LISTENER

withherownwings

Madison, WI, United States
  • 158
  • reviews
  • 541
  • helpful votes
  • 269
  • ratings
  • Twain’s Feast

  • By: Audible Originals
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman
  • Length: 4 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,208
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,043
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,030

Mark Twain, beloved American writer, performer, and humorist, was a self-proclaimed glutton. With the help of a chef and some friends, Nick Offerman presents the story of Twain’s life through the lens of eight of Mark Twain’s favorite foods.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Feast for the Ears!

  • By Ellen H. on 11-01-18

Perfect narrator, history lovingly investigated

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-18

Nick Offerman is the perfect narrator for this production (which is an excerpt from a book "Twain's Feast: Searching for America's Lost Foods in the Footsteps of Samuel Clemens" by Andrew Beahrs), lovingly exploring the historical and geographical background and meaning behind a list of Samuel Clemens' favorite foods for a feast. The author gives great insight into the food items or animals, how they were then and how that items exists (or doesn't) now. They explore how things were sourced, prepared, what they represented, what nostalgia Clemens would have had for those items, etc - it's not just a recipe book. Only a few menu items are explored in this book, and I'd love to read the full book. This is great for American History fans, regardless of whether or not you are a particular fan of Mark Twain. This is a cosy listen, with reporters visiting locations and interviewing experts in the area about their recollections and experience with these ingredients and social groups that the item is important to. It's not pretentious. The stories are immediate, personal, informative, and often hilarious. #AmericanHistory #Food #Tagsgiving #Sweepstakes

  • The Lady of the Rivers

  • By: Philippa Gregory
  • Narrated by: Bianca Amato
  • Length: 19 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,538
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,195
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,188

Jacquetta always has had the gift of second sight. As a child visiting her uncle, she met his prisoner, Joan of Arc, and saw her own power reflected in the young woman accused of witchcraft. They share the mystery of the tarot card of the wheel of fortune before Joan is taken to a horrific death. Jacquetta understands the danger for a woman who dares to dream. Jacquetta is married to the Duke of Bedford, English regent of France, and he introduces her to a mysterious world of learning and alchemy.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Philippa back on track

  • By Bonnie-Ann on 11-26-11

Great historical fiction pre-Tudor era

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-18

One of the best of the Philippa Gregory novels that I've read. Completely spellbinding. Believable female characters, especially strong Jacquetta (so trapped in the court system) and I felt transported into the 1400's. It was great to read a "prequel" to the Tudor history that I know well. It was also a lovely romance, and I kept thinking: Why couldn't the Outlander series be this good?! Bianca Amaro's narration is superb.

  • The Book of the Unnamed Midwife

  • The Road to Nowhere, Book 1
  • By: Meg Elison
  • Narrated by: Angela Dawe
  • Length: 9 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,879
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,742
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,748

When she fell asleep, the world was doomed. When she awoke, it was dead. In the wake of a fever that decimated the earth's population - killing women and children and making childbirth deadly for the mother and infant - the midwife must pick her way through the bones of the world she once knew to find her place in this dangerous new one. Gone are the pillars of civilization. All that remains is power - and the strong who possess it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • "Equals" = "Annoying"

  • By Lulu on 12-26-16

Feminist stark post-apocalyptic gem

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-18

A dark dystopian story in which a fever kills off most women and children and makes childbirth something that both mother and child are unlikely to survive. Our heroine is a midwife/nurse that manages to survive the sickness and then fights to live in a world of mostly men, reduced to desperation and their base instincts. She disguises herself as a man and tries to avoid contact with other people as much as she can. She is tough and resourceful, taciturn and resolute. The interactions with the few that she either cannot avoid or cannot resist protecting are very telling, and sometimes lend some lovely warmth to the bleak story. The writing is absolutely beautiful, and the world is realistically harsh (two things that don't always follow in post-apocalyptic fiction), which makes the book stronger and very engrossing. This is not a soft, sweet book, but it's one with a ton of heart and it stuck with me for a long time. It's in my top ten of the genre that I have read. The narration is pot on for the character.

If you liked this book, seek out The Only Ones by Carola Dibbell, The Dog Stars by Peter Heller, and Orleans by Sherri Smith.

