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Tara

Washington, USA
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 13
  • helpful votes
  • 191
  • ratings
  • The Last Girl

  • The Dominion Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: Joe Hart
  • Narrated by: Dara Rosenberg
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,246
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,974
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,969

A mysterious worldwide epidemic reduces the birthrate of female infants from 50 percent to less than one percent. Medical science and governments around the world scramble in an effort to solve the problem, but 25 years later there is no cure, and an entire generation grows up with a population of fewer than 1000 women. Zoey and some of the surviving young women are housed in a scientific research compound dedicated to determining the cause.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Gripping story, but missing some details

  • By Ruth Ravve on 06-14-16

very interesting story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-18

I really enjoyed the plot. There are a variety of characters. I wasn't particularly pleased with the style of narration. The voice was a little too soft and high pitched and an annoying pronunciation of the word "forward"; Possible over usage of the word or that impression could have been created by my pet peeve. I am interested in the container to on of the story.

  • Cop Town

  • By: Karin Slaughter
  • Narrated by: Kathleen Early
  • Length: 14 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,209
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,834
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,844

Atlanta, 1974: It's Kate Murphy's first day on the job, and the Atlanta Police Department is seething after the murder of an officer. Before the day has barely begun, she already suspects she's not cut out to be a cop. Her male uniform is too big, she can't handle a gun, and she's rapidly learning that the APD is hardly a place that welcomes women. Worse still, in the ensuing manhunt she'll be partnered with Maggie Lawson, a cop with her own ax to grind.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding, Gutsy Crime Novel Read by a Master

  • By Charles Atkinson on 07-08-14

Good, solid, entertainment read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-17

The writing style started out a little flowery but became stable quickly. Excellent audio performance. Solid story that will keep you engaged and on your toes.

  • Greyhound

  • By: Steffan Piper
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 8 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,406
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,237
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,239

Sebastien Ranes’s single mom and her feckless boyfriend can’t be bothered to take care of a stuttering 12-year-old. Banished to live with his grandmother on the far side of the country, the boy can barely understand a bus schedule when he gets dumped at the Greyhound station in Stockton, California. Given $35 and a one-way ticket to Altoona, Pennsylvania, Sebastien must cross the country - alone, without a clue how to fend for himself. Filled with youthful anger and naïveté, Sebastien heads out into the "Morning in America" of Ronald Reagan’s 1980s.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Warm Story of Fragility and Friendship

  • By Gillian on 06-29-16

Great story, great read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-17

It was a great read with a very unique story, from the point of view of a 12-year-old boy. Written in a tone true to the main character, my only complaint is the overuse of the word "rejoin". The performance was stellar, with a narrator well-versed in vivid character portrayal. I highly enjoyed this listen and powered through it in two days.

  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • By: Douglas Adams
  • Narrated by: Stephen Fry
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,732
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 28,827
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,826

Seconds before the Earth is demolished to make way for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is plucked off the planet by his friend Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised edition of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy who, for the last 15 years, has been posing as an out-of-work actor.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fun nonsense

  • By Randall on 04-25-09

Great book - fabulous narration!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-16-14

What did you love best about The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy?

Where I would have thoroughly enjoyed this book if I sat down and read it, the narration of this text really made it hit home. My ten year old would never have been able to follow and appreciate the story if she had sat down and read it herself, but listening to it with me (minus the few translations of British terms I had to make for her :) ) in the car she was able to follow 100% the story and even the jokes that would usually be well lost on her, simply because of the fabulous, riveting, and hilarious narration

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy?

Everyone pulls some basic phrases out of this book that are referenced to fellow readers like "the answer to the universe" etc. But the phrase the my step-daughter and I walked away with beyond all else came from the beginning in two simple words "Yellow... Bulldozer". Absolutely hilarious humor that would have been nearly lost without such a great performance.

What does Stephen Fry bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Beautiful, dry, British humor in it's most classic and elegant sense.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Absolutely! Unfortunately I work full time so I think it took me a whole three days to finish it. The first time. I've since listened to it again, that second listen only taking two days instead of three.

Any additional comments?

A great read for sci-fi fans everywhere! If you've got a little nerd in you, you will love this book.

