the moment it was published.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Epistemological in its approach ...

  • By History on 10-24-11

awesome history of exactly what the title advertis

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-17

This was an incredibly good analysis of the thoughts and words of the men who wrote the Constitution, the issues debated at the Constitutional Convention, and the views of each of the critical players on the various parts of the Constitution and Bill of Rights, all based on contemporaneous sources.

  • The Founding Fathers' Guide to the Constitution

  • By: Brion McClanahan
  • Narrated by: David Cochran Heath
  • Length: 6 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60

How did the founding generation intend for us to interpret and apply the Constitution? Are liberals right when they cite its “elastic” clauses to justify big government, or are conservatives right when they cite its explicit limits on federal power? Professor Brion McClanahan, popular author of The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Founding Fathers, finds the answers by going directly to the source—the Founders themselves, who debated all the relevant issues in their state constitutional conventions.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Conservtive bias but powerful & informative

  • By Yishai ben Yakov Leib on 09-09-18

author is wrong on many constitutional law points

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-17

would be great book but author gives annoying erroneous opinions on constitutionality of different things

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Forge of Union, Anvil of Liberty

  • A Correspondent's Report on the First Federal Elections, the First Federal Congress, and the Bill of Rights
  • By: Jeffrey St. John
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 6 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

One of the most important news stories of the last two centuries comes to life in this "eyewitness account" of America's first Federal elections, the First Congress, and President Washington creating the Bill of Rights. In this swift-moving and colorful chronicle, written by St. John as though he were an on-the-scene reporter, listeners will discover how Congressman James Madison became, in the formative months of the new Republic, the power behind Washington in the executive branch...

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Crapola

  • By Gary on 09-01-06

amazing. exactly what we need to be focusing on

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-17

this is exactly what we need to be focusing on right now. This is the stuff that could bring the country together and heal The Great Divide the likes of Rupert Murdoch and Roger Ailes have created for this country

  • Constitutional Journal

  • A Correspondent's Report from the Convention of 1787
  • By: Jeffrey St. John
  • Narrated by: Jeff Riggenbach
  • Length: 7 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13

You are there, in 1787 at America's constitutional convention, with the inside story as veteran print and broadcast journalist Jeffrey St. John "reports" each day's proceedings, flavoring his dispatches with quotes from private correspondence and notes of the delegates.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome!!! A must read/ listen to for any American

  • By VAHagel on 04-24-17

Awesome!!! A must read/ listen to for any American

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-24-17

This book is written in a format whereby the narrator is newspaper reporter who is reading you his article. The article is a report of the day by day happenings during the Constitutional Convention ( which is a fictitious tool to get a very good chronological story told.) He reports on various things said by the delegates and Reed's various the letters that any members of the Convention sent to anyone else and vice versa, as well as well as various other contemporaneous documents and news articles from other places. The result is an easy-to-understand, very descriptive and detailed, chronological picture of the Constitutional Convention and who said what about the clauses of the Constitution on which they were working at any given moment. The REAL original intent.