  • The Art of Asking

  • How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help
  • By: Amanda Palmer, Brené Brown (foreword)
  • Narrated by: Amanda Palmer
  • Length: 11 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,741
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,545
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,535

In The Art of Asking, Palmer expands upon her popular TED talk to reveal how ordinary people, those of us without thousands of Twitter followers and adoring fans, can use her principles in our own lives to "let people help".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love the book. Palmer reads and sings here!

  • By Matthew on 12-01-14

incredibly vulnerable, positive memoir

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-18

You don't have to be a fan of Amanda Palmer to enjoy this book. She is incredibly open, honest, flawed, sincere, and humble. She talks about her fears, hopes, history, and dreams. You hear stories that are of absolute vulnerability - with lovers including her husband Neil Gaiman, her mother, her best friend Anthony, with her fans. The Kickstarter campaign story is covered but her story is more than that. The forward to the book is by Brene Brown, which shows that Amanda has really done her research into vulnerability, shame, guilt, trust, and thoughtful examinations of emotional human interaction. The book is beautifully and smoothly written - she clearly re-wrote and edited, taking good editorial advice from Neil. This doesn't seem amateurish. Her narration is sincere and nuanced, cleanly edited, and emotional but never maudlin. You'll finish the book and feel like you are Amanda's confidante and friend. It is an honor to hear this book.

  • Borderline

  • The Arcadia Project, Book 1
  • By: Mishell Baker
  • Narrated by: Arden Hammersmith
  • Length: 11 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 218
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 208
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 207

A year ago Millie lost her legs and her filmmaking career in a failed suicide attempt. Just when she's sure the credits have rolled on her life story, she gets a second chance with the Arcadia Project: a secret organization that polices the traffic to and from a parallel reality filled with creatures straight out of myth and fairy tales. For her first assignment, Millie is tasked with tracking down a missing movie star who also happens to be a nobleman of the Seelie Court.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It's the characters

  • By Ken Schneyer on 02-11-17

diverse, smart YA UF

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-18

What a treat of a book. While it follows the basic tropes of YA urban fantasy (female protagonist gets inducted into a reality that includes magic that she wasn't aware of, joins a group of characters that seem disjointed at first, they bond, end up blowing open the situation to expose it has much bigger implications than it appeared on the surface, and then have to fight the Big Bad despite overwhelming odds), but this book had characteristics that elevated it above the pack. The protagonist is bisexual, and there are gay characters. Millie is disabled, having lost her legs in a suicide attempt; and while the details of the prosthetic legs and wheelchair use are detailed in a frank manner, it's not a play for pity. Millie also has Borderline Personality Disorder, and that condition is explored in detail, informing her actions, prejudices, and emotional reactions. There are lots of racial tensions in this book: between black/white and fae highborn/commoners, Seelie/Unseelie courts. This book and its world is intriguing, gritty, and yet hopeful. It's a story with a lot of underdogs and personal struggle. It's the most "human" urban fantasy story I've read.

The magic system is well explained and believable, with enough limitations and rules that it never seems too over the top powerful. I also loved the idea of the "echoes" - where a human and a fae have counterpart pairs, that when allowed to meet and interact inspires the human much like a muse, creating great art or incredible scientific discovery and the faerie to focus their thoughts and become more effective in practical matters. It's a lovely idea of symbiotic partnership and allows the author to explore the intricacies of that kind of intimacy and potential loss that the situation produces. The plotline is engaging and the pacing is great, moving from quiet moments to moments of big action as our flawed heroes race to figure out an answer to the problem and restore some kind of balance between the worlds. The answers aren't pretty and nothing comes without sacrifice. The audiobook is ably narrated by Arden Hammersmith, whose slightly rough voice works great for Millie's practical and yet incredibly nuanced emotional fragility. She handles the different characters and accents with aplomb.

  • Time and Again

  • By: Jack Finney
  • Narrated by: Paul Hecht
  • Length: 17 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,383
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,218
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,215

Transported from the mid-twentieth century to New York City in the year 1882, Si Morley walks the fashionable "Ladies' Mile" of Broadway, is enchanted by the jingling sleigh bells in Central Park, and solves a 20th-century mystery by discovering its 19th-century roots. Falling in love with a beautiful young woman, he ultimately finds himself forced to choose between his lives in the present and the past. A story that will remain in the listener's memory, Time and Again is a remarkable blending of the troubled present and a nostalgic past....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best time travel novel; my very favorite audiobook

  • By Mark on 04-08-12

lovely historical New York time jump adventure

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-18

I picked this up due to Stephen King noting its influence on his 11/22/63 book, and it did not disappoint. It's a solid time travel story, playing with the time travel concept and offering a lot of enjoyable in-depth history of New York City. Si Morley, our protagonist, is recruited from his advertising artist job in the 1930's and sent back to New York of 1882. There's a family secret to unravel, and the mystery kept me guessing all the way through. A very enjoyable story, with just a touch of romance, and featuring a harrowing building fire in the 1880's. It's charming without being sugar-coated. It feels a bit like a graphic novel or a movie with very descriptive details that made the story feel vivid.