  • 47 Ronin

  • By: John Allyn, Stephen Turnbull (foreword)
  • Narrated by: David Shih
  • Length: 7 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 500
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 440
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 445

For those looking for the real story behind the fictionalized movie account of the 47 Ronin story, this is the definitive, fascinating account of this unforgettable tale of a band of samurai who defied the Emperor to avenge the disgrace and death of their master, and faced certain death as a result. It led to one of the bloodiest episodes in Japanese history, and in the process, created a new set of heroes in Japan.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Neither fish nor....

  • By David on 11-05-14

Poorly written - could have been an excellent tale

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-16-14

I was not thrilled with the style of this book, was very text-book and lecture like rather than a story. This is an excellent tale and had/has so much room dramatization and riveting turns and twists of plot. And yet, the listen, though the narrator was quite good and did what he could with the text, was quite dry and uninteresting. Even though it wasn't very long I found myself having to "forge ahead" and "make" myself finish the story. It felt like sitting in a room listening to a news report the seemed like it would never end. Disappointing, could have been much better.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Necessary Lies

  • By: Diane Chamberlain
  • Narrated by: Alison Elliott
  • Length: 10 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,783
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,562
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,559

Best-selling author Diane Chamberlain delivers a breakout book about a small southern town 50 years ago, and the darkest - and most hopeful - places in the human heart. After losing her parents, 15-year-old Ivy Hart is left to care for her grandmother, older sister, and nephew as tenants on a small tobacco farm. As she struggles with her grandmother’s aging, her sister’s mental illness, and her own epilepsy, she realizes they might need more than she can give. When Jane Forrester takes a position as Grace County’s newest social worker, she doesn’t realize just how much her help is needed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Controversial story - great performance

  • By Marie on 05-26-15

Excellent story, historically accurate

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-14

My first introduction to American eugenics programs was through Jodi Picoult's book Second Glance. I was deeply moved by the subject, but have rarely run across it since until [book:Necessary Lies|17286747]. The story was gripping and well balanced by the characters maintaining an accurate world view for the time period (1960's), the author clearly being cautious not to modernize the characters' outlook on life and the world around them, ensuring that they were influenced by an accurately depicted 1960's society. The story is absolutely riveting, equally heart-wrenching and heart-warming, and the characters each completely unique, entirely genuine, and full of color. I highly recommend this work for anyone interested in eugenics, historical fiction, or even anyone who just thrives on an excellently told story.

The performance was also incredibly wonderful.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Fearless

  • The Undaunted Courage and Ultimate Sacrifice of Navy SEAL Team SIX Operator Adam Brown
  • By: Eric Blehm
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,100
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,784
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 3,793

When Navy SEAL Adam Brown woke up on March 17, 2010, he didn’t know he would die that night in the Hindu Kush Mountains of Afghanistan - but he was ready: In a letter to his children, not meant to be seen unless the worst happened, he wrote, "I’m not afraid of anything that might happen to me on this earth, because I know no matter what, nothing can take my spirit from me."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • These heros and their families give so much

  • By Susan on 08-13-12

To know the SEAL you must know the MAN.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-14

Introduction
I am an avid audio books listener (Audible) and always keep a full library of books queued up to listen to so I can move right from one to the next. I purchased Fearless back in November of last year (11/12/2013). I don't usually migrate toward military themed books, this is the first I've read in years and I couldn't even tell you what the last one was. But when I saw this one, I felt a pull and knew that it was something that, even though I didn't really want to read it, I knew that I should. Like most books I purchase for this reason, I avoided it, never feeling like I was "in the mood" to start it up. Boy was I mistaken.

The Beginning
The first thing I noticed was that the book I was beginning had been produced by Christian Audio. I am spiritual myself, but having grown up with the "language", the phrases that much of the Christian community use left and right so much that they have lost their meaning ("saved", "moved to...", "voice of God", etc. etc.), I usually steer clear from clearly Christian material, feeling that much of the intent is lost in translation. While the book itself is not a "religious" one, the story certainly is. Never the less, I had the book and I was damn well going to read it.

From the first sentences, I was pulled into the story. Because it was so fascinating? No. Because it started with a very clearly stated purpose - to understand the SEAL, you must first understand the man. You can't know how far someone has risen until you know how far they have first fallen. The story was not one of a Navy SEAL. It was the story of Adam Brown - the man.

The Story
What the story did, the way it was constructed, was pull you in. It made you feel like you knew Adam, his friends, his family, his town. The story was put together so as to make you feel like you were intimately a part of Adam's life, loved him like family, and appreciated his humanity. The writing, the story telling, was like you were sitting in a room with the people who knew him best and they were literally telling you about him and his life, from their unique perspectives. When you meet someone new, you form an idea of who they are in your head. Then as you hear things about them or stories about them from other people, that view begins to shift, and that is what this story feels like.

The Middle
The middle of the story, the transition from broken man to Navy SEAL, was by far my favorite part. Seeing someone so normal, so real, overcome extreme personal odds in order to succeed at the highest caliber one can. You admire his strength, his humility, his incredible tenderness, and moreover - his balance between SEAL and Husband & Father. It finds a piece of your soul and makes it say, "Hey, I could be something that matters too".

The End
You weren't left at the end with a generic "no one will ever truly know the number of lives that were touched" sort of an ending. You were left with quantifiable evidence in the way this man, just by living his life and always striving to be better, touched the lives of everyone he met. Including your own.

Something I may have gotten that those who sit down and read the hard copy book may not have, was an interview with the author at the end. I usually listen to these when they are included, but sort of suffer through them since they all pretty much sound the same. I can't imagine this book being complete without that interview. I can't say much about it for fear that it would give away, what I feel, are some significant parts to the story. But I feel that interview really completed the work with proper closure.

Overall
I have read a lot of books. I've read a lot of good books. I haven't read many great books. This was by far the most incredible story. The story of a real man, with the most human and debilitating of flaws, who not only never let life get him down - but LIVED every second of his to the fullest, never missing out on anything.

This story will make you want to do belly-flops off the high dive. Six times in a row.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Water for Elephants

  • By: Sara Gruen
  • Narrated by: David LeDoux, John Randolph Jones
  • Length: 11 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,375
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,221
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,305

Why we think it’s a great listen: Some books are meant to be read; others are meant to be heard – Water for Elephants falls into the second group, and is one of the best examples we have of how a powerful performance enhances a great story. Nonagenarian Jacob Jankowski reflects back on his wild and wondrous days with a circus. It's the Depression Era and Jacob, finding himself parentless and penniless, joins the Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show on Earth.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Rosie the bull elephant?

  • By Randall on 07-22-07

Fantastic read, wonderful performance!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-14

Would you listen to Water for Elephants again? Why?

Absolutely and I'm sure I will. Having seen the movie first, I was hesitant in my approach to the book. The theme is so visual and colorful I wasn't quite sure if maybe some of that vibrancy would be lost in the story-telling. But my concerns were quickly put to rest. The writing is bright and colorful and vibrant - far outshining the movie.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Water for Elephants?

One of the most memorable moments was certainly when the main character leaves his train car for a period of time and returns to find that his friends have been "red lighted", tossed from the moving train over a trestle.

However, the MOST memorable moments, and the telling of it, was when Rosie dispatched with her tormentor August in such a calm and collected manner. Clearly she knew it was wrong, but approached the much-needed task with the same methodical attitude as when taking her stake out of the ground, thieving the lemonade, and returning to her spot and replacing her stake as if nothing had ever happened.

Which character – as performed by David LeDoux and John Randolph Jones – was your favorite?

Both performances were incredible. The performance of Young Jacob was vibrant, full of youth and honesty.

The performance of Jacob at 90 (or 93) was spectacular, conveying the heart of an old man forgotten, who's mind, though not as sharp as it once was, is still keen and present. The narrator conveys pain and joy with an equal amount of heart, in ways that really reach out and touch your soul.

If you could take any character from Water for Elephants out to dinner, who would it be and why?

Rosie! Could you imagine me sitting down at the table with an elephant with an attitude?

OR

Walter. A very unique character, who had gone through so much and became so guarded, but had so much hidden knowledge and spirit.

0 of 4 people found this review helpful