LISTENER

Nicholas

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 40
  • helpful votes
  • 93
  • ratings
  • A Generation of Sociopaths

  • How the Baby Boomers Betrayed America
  • By: Bruce Cannon Gibney
  • Narrated by: Wayne Pyle
  • Length: 14 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 446
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 406
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 405

What happens when a society is run by people who are antisocial? Welcome to baby boomer America. In A Generation of Sociopaths, Bruce Cannon Gibney shows how America was hijacked by the boomers, a generation whose reckless self-indulgence degraded the foundations of American prosperity.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Single minded but convincing arguments within

  • By Joshua Hagood on 09-25-17

Sociopathic In It's Defense of Hardcore Ideology

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-18-18

What disappointed you about A Generation of Sociopaths?

After reading several reviews and the synopsis, I had the impression this book would broach an interesting topic, the psychology and possible sociopathy of the Baby Boomer generation, with a fair and balanced approach. The summary lauded this scholarly approach to the topic and a few reviews bought into that assessment. I lasted roughly five hours before shutting down this jaded, leftist, big government preaching malarkey! Decidedly leftwing when discussing a myriad of topics associated with Baby Boomer's, A Generation of Sociopaths barely disguises a repugnant zeal for big government programs, big taxation, and the whole, "It takes a village mentality," regarding every facet of life. Preaching human manufactured global warming and environmentalism like settled science; this book seeks to vilify anyone expressing a shred of skepticism toward politicians spending a fortune on often wasteful programs that produce little result. While not a Boomer myself, I sat in the car, frequently chastised for holding many of the views the author brands sociopathic. Paraphrasing a small section, the author literally paints the desire for a balanced budget and measured spending as "antiquated ideals with no basis in reality." I guess fiscal responsibility makes one an unhinged right wing nut! I find this amazing in light of the fact the author praises older generations for their conservative spirit, yet denigrates figures such as Barry Goldwater, Ludwig Von Mises, and many more right leaning thinkers, economists, and luminaries. While he does pay some negative attention to figures on the left, the political bent of the book comes across in unmistakeable fashion. Leftists reading this review, and listening to the book, will no doubt deny and rebuttal my opinion; much like they deny the bias in the modern main stream media. Thankfully we all have the right (at present time) to pick and choose our entertainment. Next time, at least have the temerity to spell out the aggressive political leanings of your argument in your book summary. Quit trying to fool your customer and reader.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • 200,000 Miles aboard the Destroyer Cotten

  • By: C. Snelling Robinson
  • Narrated by: James Killavey
  • Length: 14 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 559
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 521
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 516

In mid-1943, Snelling Robinson joined the crew of the Fletcher class destroyer USS Cotten as a newly commissioned ensign. The Cotten sailed to Pearl Harbor in time to join the Fifth Fleet. Under the command of Admiral Raymond Spruance, the Fifth Fleet participated in the invasions of Tarawa and Iwo Jima and several naval battles in the Philippine Sea and the Leyte Gulf.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding Book and Recording. Five Stars.

  • By Martin on 12-27-14

An Author's No Frills Autobio of Military Service

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-11-15

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend this book to historians with deep interest in World War II, and the actual mechanics and daily life aboard a Fletcher Class destroyer. 200,000 Miles recounts the three year service period of author C. Snelling Robinson in factual, straightforward detail, virtually devoid of drama or emotion found in similar works. Even when the author broaches subjects such as battle, death, or war time love, he does so in a septic, dry manner; providing the reader with factual details of the incident but little in the way of flowery language or adornment. I found the book fascinating in terms of the great wealth of information Robinson provides about the daily goings-on aboard the Cotten. A book that reads and sounds exactly as if written by a Navy junior grade lieutenant copying his daily events in a log.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

The ending of this book follow the format of the entire book, factual information related in a straightforward manner. You will not find any plots twists, surprise turns or "gotcha" moments.

What about James Killavey’s performance did you like?

I believe James Killavey conveyed a sense of the austerity, manner, and personality of the author through a monotone reading of the material. Killavey's peformance does little to enhance the language of the book, but I really think the material requires no adornment or enhancing. I don't believe most readers of this book expect a story couched in innuendo or oblique meaning. 200,000 Miles factually recounts Snelling's adventures during WWII and Killavey plays it straight.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The author's factual recount of his history, combined with the narrators monotone performance resulted in a smooth seamless autobiographical narrative that turns even battle scenes into checklists of casualties, equipment losses, and strategic objectives gained or lost. No moment in particular stood out in the narrative; with the exception, maybe, of Snelling's recount of casualties aboard several destroyers caught in a wild Pacific storm. In the end though, even that scene comes across as matter-of-fact. If possible, this book is the very personification of a WWII naval officer, mannerly, dutiful, factual and honest!

25 of 25 people found this review helpful

  • Dead Wake

  • The Last Crossing of the Lusitania
  • By: Erik Larson
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 13 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,521
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,462
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,443

On May 1, 1915, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were anxious. Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone, and for months, its U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Another fascinating non-fiction story from Larson

  • By Calliope on 03-03-18

Dead Wake Brings to Life the Lusitania

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-15

What other book might you compare Dead Wake to and why?

Dead Wake reminded me of Glenn Beck's Miracles and Massacres or Dreamers and Deceivers, a highly entertaining historical narrative. I found the book engrossing due to Erik Larson's excellent definition of the individuals involved in the sinking of the Lusitania, both infamous and famous, popular and unheralded, rich and poor. I found the now hundred year old detail about passengers lives and personalities enthralling. Larson and narrator Scott Brick brought the victims and transgressors to life, and humanized an event that previously existed in my memory as a historical tidbit of high school education.

Have you listened to any of Scott Brick’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I had not listened to a Scott Brick narration prior to Dead Wake, but the man clearly has talent, I enjoyed the narration and would readily purchase other titles narrated by Scott Brick.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Obviously the moments concerning the immediate sinking of the great ship Lusitania, and the panic engulfing the passengers and crew, the death, the destruction particularly moved my sense of empathy. Furthermore, the chapters post-sinking contain a great deal of sorrowful detail on the whereabouts or fate of the varying passengers. I found it particularly heart wrenching to hear stories of infants or small children, who no doubt found the situation terrifying and bewildering, many losing their lives or becoming temporarily or permanently orphaned.

Any additional comments?

I have only one regret regarding this title, that I failed to purchase Erik Larson's work sooner! I've had The Devil in the White City, and In the Garden of Beasts... on my wish lists for some time, but did not purchase the titles out of some unknown reticence or the lure of other titles. Now, I will definitely purchase these titles and other past or future Larson works. He needs no compliment on his abilities beyond the many accolades he has already accrued, but the man has a ton of literary talent, I'm a fan.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Inferno

  • A Novel
  • By: Dan Brown
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 17 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23,229
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,902
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 20,978

Harvard professor of symbology Robert Langdon awakens in a hospital in the middle of the night. Disoriented and suffering from a head wound, he recalls nothing of the last 36 hours, including how he got there...or the origin of the macabre object that his doctors discover hidden in his belongings. Langdon's world soon erupts into chaos, and he finds himself on the run in Florence with a stoic young woman, Sienna Brooks, whose clever maneuvering saves his life.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Formulaic and Hard to Finish....

  • By Livia on 06-15-13

Entertaining Dan Brown as Usual

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-14-13

Would you listen to Inferno again? Why?

I probably won't listen to Inferno again, although I found the first listen entertaining and memorable. Personally, this type of fiction is just a good escape and though I certainly don't share Robert Langdon's eidetic memory, mine functions quite well and will probably remember the story for a long time; so no need to reread, or in this case listen, to the book.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Inferno?

Without ruining the story for anyone, I enjoyed the vivid descriptions of St. Mark's Basilica!