  • Will Save the Galaxy for Food

  • By: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Narrated by: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,704
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,408
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,393

Space travel just isn't what it used to be. With the invention of Quantum Teleportation, space heroes aren't needed anymore. When one particularly unlucky ex-adventurer masquerades as famous pilot and hate figure Jacques McKeown, he's sucked into an ever-deepening corporate and political intrigue. Between space pirates, adorable deadly creatures, and a missing fortune in royalties, saving the universe was never this difficult!

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great

  • By K. F. on 03-09-17

madcap humouous sci fi

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

A madcap sci fi romp about the end of old space travel as it is made obsolete by new Quantum Teleportation technology. How do the brave pilots that use to travel the galaxy fighting wrongs find a way to maintain an identify now that they are reduced to history and transporting tourists on nostalgia mini-trips to keep their ships in running order and find new meaning for their lives? Told from the point of view of one particular pilot who gets embroiled in a scheme impersonating an infamous writer of sky pilot tales stolen from the pilots, who has been hired to teach a rich man's spoiled teenage son to fly his new (antiquated) ship as a birthday present. Our anti-hero then has to navigate the waters of angry sky pilots out for revenge, space pirates, mistaken identity, a kidnapping scheme gone horribly pear-shaped and try to keep his good name intact. The writing is funny and snappy and it's a thrill ride to the end. The author reads the book and does a spectular job with the characters and accents. If you are a fan of Firefly or John Scalzi, check this out!

  • Brief Cases

  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters, Jim Butcher, full cast
  • Length: 15 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,967
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,595
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,576

An all-new Dresden Files story headlines this urban fantasy short story collection starring the Windy City's favorite wizard. From the Wild West to the bleachers at Wrigley Field, humans, zombies, incubi, and even fey royalty appear, ready to blur the line between friend and foe. In the never-before-published "Zoo Day", Harry treads new ground as a dad, while fan-favorite characters Molly Carpenter, his onetime apprentice, White Council Warden Anastasia Luccio, and even Bigfoot stalk through the pages of more classic tales.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • James should have read the WHOLE thing

  • By J.A. on 07-30-18

Lots of Maggie, Mouse and Molly!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

It's always great to get a new Dresden Files short story, and this is a great collection of lots of them! I had read the Bigfoot stories already, but the rest were new to me. Lots of Maggie and Mouse (loved "Zoo"), Molly (now I know how she got her Svartelf home!), Harry, and a great Old West tale with Luccio as the star. Lots of gems to help tide us over until Peace Talks arrives.

  • The Collapsing Empire

  • The Interdependency, Book 1
  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,473
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,706
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,666

Our universe is ruled by physics, and faster-than-light travel is not possible - until the discovery of The Flow, an extradimensional field we can access at certain points in space-time that transports us to other worlds, around other stars. Humanity flows away from Earth, into space, and in time forgets our home world and creates a new empire, the Interdependency, whose ethos requires that no one human outpost can survive without the others. It's a hedge against interstellar war - and a system of control for the rulers of the empire.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Definitely not my favorite scalzi

  • By pat on 03-25-17

Fantastic and friendly start to a new sci fi saga

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I'm not a Space Opera fan in general, but Scalzi makes the genre so accessible and enjoyable. This book is the start of new series, and I really think this series has serious legs. The plot content of the book is complex and wide enough for lots of more information to be revealed, and Scalzi gives us great characters in a great world to want to dive deeper into. Ably narrated by Wil Wheaton, the humor is understated and the scientific details and power structures are easily understood. This series has the makings of a sweeping saga, and all the underdog appeal of Firefly.

  • Tin God

  • Delta Crossroads, Book 1
  • By: Stacy Green
  • Narrated by: Johanna Fairview
  • