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Robert F. Jones

  • 55
  • reviews
  • 228
  • helpful votes
  • 68
  • ratings
  • The Wife Between Us

  • By: Greer Hendricks, Sarah Pekkanen
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,753
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,182
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,134

When you listen to this audiobook, you will make many assumptions. You will assume you are listening to a story about a jealous ex-wife. You will assume she is obsessed with her replacement - a beautiful, younger woman who is about to marry the man they both love. You will assume you know the anatomy of this tangled love triangle. Assume nothing. Twisted and deliciously chilling, The Wife Between Us exposes the secret complexities of an enviable marriage - and the dangerous truths we ignore in the name of love.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • NOT that confusing! Gone Girl + Last Mrs. Parrish

  • By Jenn on 01-11-18

Personal

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

Two stars for the first half, and then deteriorated. Characters not believable(or likable). Situations contrived.

  • Where the Crawdads Sing

  • By: Delia Owens
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 12 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 20,750
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,052
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,973

For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life - until the unthinkable happens.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful

  • By Seattle blues on 08-17-18

Personal 2018.11

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

Growing up poor and alone in the swamp. Nod to biology and art. Southern flavor(grits). Murder mystery with relatively surprising conclusion. Love story in feathers and shells. Loneliness, solitude and finding love. Appealing protagonist.

  • Armada

  • A Novel
  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 11 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34,409
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,289
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 32,225

It's just another day of high school for Zack Lightman. He's daydreaming through another boring math class, with just one more month to go until graduation and freedom - if he can make it that long without getting suspended again. Then he glances out his classroom window and spots the flying saucer.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Lacked the freshness of Ready Player One

  • By Chad on 01-08-16

Personal 2018.11

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

OK - reminiscent of Ender's game. Deus ex machina personal interactions that are too predictable. Twist at the end

  • Atomic Habits

  • Tiny Changes, Remarkable Results
  • By: James Clear
  • Narrated by: James Clear
  • Length: 5 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,756
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,523
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,503

No matter your goals, Atomic Habits offers a proven framework for improving - every day. James Clear, one of the world's leading experts on habit formation, reveals practical strategies that will teach you exactly how to form good habits, break bad ones, and master the tiny behaviors that lead to remarkable results. If you're having trouble changing your habits, the problem isn't you. The problem is your system. Bad habits repeat themselves again and again not because you don't want to change, but because you have the wrong system for change.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The most helpful book I’ve ever read

  • By Adam on 10-26-18

Personal 2018.11

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

Went through twice sequentially - notations the second time. This summarizes the major topics of many of the books I've really enjoyed (Peak, Power of Habit) into a usable form.
Break habits into small parts, and focus on not breaking the chain. Seems so obvious, but it really shines in this format. Examples of both positive(carrot) and negative(stick) ways to apply the principles.
To change a behavior or establish a habit, make it:

1. Obvious
2. Attractive
3. Easy
4. Satisfying

Don't set goals, focus on habits that you want to incorporate.
Survivor bias - everyone who wins a gold medal has it as a goal, but so do all of the other competitors who didn't win. Every day you don't achieve the goal is a bit of a failure. Not so if the goal is the good habit itself.
So - instead of losing weight, focus on the habit of not eating between meals, and then on meal composition. I'm the kind of guy who doesn't snack. I'm the kind of guy who eats healthy. The weight will happen.
In the weight room - if you add only 1 lb per week, that's 52 lbs in a year. That certainly seems doable. Focus on the tiny habits.
A must read for anyone interested in making long lasting changes.

18 of 18 people found this review helpful

  • Peak

  • Secrets from the New Science of Expertise
  • By: Robert Pool, Anders Ericsson
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 10 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,723
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,397
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,378

Have you ever wanted to learn a language or pick up an instrument, only to become too daunted by the task at hand? Expert performance guru Anders Ericsson has made a career of studying chess champions, violin virtuosos, star athletes, and memory mavens. Peak condenses three decades of original research to introduce an incredibly powerful approach to learning that is fundamentally different from the way people traditionally think about acquiring a skill.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Offers more wisdom than even intended

  • By Tristan on 07-10-16

2018.10 Personal

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

Third time through - Audio notes
Life-changing if you let it be. Excellent writing by the expert in the field. Peak performance only comes with many hours of deliberate practice. There are no prodigies - everyone has to put in the time. The brain is much more plastic than previously thought, even for old people like me. The definition of deliberate practice. Why Gladwell's summary is wrong. Pushing just beyond the comfort level on a consistent basis. Much information about medical practice, and the difference between Surgeons and non-procedural physicians.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

  • A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life
  • By: Mark Manson
  • Narrated by: Roger Wayne
  • Length: 5 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98,827
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86,681
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86,199

For decades we've been told that positive thinking is the key to a happy, rich life. "F*ck positivity," Mark Manson says. "Let's be honest, shit is f*cked, and we have to live with it." In his wildly popular Internet blog, Manson doesn't sugarcoat or equivocate. He tells it like it is - a dose of raw, refreshing, honest truth that is sorely lacking today. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck is his antidote to the coddling, let's-all-feel-good mind-set that has infected modern society and spoiled a generation, rewarding them with gold medals just for showing up.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A book for 20-somethings, but not me