What does Paul Michael bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

I enjoyed Paul Michael's reading of the story, he has a great voice. He brings a proper pronunciation of many Italian, Latin, and Turkish names that I would certainly mispronounce if left to my own reading. I did not, however, like the faked female voices and would have much preferred either a straight male voice reading of those parts, or a female actress. Personally, its a little weird hearing a man strain his voice to fake female tones.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

I plowed through this book in relatively little time, listening to it each chance I got which included a bunch of windshield time.

Any additional comments?

I find Dan Brown books really entertaining if a little unbelievable at points. They always seem to refresh my memory on historical and archeological locations; which in turns peaks my interest and gets me reading actual non-fiction about the places, persons, and history touched on in the Dan Brown story. I enjoyed Inferno, its classic Dan Brown and I think it will make an interesting movie as well.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Detroit

  • An American Autopsy
  • By: Charlie LeDuff
  • Narrated by: Eric Martin
  • Length: 7 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,054
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 953
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 948

In the heart of America, a metropolis is quietly destroying itself. Detroit, once the richest city in the nation, is now its poorest. Once the vanguard of America’s machine age - mass production, automobiles, and blue-collar jobs - Detroit is now America’s capital for unemployment, illiteracy, foreclosure, and dropouts. With the steel-eyed reportage that has become his trademark and the righteous indignation that only a native son can possess, journalist Charlie LeDuff sets out to uncover what has brought low this once-vibrant city, his city.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • WOW

  • By Avid Reader and Listener on 07-09-13

Car wreck fascinating

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-13

Was Detroit worth the listening time?

Detroit takes several story lines and weaves them together to give the reader a broad, but depressing, view of the largest bankrupt city in the world. The book revolves around Charles LeDuff's family experiences in the city, with a healthy dose of stories mixed in from his days as a Detroit newspaper journalist. It definitely held my interest, the power, corruption, death, and inability of Detroiters to quit swirling the drain by backing the same policies over and over definitely makes for a gripping story. It tends to blend together sometimes, and you have to pay attention to the plot line carefully, but Detroit's an interesting read none the less.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Six Days of War

  • June 1967 and the Making of the Modern Middle East
  • By: Michael B. Oren
  • Narrated by: Robert Whitfield
  • Length: 17 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,604
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,123
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,120

In Israel and the West, it is called the Six Day War. In the Arab world, it is known as the June War or, simply, as "the Setback". Never has a conflict so short, unforeseen, and largely unwanted by both sides so transformed the world. The Yom Kippur War, the war in Lebanon, the Camp David accords, the controversy over Jerusalem and Jewish settlements in the West Bank, the intifada, and the rise of Palestinian terror are all part of the outcome of those six days.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Really 2 Books in One . . .

  • By Tim on 04-05-06

Chocked full of historical perspective.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-25-13

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I would strive to make the first half of the book more entertaining. I found the first half a little dull; yes, packed with necessary information about causes, and relevant facts and vignettes that lead to the war, but dry none-the-less. Maybe my anticipation of learning insight about the strategy and tactics employed in the actual battles ruined my appreciation of the build-up in the book.

Also, as a person unfamiliar with arabic names, I found it somewhat difficult to understand some of the pronunciations and found myself backtracking to avoid missing important facts. Overall though, a good book packed with a lot of interesting information about the Six Day War.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Outliers

  • The Story of Success
  • By: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Gladwell
  • Length: 7 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,028
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,098
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,076

In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers" - the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful. He asks the question: what makes high achievers different? His answer is that we pay too much attention to what successful people are like and too little attention to where they are from: that is, their culture, their family, their generation, and the idiosyncratic experiences of their upbringing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Captivating (if not an outlier)

  • By KHarrang on 11-21-08

Entertaining and thought provoking!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-24-13

If you could sum up Outliers in three words, what would they be?

intriguing, entertaining, useful

Any additional comments?

Outliers connects the dots on seemingly unrelated subjects and makes a convincing argument for the role that circumstances, luck, and advantages play in the success of popular, wealthy, and notable figures. Interesting and useful in a way, especially in regard to planning education and children's involvement in sports! Example: makes me want to hold back my young pre-kinder child instead of starting her early, for an explanation, read the book!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful