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Andrew

MURFREESBORO, TENNESSEE, United States
  • 45
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  • 101
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  • 53
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  • Letters to the Church

  • By: Francis Chan
  • Narrated by: Ramon de Ocampo
  • Length: 5 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,122
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 981
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 969

Millions are satisfied to sit through hour-long, weekly religious services. Millions more have left the church, brokenhearted and cynical. But God is waking up his people - people who will risk everything and sacrifice anything to become the dynamic, powerful church seen in Scripture. We Are Church calls Christ-followers, young and old, to hold fast to their biblical roots while seeking radical change. Scripture promises an exuberant and unstoppable church. That wondrous early church of acts can be our reality today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stings

  • By Raeshan Peterson on 09-16-18

Recognition of the Early Church, and How It’s Changed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-09-19

I’ve read a couple of Francis Chan’s books already and, while his books have opened my eyes, it’s the Bible that should be doing this and he speaks of how many churches have become simply a weekly occurrence, not the brotherhood in Christ’s day and when the Holy Spirit came upon them. Of course, not all churches have failed in their attempts to reach the lost. The church where I was saved a few years ago has three Sunday morning services with God-uplifting music and amazing messages, very imtimate despite the hundreds present.

I found Letters to the Church to be marvelous. Not only did Francis show me ways I’ve thought incorrectly, he showed me the Bible’s words to make me recognize and begin to correct my misbehavior. I’ll certainly return to this book for motivation and reminders of my proper path, but not as much as my Bible. Thank you, Francis Chan, for your work!

Thanks to Ramon de Ocampo, too, for an eloquent, excellent reading, detecting both humorous and stern portions and performing very well.

  • Murder on the Orient Express [Movie Tie-in]

  • A Hercule Poirot Mystery
  • By: Agatha Christie
  • Narrated by: Kenneth Branagh
  • Length: 6 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,136
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,057
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,050

Just after midnight, the famous Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snowdrift. By morning, the millionaire Samuel Edward Ratchett lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. One of his fellow passengers must be the murderer.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best Possible Version of the Classic Whodunit

  • By Brian Abel Ragen on 11-10-17

Well-Written and Well-Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-18

First, I saw the movie, then decided to read the book. While the film is certainly a spectacle of great cinematography, it gives only a little bit of credit to the genius Agatha Christie invested in the story and the character of Hercule Poirot.

I was amazed to find that Poirot essentially understands the solution very early in the book, not at the end of the film which was adapted. Reading Poirot’s brilliance in conducting interviews and even conversing with M Bouc and Dr Constantine, a character not in the film, is amazing. And to display such an elaborate and well-thinking mind must come from an author of similar brilliance. This is the first book by Agatha Christie that I’ve read, but it will not be the last.

  • Forgotten God

  • Remembering Our Crucial Need for the Holy Spirit
  • By: Francis Chan
  • Narrated by: Francis Chan
  • Length: 4 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,396
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,148
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,140

A follow up to the profound message of Crazy Love, Pastor Francis Chan offers a compelling invitation to understand, embrace, and follow the Holy Spirit's direction in our lives. "In the name of the Father, the Son, and ... the Holy Spirit." We pray in the name of all three, but how often do we live with an awareness of only the first two?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Spirit: the Power of Christ in Us

  • By Greg on 02-16-12

Perfect Timing in My Life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

My pastor is currently teaching a sermon series on the book of Acts, and Francis Chan’s book, Forgotten God: Reversing Our Tragic Neglect of the Holy Spirit, could not have been read/heard at a more amazing time, not just because it speaks greatly of the book of Acts, but because of my need for the Holy Spirit. The audiobook says “Remembering Our Crucial Need” while the paperback book I own says “Reversing Our Tragic Neglect,” and, while there is a crucial need for the Holy Spirit, the book certainly tells of the tendency for me to neglect what I need.

Francis Chan also read the book, so his audio is filled with enthusiasm and hope that the reader/listener will come to a loving relationship with the Holy Spirit, a gift from God, and that I will submit and obey what the Lord commands through His Counselor.

  • Crazy Love (Revised and Updated)

  • Overwhelmed by a Relentless God
  • By: Francis Chan
  • Narrated by: Francis Chan
  • Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,198
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,896
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,888

The God of the universe - the Creator of nitrogen and pine needles, galaxies and E-minor - loves us with a radical, unconditional, self-sacrificing love. And what is our typical response? We go to church, sing songs, and try not to cuss. Are you hungry for an authentic faith that addresses the problems of our world with tangible, even radical, solutions? God is calling you to a passionate love relationship with Himself. Because the answer to religious complacency isn’t working harder at a list of do's and don'ts - it's falling in love with God.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Blessing

  • By Red on 11-02-13

Eye-Opening and Truth-Telling

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

Crazy Love is a wonderful book that speaks volumes as to God’s wishes for our lives and our, or I’ll say my, blatant refusal of His gifts. I know that my own fear us losing a friend has kept me from sharing God’s Word, and this reflects on my commitment to Him, not fully committed and thinking of myself more than others. This book, as well as prayer and reflection in scripture, has opened my eyes as to how much more vigilant I must be as God uses me to bring others to Him.

Francis Chan is a great author and excellent narrator, getting especially passionate in the extra chapter of this updated edition. His words are very motivational and he consistently uses God’s Word to back up what he says. Very nicely done, sir!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Cost of Discipleship

  • By: Dietrich Bonhoeffer
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 9 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,158
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 931
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 927

What can the call to discipleship, the adherence to the word of Jesus, mean today to the businessman, the soldier, the laborer, or the aristocrat? What did Jesus mean to say to us? What is his will for us today? Drawing on the Sermon on the Mount, Dietrich Bonhoeffer answers these timeless questions by providing a seminal reading of the dichotomy between "cheap grace" and "costly grace."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Get this book

  • By Jennifer L. Conover on 03-02-10

Intelligent and Theological

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-22-18

This book is sometimes difficult to follow due to Bonhoeffer’s explanations of a thesis, but this is what makes it easy to understand once you’re ready to dig in. As a simple-minded analogy I’ll put it this way: it could be easy to say that A is the same as G; but Bonhoeffer goes through the steps (A is the same as B due to ..., B equals C because of..., etc) in order to explain his thoughts and he does so very well.

My favorite portion of the book was in the second part, where Bonhoeffer explains the Sermon on the Mount. This is amazing for a couple of reasons. First, Jesus’ statements are examined nearly word for word and, second, it is done very matter of factly, where each chapter is only a few pages long. Straight to the point.

The only thing I didn’t like about the performance was that the narrator, Paul Michael, did not read the footnotes (some of which were very long but important) or pronounce words in Greek and, when more than a few Bible verses were put in parenthesis because they discussed the subject of the sentence, they were sometimes skipped over.

Aside from that, Paul Michael did a fantastic job of reading Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s book with great enthusiasm!

  • Papillon

  • By: Henri Charriere
  • Narrated by: Michael Prichard
  • Length: 18 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 472
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 428
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 425

Sentenced to life imprisonment in the penal colony of French Guiana for a crime he did not commit, Henri Charriere became obsessed with one goal: escape. After planning and executing a series of treacherous yet failed attempts over many years, he was eventually sent to the notorious prison Devil's Island, a place from which no one had ever escaped - until Papillon.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A must read, if human nature matters to you!

  • By kieu on 11-14-13

Amazing from the Get-Go!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-18

While some aspects of this autobiographical novel have been embellished, Henri Charriere’s intelligence and eloquence is not. There are articles that say there are no records of him being in the Diable prison, it is a small, invented aspect to a rather adventurous journey.

From the opening paragraphs I was enthralled by the dramatic narration of his trial and the start of his prison sentences. Even more amazing is the interaction he had with Indians who took him in after his first escape and how he threw that life away as if he inspected a freshly fallen apple saying “No good,” and tossed it to the side.

Papillion’s intelligence is checked at that point, but it is shown again in the deals that he made with fellow prisoners, guards, and wardens. Granted, as an autobiography, some of these aspects could’ve been written to give us a better view of Charriere, but you find yourself rooting for him nonetheless.

Michael Prichard was a great narrator, but didn’t distinguish various voices (whether male or female), so it was sometimes difficult to understand who was speaking when a conversation involving more than two people took place. Aside from that, he did a wonderful job.

  • So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish

  • By: Douglas Adams
  • Narrated by: Martin Freeman
  • Length: 4 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,586
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,995
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,993

Back on Earth with nothing more to show for his long, strange trip through time and space than a ratty towel and a plastic shopping bag, Arthur Dent is ready to believe that the past eight years were all just a figment of his stressed-out imagination. But a gift-wrapped fishbowl with a cryptic inscription, the mysterious disappearance of Earth's dolphins, and the discovery of his battered copy of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy all conspire to give Arthur the sneaking suspicion that something otherworldly is indeed going on.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • In love with the girl

  • By Dusty Harrison on 10-15-15

One of the Better Stories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-18

In my opinion, So Long, and Thanks for all the Fish is one of the better stories in the Hitchhiker’s Guide collection. Granted, it strays away from Zaphod and Trillian - barely mentioning them - as well as Ford, but it does go into romance for Arthur. I’m not a fellow into romantic novels, but the subtlety of Arthur’s yearning for companionship and his chance to take hold of it are great.

It is important to keep in mind that much of what takes place in this story has very little to do with the previous stories, and there even some conflict in timeline if you consider the story to be part of a series. But, this and the other stories - Hitchhiker’s Guide..., Restaurant..., Life..., Mostly Harmless - were written independently of each other. So, it’s best to know a little background and read them as independent stories.

Douglas Adams had an amazingly creative mind. So creative that, if you thought he hadn’t imagined a thing in his life and put it to paper, you would be as wrong as a person trying to hail a taxi with just a middle finger. Such sentences as the previous one was certainly his style and, though they can be exhausting after a while, and sometimes they distract from the story, it is only for a moment and you’re amazing at the man’s imagination. (I am, at least.)