  • By Bonny on 09-22-16

Personal

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-14-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

second read 2018.10

Entertaining. Pretty basic stuff. Don't mind what other people think. He's completely honest with his wife - tells her if he doesn't like what she is wearing. It's not what happens to you, but what you do with it. Not caring sometimes lets things happen, but he doesn't reveal when it is important to care and when to stop.
Contemplation of death is important for living a good life.
Most of what we do with our lives is immortality projects, and that's what gets people into trouble.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • On the Nature of Things

  • By: Lucretius
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 9 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 226
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 174

This famous work by Lucretius is a masterpiece of didactic poetry, and it still stands today as the finest exposition of Epicurean philosophy ever written. The poem was produced in the middle of first century B.C., a period that was to witness a flowering of Latin literature unequaled for beauty and intellectual power in subsequent ages. The Latin title, De Rerum Natura, translates literally to On the Nature of Things and is meant to impress the reader with the breadth and depth of Epicurean philosophy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Masterpiece

  • By Lawrence on 11-23-08

2018.10 Personal

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

So I'm a Philistine.
I was really looking forward to this book, considered a classic and a work of genius.
Lucretius is given credit for the promulgation of the concept (by the Greeks) that the universe is composed of atoms - indivisible particles are inherent in the nature of reality. But the atoms that he describes are in no way akin to the concepts that we know today. He describes the nature of the macroscopic world based on the same characteristics of the atomic world (smooth materials are composed of smooth atoms).
This book is one person's conjecture about the structure and nature of reality. It is based on his assumptions, not scientific facts as we know them. And this is perhaps the lesson of the book. I think that my understanding of things is based on observable and reproducible experiments. I don't think that things are a certain way just because someone says so.
I thought I'd at least get some insight into human nature, but this was lacking as well. I guess it is a good window into how people thought at his time.
The narrator's voice and style made me think of Peterman on Seinfeld.
I had to force myself to finish it

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Team of Rivals

  • The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
  • By: Doris Kearns Goodwin
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Toren
  • Length: 41 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,240
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,532
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,555

On May 18, 1860, William H. Seward, Salmon P. Chase, Edward Bates, and Abraham Lincoln waited in their hometowns for the results from the Republican National Convention in Chicago. When Lincoln emerged as the victor, his rivals were dismayed and angry. Throughout the turbulent 1850s, each had energetically sought the presidency as the conflict over slavery was leading inexorably to secession and civil war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful, Heartbreaking, and Informative

  • By JJ on 09-10-12

Personal

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

Read it for the first time when it originally came out about 20 years ago. Listened this time. Remarkable in its detail. Get a sense for Lincoln as a person. He seemed to live the 'with malice toward none' credo. Amazing how he could make dear friends out of enemies, likely because of his personal qualities and honesty. A big takeaway - he would sit and listen, just listen to people with different opinions, and then draw his own conclusions. I don't get the sense that there was debate, but that he really tried to consider their perspective. This ability to really give persons with an opposing point of view his attention seems to be one of the hallmarks of his greatness, and perhaps it is why even people who disagreed with him seemed to love him. Also amazing that people in his own time, even rivals considered him to be a man for the ages.
Also of note - he obviously felt deeply. He was moved to despair with the suffering that the war caused, but realized that he must buoy himself and his country with a sense of humor.

  • The Moral Landscape

  • How Science Can Determine Human Values
  • By: Sam Harris
  • Narrated by: Sam Harris
  • Length: 6 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,036
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,430
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,389

In this explosive new book, Sam Harris tears down the wall between scientific facts and human values, arguing that most people are simply mistaken about the relationship between morality and the rest of human knowledge. Harris urges us to think about morality in terms of human and animal well-being, viewing the experiences of conscious creatures as peaks and valleys on a "moral landscape".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Read it

  • By Paul on 11-23-10

Personal

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

Excellent. Makes the compelling argument that there is a definable standard for good and evil, right and wrong. Clear and concise. Moral Absolutism. Spirituality without God. Just because we cannot answer a question does not mean that there is no answer.

Second listen - 2018.10.01

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Defending Jacob

  • A Novel
  • By: William Landay
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 12 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9,193
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,120
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,117

Andy Barber has been an assistant district attorney in his suburban Massachusetts county for more than 20 years. He is respected in his community, tenacious in the courtroom, and happy at home with his wife, Laurie, and son, Jacob. But when a shocking crime shatters their New England town, Andy is blindsided by what happens next: his 14-year-old son is charged with the murder of a fellow student.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Terrific!

  • By cristina on 03-12-12

Personal

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-23-18

Two stars - meh
three stars - good
four stars - worth a second read
five stars - life-changing - my top 50 of all time

Worth the read...surprising. The secrets we all have. What happens to us when we are confronted with impossibly challenging situations. How much do we believe and have faith in our children. How much do we protect them?