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canuckles

Toronto
  • 5
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 5
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  • All the King's Men

  • By: Robert Penn Warren
  • Narrated by: Michael Emerson
  • Length: 20 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,631
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,178
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,173

The fictionalized account of Louisiana's colorful and notorious governor, Huey Pierce Long, All the King's Men follows the startling rise and fall of Willie Stark, a country lawyer in the Deep South of the 1930s. Beset by political enemies, Stark seeks aid from his right-hand man Jack Burden, who will bear witness to the cataclysmic unfolding of this very American tragedy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully presented

  • By Cheimon on 10-12-08

Many astonishing passages

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-21-18

A consummate portrait of a demagogue. The political insights remain chilling (and completely relevant) almost 70 years later. Some of the fictional devices are creaky, and the last quarter of the book a letdown, but still a fascinating listen. Michael Emerson’s narration is superb.

  • Psmith Journalist

  • By: P. G. Wodehouse
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Cecil
  • Length: 5 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 135
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99

Meet Psmith, with a silent 'P' as in psychic. A gallant, charming individual, Psmith has a gift for getting into awful scrapes, and when he takes over a gentile journal known as Cosy Moments with the aid of Billy Windsor, its sub-editor, he turns it into a radical publication...with alarming and hilarious results.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Very bad sound quality

  • By Hilary on 08-14-11

Well it is 100 years old

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-17

There are many great lines here, and the comic tension between artist Psmith and the New York works pretty well. I wish the racism had been excised (easy to do). The least of the dozen or so Wodehouse works I've listened to or read. For fans only.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Lincoln in the Bardo

  • A Novel
  • By: George Saunders
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman, David Sedaris, George Saunders, and others
  • Length: 7 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,774
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,288
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7,248

The long-awaited first novel from the author of Tenth of December: a moving and original father-son story featuring none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented. February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln's beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A Mixed Bag

  • By Thomas More on 02-24-17

Really works as a play

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-17

I had the book and had trouble getting into it. Saunders apparently started this as a play, and for me that's how it works better. The panoply of voices convincingly creates an afterworld and its dozens of characters. I did need to refer back to the book to keep track of some of the characters, but overall the production is outstanding.

  • A Brief History of Seven Killings

  • By: Marlon James
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean, Cherise Boothe, Dwight Bacquie, and others
  • Length: 26 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,794
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,666
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,658

Winner, The Man Booker Prize, 2015 Deftly spanning decades and continents and peopled with a wide range of characters - assassins, journalists, drug dealers, and even ghosts - A Brief History of Seven Killings is the fictional exploration of that dangerous and unstable time and its bloody aftermath, from the streets and slums of Kingston in the 1970s, to the crack wars in 1980s New York, to a radically altered Jamaica in the 1990s.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Just Brilliant!

  • By Philip on 01-30-16

Masterpiece

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-17

One of the best audiobooks I've ever heard. The symphony of voices is a great dramatic accomplishment - an aural equivalent of The Wire, if you will. I needed the book to help me get attuned to the different characters at first, but it was enthralling after that. I have high hopes for the upcoming TV miniseries, but it will be difficult to match the dynamics of this spoken-word masterpiece.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A Gentleman in Moscow

  • A Novel
  • By: Amor Towles
  • Narrated by: Nicholas Guy Smith
  • Length: 17 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,618
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 21,893
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,813

A Gentleman in Moscow immerses us in an elegantly drawn era with the story of Count Alexander Rostov. When, in 1922, he is deemed an unrepentant aristocrat by a Bolshevik tribunal, the count is sentenced to house arrest in the Metropol, a grand hotel across the street from the Kremlin. Rostov, an indomitable man of erudition and wit, has never worked a day in his life and must now live in an attic room while some of the most tumultuous decades in Russian history are unfolding outside the hotel's doors.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Reprieve Amidst Ugly News, Relentless Negativity

  • By Cathy Lindhorst on 08-27-17

Dashingly disappointing; cute, cliched, cloying

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-17

If the alliteration in the headline bugs you, the overuse of alliteration in the text will equally annoy you. It's just one annoying element of a book I found overly cute, self-congratulatory and irrelevant. Towles provides Wodehousisn diction without much of Wodehouse's wit. The set-up is like a sitcom that has run too many seasons. The plummy Jeeves-like narration is a big part of the problem: a Russian accent might have toned down the silliness. And way too long. A waste of 18 hours.