Martin Freeman did a wonderful job narrating this story, also. Well done!

  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • By: Douglas Adams
  • Narrated by: Stephen Fry
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,823
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 27,993
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27,992

Seconds before the Earth is demolished to make way for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is plucked off the planet by his friend Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised edition of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy who, for the last 15 years, has been posing as an out-of-work actor.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • HHTGH - Lightly Fried

  • By J. Medany on 05-08-05

Wonderfully Creative and Fun!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-01-18

While I had first seen the film, I had to dive into the book understanding that not everything I loved about the movie would be inside this story - perhaps in the remainder of the series. Putting that aside, the story is fantastic, with Arthur learning about the vastness of the universe and, in the end, the importance of his life while he thinks of himself as a simple man in a simple world.

Douglas Adams’s creativity is amazing in both character and dialogue. The story is not long, but it is energetic and full of fun, and Adams keeps the pace and energy of the book with asides and chapters that are less than a page long. (I read along while listening.)

Stephen Fry’s performance was excellent, though I imagine it could be difficult to tell who’s speaking due to similar male voices. But that’s no matter, he read the book well and with much enthusiasm and humor. Well done, sir!

  • The Age of Reason Begins

  • A History of European Civilization in the Period of Shakespeare, Bacon, Montaigne, Rembrandt, Galileo, and Descartes: 1558 - 1648: The Story of Civilization, Book 7
  • By: Will Durant, Ariel Durant
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 34 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 261
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 230
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 228

The Age of Reason Begins brings together a fascinating network of stories in the discussion of the bumpy road toward the Enlightenment. This is the age of great monarchs and greater artists - on the one hand, Elizabeth I of England, Philip II of Spain, and Henry IV of France; on the other, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Montaigne, and Rembrandt. It also encompasses the heyday of Francis Bacon, Galileo, Giordano Bruno, and Descartes, the fathers of modern science and philosophy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mostly 30 Years of War, but Reason bests War

  • By Michael on 05-01-15

Seventh Gem in a Priceless Series

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

Will and Ariel Durant were excellent researchers and historians. I’m amazed at how, in the seventh volume of this series, the care and detail given to this work has not changed from its first book. They covered a lot over this specific 90 year period but, to be sure, they could’ve gone into much greater detail as their knowledge was so great.

It’s interesting that this is the first book in the series to have Ariel Durant as co-author. Having read the previous volumes, it’s obvious that she was involved in their production, but I believe she added her own flair to this volume in the way a question would be asked before further investigation, or the announcement of a pause for deeper study would sometimes take place. To my recollection this didn’t happen in earlier volumes (my memory stinks, though, so I may be wrong).

The look into great works of art is always fascinating and nearly every time a piece of work was mentioned, I looked it up on my laptop if it was not pictured inside because the description of monumental paintings is fantastic, making it necessary to see the work that has just been glorified. The same goes for the praised authors. There’s now a list of more books that I’ll eventually purchase because of their influence.

In middle and later chapters, the story of religion’s evolution into various sects (Catholicism, Protestantism, Calvinism, Islam, and the like) are very intense as they politically shaped the world as they do today but in more extreme measures. There was no separation of church and state, so crowns were continuously renounced because of the suspected beliefs of the king or queen, even of family members.

In the final chapters, geometry and physics wage war on religion as the Earth is not the center of the universe, or we do not orbit the sun in a perfect circle. Philosophy evolves because of these understandings and begins to turn from faith.

There’s so much in this book that the review could be pages-long but I’ll end on the notion that Grover Gardner is an excellent narrator. All words are pronounced with such eloquence that it is hard to find a match to his quality. The only thing I didn’t like about this reading was that only two footnotes were read - they were the english translations of poems. Aside from that, a brilliant audiobook that is sure to entertain and educate!

  • Complete Short Stories, Volume 3

  • By: W. Somerset Maugham
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 27 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61

In 1938 Maugham wrote, "Fact and fiction are so intermingled in my work that now, looking back on it, I can hardly distinguish one from the other." Maugham also wrote that most of his short stories were inspired by accounts he heard firsthand during his travels to the lonely outposts of the British Empire. In volume three of this series, we present all of the remaining short stories which Maugham published after World War I and which he subsequently caused to be republished in various collections.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Complete list of Short Stories

  • By Julieta de los espíritus on 03-11-17

Brilliant Performances of Wonderful Short Stories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-18

William Somerset Maugham’s short stories are all so beautifully detailed that it is easy to imagine yourself in the midst of them. The majority of the stories in this volume are short (between three to seven pages) and, strange enough, some of them had characters from previous stories going off on their own tangents.

The greatest aspect of this audiobook, though, is Charlton Griffin’s performance. Each character, whether male or female, has a unique voice in the story so that there’s no confusion as to who is speaking. Mr Griffin did a fantastic job of getting into each character and playing them as if he was on a stage. He certainly deserve praise for his talent and use of it!