LISTENER

Lanna S. Seuret

Sacramento, California
  • 45
  • reviews
  • 65
  • helpful votes
  • 158
  • ratings
  • Jurassic Park

  • A Novel
  • By: Michael Crichton
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 15 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,832
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,271
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,255

Audie Award, Science Fiction, 2016. An astonishing technique for recovering and cloning dinosaur DNA has been discovered. Now humankind's most thrilling fantasies have come true. Creatures extinct for eons roam Jurassic Park with their awesome presence and profound mystery, and all the world can visit them - for a price.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • CHAOS THEORY

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 01-30-16

MORE SCIENCE; CLIMAX INTERMINABLE TERROR

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-18

Having gone through my missing childhood Dinosaur period with my son when he was little, I've loved them since, avidly reading new theories, and loving all books with beautiful illustrations, wanting to see what it would have been like to be an eyewitness. When "Jurassic Park" movie came out, I was excited by most of the cast, and especially the gorgeous, wonderful CGI creations.

Now years later, deciding to read the novel, the initial pages revealed even more detail and science than the film, and more fully developed characters, a delight. But that soon enough passed into the setup for disaster, and a far too protracted climax of one disaster after another, without relief or hope. You could see Chrichton's thesis was "Messing with profound Nature is asking for Unintended and probably Highly Dangerous Consequences" early on. It made sense because life, of course, wants to survive, and the measure of it is that it tries to solve the problems its environment presents in order to keep living. However, what I expected was a little relief from the clash of human shortsightedness, and maybe a laugh or two, instead of steady, unrelenting tragedy. This formed a majority of the book, leaving very little for the denouement but a dullness of despair. It became interminable, absolutely humorless, and depressing. I decided even the last few minutes - maybe 15 or 20? - weren't even worth the listen to find out who MIGHT get off the island with life and limbs intact.

The characters were generally more differentiated and developed in the novel, but also generally less humorous and with stronger contrast to one another, the entrepreneur and uncle proving, for example, to be absolutely
tyrannical, unable to see ANY perspective beyond his dream, even when his brilliant and supportive staff had been eaten or killed one by one, and there appeared to be no one left to run the computerized systems, and the
dinosaurs (the raptors were the brilliant, intuitive pack hunters) had figured out how to breach the fortresslike
defenses, including patiently and methodically jumping on steel bars over windows in order to gain entrance.
He just became morbidly whiny, wondering why the computers wouldn't work, and thinking he would just walk out the front door of the only relatively safe building, trying to find someone who could help.

Malcolm, the mathematician, slowly became a favorite character, because, unlike the movie character, he did not
form a love triangle with the pretty paleobotanist, and the archeologist/biologist; he was a detached observer, answering questions when asked, but not proselytizing, or trying to force his viewpoint. However, as in the film, his leg was bitten and injured, but contacting the medical helicopter was becoming increasingly hopeless, and he, alas, seemed to be dying.

The paleobiolgist professor was much more interesting, strong, and well rounded, even really liking and respecting kids, particularly the boy and girl attending the trip. The boy was the elder here, quite fascinated and informed about dinosaurs, smart and resourceful as well. In the end, just because he made an effort to figure out the computers,even when it seemed overwhelming, became a little hero. The professor's assistant, the very pretty paleobotantist, was not drool ingly in love with him, hoping he'd change, but independent in her own research and life.

The other characters were well created and much more understandable. Even the "bad" guy who succumbed to temptation to steal the frozen embryos had a triggering event with the despotic uncle who refused to pay him extra for extra research, blackmailing him into submission. I don't excuse the crime, but Chrichton wisely gave him two sides, just like the uncle who seemed such a well meaning, inspired genius creator, but was unable and
unwilling to see any viewpoint but his own, which caused many people their very lives. Whew!

Looking back , it was worthwhile to get more science, but once past that, the consequence of tragedy went on faaarrrr tooooo looong for this little head.

  • The Cat Who Had 60 Whiskers

  • By: Lilian Jackson Braun
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 3 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 252
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 167
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 165

Times are changing in Pickax, and it all makes for some newsworthy notes for the "Qwill Pen". A new senior center is in the works, and a frisky production of Cats is set to delight Moose County residents, human and feline alike. Polly Duncan is off to Paris, momentarily leaving Qwill without a companion for his apple-barn concerts, and The Librarians Who Lunch are getting read to put on a show of their spectacular Art Hats to help unite Pickax with its Lockmaster County neighbors.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • No,no,no!

  • By Sharon on 02-24-07

Whoops! Where Did The Mystery Go?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-17

Any additional comments?

I missed checking the running time, but, liking the narrator and characters in the sample, purchased it as an entry experience. Meeting all the characters, including the intuitive, or
perhaps parasympathetic/prescient Siamese cats was cheerful, neighborly and fun.

This story ended about half the time the other stories run, and, indeed, I was just feeling comfy and oriented to who is whom, when the story ended with the closing credits!

The only suggestion of a mystery was the fact that the main character's alternate living quarters, an enviable old apple barn, possessively nicknamed "The Barn" as a nod to history which included this huge building as a landmark for the whole town, was vandalized and set afire.

But nothing was done nor did any action follow! Just George Guidell (whom I follow whenever there's a choice) as narrator wishing us well!!!

Half a story is not worth a whole credit; I notice the reviewers of the two previous books
were also disappointed, so, though not enumerated, this story may be in this period of
sad decline, so I don't want to recommend it unless you've heard all the other stories to
your heart's content and just want to add this to your list of the series.

I'm surprised and disappointed, but determined to be a bit more careful, and listen to earlier
stories in the series with good, not general reviews.




1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Squanto and the First Thanksgiving: The Legendary American Tale

  • Rabbit Ears' Holiday Classics
  • By: Eric Metaxas
  • Narrated by: Graham Greene
  • Length: 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38

Discover the moving, true story of the Native American named Squanto, who is captured from his beloved Pawtuxet tribe, taken to Spain, and sold into slavery. Years later, Squanto regains his freedom and embarks on a miraculous journey back to his homeland where he teaches the Pilgrims how to survive the difficult early years in the Plymouth colony - culminating in the first Thanksgiving celebration.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • AT LAST! THE OTHER SIDE OF THANKSGIVING STORY.

  • By Lanna S. Seuret on 11-24-16

AT LAST! THE OTHER SIDE OF THANKSGIVING STORY.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-24-16

Any additional comments?

A fan of Graham Greene since "Dances With Wolves", who leaves behind his quirky humor in this story, and gives a feeling reading, I also am thankful to the author, Mr. Metaxes, who did such a nice job telling what it was like to be an Indian/First People before the Pilgrims landed, and how Squanto, after being unwillingly captured, taken to Spain and finally returned, made an extraordinary coincidence by meeting up with the first Pilgrims, speaking English. The dinner
sounded authentic, and delicious. Would I so love to include lobster and mussels at this historical dinner! But, at least I can add succotash, another dish that ran true for the time because Indians
did grow the "THree Sisters": corn, beans and squash.

I took off just one star for the music, which at times was irritating and invasive, not really adding to
or enhancing the mood.

This is a family story,worthwhile for both children and adults.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Bernie Sanders

  • A Biography of the Socialist Running for President
  • By: Benjamin Southerland
  • Narrated by: 5395 Media LLC
  • Length: 1 hr and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6

In Bernie Sanders: A Biography of the Socialist Running for President, you will learn about the life, career, and ambitions of Bernie Sanders. The Vermont senator has shaken up the race for the 2016 Democratic nomination for president, challenging the front-runner Hillary Clinton. Sanders has a long history of activism, dating back to his college years, when he was involved in the Civil Rights Movement. Sanders has drawn praise for his consistent positions and for standing up for the middle class.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I VOTED FOR BERNIE ANYWAY!

  • By Lanna S. Seuret on 11-19-16

I VOTED FOR BERNIE ANYWAY!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-16

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Two girlfriends told me about Bernie over a year ago, and after a speech excerpt or two, I knew he was virtuous, serious and spoke for the 99%. How can we want anything else except an economy and politics which works for us all? This little book is an excellent,
clear, and sensible short introduction to Bernie's person and background. It gave me grounding for my positive feelings toward him as it explained that his message has always been the same values throughout his whole career, more or less starting in high
school. He certainly has a necessary place in ANY debate,discussion or speech, and I look forward to the time when we have actual subject covered which include the numerically lesser candidates. (I could not stomach listening to the inane stupidity, trumpery, and **** filled mud slinging between the two major runners.)

If you are now at leisure to find out some basics about Bernie, I highly recommend this
book by Benjamin Sutherland. You'll learn a lot in 2 or 3 commutes.

The narrator was someone for non fiction whom I would like again. He only mispronounced two or three words, but this was little noticeable as his whole delivery
was well paced, just expressive enough for the subject, clear and bold; overall quite
pleasant.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Twelve Dogs of Christmas

  • An Andy Carpenter Mystery
  • By: David Rosenfelt
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 6 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 886
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 817
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 809

Defense lawyer Andy Carpenter usually tries to avoid taking on new cases at all costs. But this time, he's happy - eager, even - to take the case that's just come his way. Andy's long-time friend Martha "Pups" Boyer takes in stray puppies that the local dog rescue center can't handle, raises them until they're old enough to adopt, and then finds good homes for them. Not everyone admires the work Pups does as much as Andy does, however.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a fun story!

  • By Kathi on 10-31-16

TWELVE PUPPIES, A CRANKY SAINT + ANDY CARPENTER!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-01-16

Any additional comments?

To my memory, this is the first time Andy takes on a female client, a saviour to new doggy litters which would otherwise be euthanized, but nevertheless a cranky, no nonsense person who seems to alienate others with her frosty comments while championing the babies which cannot be sent to normal shelters. (This is something I didn't know.) Being the only one in town who does this, she earns the sobriquet "Pups."

Once again, I am amazed at David Rosenfeldt's brilliance as a mystery writer: he has a
bag of tricks that keeps you on the edge of your seat and totally interested while you are feeling a mix of hope, heart and safety combined with fear and anxiety for the lives of those you want to protect, plus admiration for the cleverness of the underworld which is
pulling some hidden and mysterious strings, yet to be revealed.

This is a good story,though not especially a family Christmas one. Pups, now a widow of
a long time, loving marriage to an equally good hearted man whose mission was to save
land and natural space for posterity (think of Teddy Rosevelt saving Yellowstone) seems to have been tricked into the appearance of murdering a neighbor who called the authorities when she harbored and excessive number of newborns in her home.

To make it more dramatic, she is slowly dying of an unusual disease. She trusts Andy,
and wants to die with her loving purpose of saving lives and reputation intact, not as a
murderer. Can this very interesting and tangled mystery be solved before her death?

As always, Andy, in his rugged though humorous acceptance of life,and personal shortcomings, manages to weave in the clever and talented work of his many peopled support group (any of whom you might like to meet - except maybe monosyllabic Marcus, a monster of the correct doses of help under pressure - and take to coffee) within deadline, despite vagaries of disappearing witnesses and court appearances.

Right now I couldn't bear to read any other than his Andy Carpenter mysteries. Andy, and his cadre are my rocks. He is braver, with more integrity than he thinks, and it is
this ability to face down "evil" at great odds, that always give me a sense of rightness and puts a smile when I cheer the end of the story! VIVA Andy! VIVA David!

  • White Colander Crime

  • Vintage Kitchen Mystery Series #5
  • By: Victoria Hamilton
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 9 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 121
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 107

Queensville has great expectations for their Dickens Days festival. A tourist-trade boom means a big turnout for the opening of Queensville Historic Manor and, for Jaymie Leighton, food columnist and vintage cookware collector, a chance to promote the manor and give away homemade goodies. At the end of a long day of festival fun, Jaymie discovers the battered body of local woman Shelby Fretter.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • EXCELLENT STORY BUT MORE GRISLY MURDER

  • By Lanna S. Seuret on 06-06-16

EXCELLENT STORY BUT MORE GRISLY MURDER

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-16

Any additional comments?

The author seemed to be in her stride with this tale: Jaimie's delightful ability to be a hub in her community and a caring, available good friend is very smooth; her gorgeous new beau is the kind of man a spiritually and psychologically healthy woman would want; her business and volunteerism are going well, and, she seems gently determined to avoid being where any future murder will happen, and to not be the first to discover it, as seems to happen with her. She really can't help it; they just seem to occur nearby!

It is late autumn, nearly winter, when she and many others are preparing for Dicken Days, to be celebrated in both downtown Queensville (how I would like to visit there!) and the newly renovated Historic Mansion, with an authentic old stove Jaimie will be using to bake her contribution of treats to sell.

One evening, needing to check on something in the kitchen's larder, she bundles up and trundles to the Mansion on slippery sidewalks, and finds, to her, and our, deep distress, even horror, a young woman with a somewhat confused and dubious reputation, nearly dead, her head bleeding, maybe broken. Jaimie nearly panics because she did not bring her phone for what was supposed to be a quick trip, but runs out and collars some help.
The young girl sadly,does not improve, expiring during the night.

Jaimie feels unhappy with her inability to help and, contrary to her promise to the Chief of Police, does her own, this time , subtle and more quiet investigation.

Here the author shines; the obvious suspect is Jaimie's own boss' son. even we believe he could have done it, but Jaimie finds many other threads leading to many others with interesting involvement and possible dark motive.

This part of the story is enthralling. But, you will be surprised at the conclusion!

All in all, I have enjoyed this series. The author introduces and familiarizes you with the characters most prevalent, so you don't get lost, retaining clear mental pictures of them. The stories have love, connection, friendship, community as background for the shock of the murders, so you feel that life and people are basically good. The unveiling of the suspects is always interesting, and you'll never be bored; your attention is captured but you can knit or sew or do something that doesn't require a lot of brain power and be simultaneously entertained.

I do recommend listening to them in order because, one, the first and last mysteries are the best, and two,you will get to share Jaimie's growth, and friendships as she negotiates through the upsetting loss of a long time boyfriend, becoming more confident in what she loves and getting better at making these talents a real contribution to herself and others.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • No Mallets Intended

  • Vintage Kitchen Mystery Series #4
  • By: Victoria Hamilton
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 108
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 106

The Queensville Heritage Society is restoring the once-grand Dumpe Manor. While Dumpe relatives and society members use the occasion to dust off old grudges, Jaymie Leighton prefers to adorn the kitchen with authentic Depression-era furnishings. A collection of vintage wooden mallets found in the house is a perfect addition to her display, but one also offers a late-night intruder the perfect weapon to knock Jaymie unconscious before escaping.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best one yet!

  • By Kimberly Robertson on 03-28-16

IT'S OFFICIAL: SHE'S A "NATURAL DETECTIVE!"

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-16

Any additional comments?

So says Chief of Police Ledbetter, quite sincerely, valuing her observations, curiosity and intuition. Others, who experience the consequences of her amateur investigations, call her Snoop.

Other reviewers have very well covered the main plot of this story, the Historical Society purchase of an old mansion with cellars and attics, hidey holes and hardwood floors.
Jaimie has been asked by them to put the kitchen to vintage rights, one of her several occupations and delights.

What delights me about this author is how she creates and integrates her heroine into this matrix of vintage home, friendships, firm values of loyalty and support to those friends, an interesting geographical location (northern Michigan, a ferry ride to Canada),the cultural celebrations and holidays, which she skillfully makes the center focus around/during or within which some murder occurs; family, a growing sense of self, creative contribution, and place for the heroine, coupled with interesting, though sometimes dysfunctional romantic interests, and of course, cozy "companion animals."

This is my third audio book of the series (skipped # 2, though may go back), and I feel more trust in how the author involves and treats Jaimie Leighton, the protagonist.

Jaimie's intuition and curiosity is often in conflict with her sense of safety AND in failing to reveal what might be time and life saving information to the Chief of Police, who has not quite officially, but honestly acknowledged her abilities, both as a woman and person (cool!), in order to invite her willingness to share that information. I respect and admire when she feels same to be incomplete or may possibly make a friend a suspect in the investigation, she refuses to reveal it. To me, that shows a lot of self respect and trust,and courage to stand up to the possible consequences.

Also the author is just plain clever in how she manages to create a quite complex murder. There are just enough revolting or horrid people to make you wonder, but the threads of connection are only slowly revealed, and usually sewn together, one or two at a time, by Jaimie. It's like a drawstring slowly pulling which then suddenly closes.

I'm used to Sherlock Holmes and Watson, logical mysteries, which reveal a stepping stone series of clues you can follow to the brilliant and cleverly hidden conclusion.

However, there is no complaint here. Sometimes I feel unhappy that the narrator sounds too emphatic, making Jaimie's speech seem inane or too shrieky; but overall, both the narrator and author create good characterization and generally keep track of the characters as they move in and out of the story.

On that note, this time, though, in the last story, the son of the murdered man, now freed to follow his skills and purpose, did a wonderful job on landscaping Jaimie's mostlybarren back lawn; I would have liked just a reference to how much she appreciated it,and how it looked in the fall. The author however, handled Jaimie's current love interest, Daniel, very well, signaling enough warning signs that you knew there had to be someresolution. Further, the "maybe" possible love interest, handsome Detective Zack Christian who had chosen a job in another city, was handled very satisfactorily, with good communication between him and Jaimie. I hate it when people you have gotten toknow and have interest in are just discarded with no notice or reason.

Yes, this is a more philosophical than informative review, but I am pleased to finally grok the pattern of the story; it's comforting. Now, the variations and detailscan be more front and center; I don't have to worry about the heroine's life or safety.

  • Freezer I'll Shoot

  • Vintage Kitchen Mystery Series, Book 3
  • By: Victoria Hamilton
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 8 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 143
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 129
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130

Trying to escape her overbearing mother, vintage kitchenware enthusiast and soon-to-be columnist Jaymie Leighton retreats to her family's cottage on Heartbreak Island. While there she hopes to write an article about the Ice House restaurant, owned by good friends and neighbors, siblings Ruby and Garnet Redmond. Once an actual icehouse, the restaurant is charmingly decorated with antique tools of the trade, including a collection of ice picks.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Vintage kitchen tools and mystery

  • By Byron on 08-30-14

ACCUSTOMING TO HEROINE'S AMATEUR DETECTIVE STATUS

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-05-16

What made the experience of listening to Freezer I'll Shoot the most enjoyable?

(Pre confession: Based on some reviews, I skipped book two.) I've now accepted the
fact that the murders will aways be coming to Jaimie, the main character and protagonist; and, that she is too curious and intelligent to leave the police to do all the addition of facts. In the first book, being privy to the gossip agonized me; now I realize this, especially in a small, comfortable town, is the vehicle for forwarding the action of the story, and, the gossip is not frivolous - or just enough to keep you interested and wondering.

In this story, Jaimie is through grieving her former long term boyfriend, Joel, even though he's still in town with his new girlfriend, now fiancee' Heidi; and is happily on comfortable terms with her dating partner, Daniel, even though he would like to move faster, and she defines their relationship as a 6 month trial period, after which they will decide together which path to take. I really like that she is clear about her likes and limits with Daniel, being equally clear about her somewhat confused physical attraction to Detective Zach
Christian.

This time a maligned and ill liked businessman is found stabbed with a vintage ice pick on her lower grassy property, which was being dug up to replace the sewer and leach lines. No murder is really lovely, and this one, combining the vintage ice pick, the
history of which she was going to write in her first newspaper column is equally horrifying.

Meeting and interacting with all the town folks, how they add such color, texture, friendship and interest, forming the matrixes of each murder , does make it cozy for me.
Jaimie supports and is supported by her many friends, and this creates a lot of stability
to lean on when she "inadvertently" ends up facing the true murderer.

The geography, history and culture of this small border (Michigan/Canada) town is really picturesque. This time I learned Canada has a Thanksgiving in October, which her
family has always celebrated, followed by the US Thanksgiving in November.

I also really enjoy the vintage tools, kitchen implements, and historical food recipes, which were less in evidence this novel than Number 1. I'm really curious what foods she puts in her "Vintage Basket" lunches!

The narrator in the first novel did well on all the voices except the Carribean owner of the next door B & B; it was barely distinguishable. This time, she maintains most distinguishing characteristics, but the a few of the younger women sound the same, and a few of the adult men may sound the same. Overall, it is a pretty good match.

For now, for the ease, I will probably continue the series. You may notice the titles are
subtle portents.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Deadly Grind

  • Vintage Kitchen Mystery Series, # 1
  • By: Victoria Hamilton
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 9 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 995
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 901
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 899

When vintage cookware and cookbook collector Jaymie Leighton spies an original 1920s Hoosier brand kitchen cabinet at an estate auction, it's love at first sight. Despite the protests of her sister that the 19th-century yellow-brick house they share in Michigan is already too cluttered with Jaymie's "junk," she successfully outbids the other buyers and triumphantly takes home her Hoosier.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • History can be deadly in this cozy mystery!

  • By Byron on 04-28-14

COZY BEGINNING; SCARY ENDING

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-03-16

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Needing a break from historical, intellectual mysteries, and piqued by the puns in the titles, I thought this worth trying.

The modern setting takes place in northern Michigan a ferry's crossing from Canada, with blended cultural events, in a small tourist- attractive town. The heroine, Jaimie, and her sister, Becca, inherited a wonderful old house there. Becca only comes some week-
ends, Jaimie's heart and body inhabit, and decorate, and fill it year round. Becca has a
china replacement business, and is the elder by a dozen years; Jaimie, only 32, is still
figuring out her life, but to me, seems to be happy, busy, connected with and helpful to her friends and neighbors, loving her little dog and big cat, while collecting interesting antiques of kitchen related kind, and is secretly writing her first book, an edited collection of vintage recipes. Her main challenge at the moment is that her boyfriend of several years just left her for another woman the very next morning after a warm, affectionate date, without explanation or word. It is six months later and she is still grieving somewhat, mainly due to the lack of communication and honesty.

Then, the night after a stimulating auction where she purchased an antique Hoosier cabinet, she is awakened by one of those disturbing dreams which incorporates the sounds and feelings from inexplicable events occurring before one regains consciousness. . A stranger has been hit on the back of the head with the
heavy metal meat grinder, part of the accoutrement to the Hoosier. Awakened by her
dog, and the thuds, she stumbles downstairs to murder.

Thus ensues an interesting pursuit of the mystery, which involves many people, many her old friends and new ones, with the charming events of the town preparing for the
tourist season as an integrated background.

The author has a good grasp on how to make an intricate, slowly unfolding mystery, so the reader maintains interest, but for me, Jaimie's personality wavered. Sometimes she was brave, and sometimes foolhardy, other times out of touch to what would be normal
feelings and good sense for a situation. I did get exasperated at times, even freaked a couple of times which wasn't comfortable. ( I like to feel the "detective" has the higher moral and intellectual ground.) As one murder turned into several, I didn't foresee her
being threatened (although the blurb gives hint), and did feel scared when she was. Maybe you wouldn't.

The denouement was too close to the scary part for me; I needed more confidence that at least she learned from her actions. However, I grew to like her friends, the town and its history, her overall character. I loved the part where she tracked down the previous
owner of the Hoosier who inherited it from his parents, and had a story to tell. That was
almost worth the whole book.

By the way, I own a Hoosier cabinet, and though it lacked a meat grinder, the other parts were real. If it would add to your pleasure, finding a picture of the cabinet may be worthwhile. They were the piece that brought a kitchen together and made it work.

  • Royall House

  • By: Jerry Robbins
  • Narrated by: Jerry Robbins, Shana Dirik, J.T. Turner, and others
  • Length: 3 hrs and 34 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9

Alexander and Tobias Royall: two brothers. One smuggles tea to New England ports on his ships to avoid paying an unjust tax. The other is a prominent lawyer who supports the crown. One resides in Royall House East, the other in Royall House West. Both have wives and children who also have their various political beliefs.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • WONDERFUL STORY

  • By Warren2013 on 12-14-15

GREAT HISTORY; MAXI-DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILY!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-16

Any additional comments?

I have and love almost all of the historical dramas by CRP. Royall House offers excellent insight into the prejudice, secrets and tensions during the lead up to our REVOLUTIONARY WAR through the personages of Royall House: Tobias Royall, barrister or attorney, the elder, more balanced in viewpoint, though taking the conservative, Tory, support the King even if he's wrong line versus Alexander Royall, an intelligent but fierce very successful ship's captain who detests the lack of courtesy by the King in imposing taxes on the India tea import without getting the Colonial's feedback first. He himself is
dodging the now unpopular India tea by smuggling Dutch tea; however he knows the danger of this, and has taken steps. This part of the story is fine, fun and insightful. You know all families have differences of opinion and choices in life to make. This can even be interesting if people have love and acceptance, and don't force expectations or standards on one another. However, this part of the story for me is just too vicious: one of the elder boys is actually sociopathic, others of the children of both families are loving, innocent and judicious, the mothers are both living lives of repression and unhappiness and end up taking out their frustrations on everyone. High drama it is that accompanies this otherwise interesting story, the ending of which has a positive note, but, with all the anger, accusation and active, blaming frustration, you just don't feel happy at the end. I would have liked less viciousness, less anger and accusation, and still have kept the revelations and differences, but worked them out with responsibility, transformation and maybe a bit
of caring.