LISTENER

E. Idenmill

San Diego, CA United States
  • 35
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 136
  • ratings
  • A World Undone

  • The Story of the Great War, 1914 to 1918
  • By: G. J. Meyer
  • Narrated by: Robin Sachs
  • Length: 27 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,085
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,857
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,842

The First World War is one of history’s greatest tragedies. In this remarkable and intimate account, author G. J. Meyer draws on exhaustive research to bring to life the story of how the Great War reduced Europe’s mightiest empires to rubble, killed 20 million people, and cracked the foundations of the world we live in today. World War I is unique in the number of questions about it that remain unsettled. After more than 90 years, scholars remain divided on these questions, and it seems likely that they always will.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Overview of the "Overshadowed" War

  • By Andrew on 12-14-12

Was hoping for more

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-19

The book gives a good overview of how the war began. it also has lots of good "background" excerpts and is an excellent survey of the Western front. Its coverage of the Eastern front is more spotty, and it glosses over the fighting outside of Europe. The use of extended quotes from journals and other sources gets a bit tiresome; many of them could have been paired down. The audiobook is hampered by the narrator. He sounds like he has a perpetual head-cold. Furthermore his pronunciation of non-English words sounds like he tries to make everything sound like French. This has the effect of making many uncommon German names difficult to understand and Russian become nearly unintelligible.

  • A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts

  • By: Andrew Chaikin
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 23 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,787
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,593
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,581

Audie Award, History/Biography, 2016. On the night of July 20, 1969, our world changed forever when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. Based on in-depth interviews with 23 of the 24 moon voyagers, as well as those who struggled to get the program moving, A Man on the Moon conveys every aspect of the Apollo missions with breathtaking immediacy and stunning detail.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Long, comforting book on moon exploration

  • By Mark on 06-17-16

Good book, but overly romantic afterword

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-19

Most of this book is great, but it is clear the author is in some ways too in love with his subject. The afterword was so drawn out and overly romantic as to be nearly unlistenable.

  • The Collapsing Empire

  • The Interdependency, Book 1
  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,116
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,246
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,203

Our universe is ruled by physics, and faster-than-light travel is not possible - until the discovery of The Flow, an extradimensional field we can access at certain points in space-time that transports us to other worlds, around other stars. Humanity flows away from Earth, into space, and in time forgets our home world and creates a new empire, the Interdependency, whose ethos requires that no one human outpost can survive without the others. It's a hedge against interstellar war - and a system of control for the rulers of the empire.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I love Scalzi but...

  • By Reece on 04-04-17

An impressive piece of universe building

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-18-18

This is one of the most entertaining and addictive Sci-Fi novels I've read in years. Scalzi brings his characters and their world into vivid and believable life. Wil Wheaton's performance is its perfect complement.

  • The Beginning of Infinity

  • Explanations That Transform the World
  • By: David Deutsch
  • Narrated by: Walter Dixon
  • Length: 20 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 877
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 758
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 742

A bold and all-embracing exploration of the nature and progress of knowledge from one of today's great thinkers. Throughout history, mankind has struggled to understand life's mysteries, from the mundane to the seemingly miraculous. In this important new book, David Deutsch, an award-winning pioneer in the field of quantum computation, argues that explanations have a fundamental place in the universe.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Perspective Shifter

  • By kevmoo on 01-19-14

Great ideas

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-17-18

This book has lots of great ideas - in particular an objective justification for an open and questioning society. The central theme - that humans can achieve limitless knowledge if they are willing to pursue it and live in a dynamic and creative society is a fundamentally optimistic view, and in my opinion, a much-needed antidote to the pessimistic thinking that is rife throughout modern society. That said, I wish it was a bit easier to follow. I still do not see the point of either the chapter-long dialog between Socrates and Hermes nor the extended explanation for quantum physics in the form of a hypothetical science-fiction novel that together serve to bisect this book. Also there are lots of little tangents throughout the book. Overall, they do not fatally compromise this book, however.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Power of Habit

  • Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business
  • By: Charles Duhigg
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 10 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 51,318
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44,398
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44,171

In The Power of Habit, award-winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to the sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Nice! A guide on how to change

  • By Mehra on 04-22-12

A great discussion of what constitutes habits

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-18

This is the kind of "self-help" book I like - it is mostly a description of the concept of the habit based on lengthy examples, both mundane and historically significant. Only the appendix gets into the "self-help" part. I will read / listen to this one again.

  • The Greater Journey

  • Americans in Paris
  • By: David McCullough
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 16 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,359
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,912
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,914

The Greater Journey is the enthralling, inspiring—and until now, untold—story of the adventurous American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, architects, and others of high aspiration who set off for Paris in the years between 1830 and 1900, ambitious to excel in their work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • McCullough takes it to the next level

  • By gregory m loyd on 07-12-11

A bit of a mess of a book.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-18

This book doesn't seem to know what it wants to be. It discusses the influences of Paris on Americans, but seems to divide its focus between science, politics and the arts. It also goes off into long biographical tangents that have little to do with Paris. The epilogue is especially guilty of this - I would have wanted to know if there was a continued tradition of Americans going to Paris after the 19th century. There are some passages of the book that are tortorously drawn out - for example reading passage after passage from Wasburne's diary during the siege of Paris. I skipped to the end of that chapter. Some passages are so over-the-top romantic in tone as to be wretch-worthy. Hermann's narration unfortunately in places emphasizes the worst hyper-dramatic tendencies of the book.

  • The Brothers

  • John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War
  • By: Stephen Kinzer
  • Narrated by: David Cochran Heath
  • Length: 13 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 931
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 845
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 841

John Foster Dulles was secretary of state while his brother, Allen Dulles, was director of the Central Intelligence Agency. In this book, Stephen Kinzer places their extraordinary lives against the backdrop ofAmerican culture and history. He uses the framework of biography to ask: Why does the United States behave as it does in the world?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Cold war and intrigue - who could ask for more

  • By Angela on 10-26-13

A book that makes you think

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-18

This book is great for someone like me who only remembers the very end of the Cold War. it dives into the mindsets of the early part of that conflict as well as the background that allowed that conflict to become all-encompassing (at least from the American point of view). In the process, it explains the viewpoints that held the nation's foreign policy - defining "freedom" in purely economic terms and ignoring civil rights or democracy; "corporate globalism" - a view in which what is good for American-based corporations is good for the world; finally, a binary world view in which everyone who did not share these values was against the United States.

  • Dark Fire

  • A Matthew Shardlake Mystery
  • By: C. J. Sansom
  • Narrated by: Steven Crossley
  • Length: 18 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,231
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 996
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 995

Winner of the CWA Ellis Peters Historical Dagger Award, Dark Fire revisits acclaimed master of historical fiction C. J. Sansom's colorful and rapier-witted lawyer, Matthew Shardlake. Set in 1540, this beguiling tale of murder and mayhem is set against a rich backdrop of medieval London. Here, hunchbacked Matthew Shardlake is called upon to investigate the peculiar case of a young woman accused of murder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Murder & Intrigue ~ Lawyers & Psychopaths

  • By Bill on 08-03-12

Addictive book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-01-17

This book is very addictive. It is a great story with memorable characters that brings the listener into London under Henry VIII.

  • The Black Tower

  • By: P. D. James
  • Narrated by: Penelope Dellaporta
  • Length: 13 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 129
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 111
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 111

Just recovered from a grave illness, Commander Adam Dalgliesh is called to the bedside of an elderly priest. When Dalgliesh arrives, Father Baddeley is dead. Is it merely his own brush with mortality that causes Dalgliesh to sense the shadow of death about to fall once more?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Ok..but not great

  • By Jack on 03-05-09

I could not finish it

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-17

This was my last attempt to enjoy a PD James book. I could not finish it. The psychological descriptions of the various characters are at best tedious and at worst, tortuous. None of the characters are people I care about or want to know more about, whether victim, murderer or Dalgliesh himself. Moreover, this is made worse by the narrator. She seems to have two tones - business-like and emotionally unbalanced. I'm removing all of the PD James works from my wish list now.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dissolution

  • A Novel of Tudor England Introducing Matthew Shardlake
  • By: C. J. Sansom
  • Narrated by: Steven Crossley
  • Length: 14 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,719
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,537
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,545

This riveting debut set in 1534 England secured C. J. Sansom’s place “among the most distinguished of modern historical novelists” (P. D. James). When Henry VIII’s emissary is beheaded at an English monastery, hunchbacked lawyer Matthew Shardlake is dispatched to solve the crime. But as he uncovers a cesspool of sin, three more murders occur - and Matthew may be the next target.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Terrific Story, Writing, and Narration ...

  • By Snoodely on 09-13-13

Excellent mystery and historical novel

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-27-17

This is an excellent book, both as a mystery and as an historical novel. the pace is perfect and the ending is surprising. Sansom furthermore makes the 16th century come alive in his narration and makes it feel immediate. I will be listening to other books in this series as well.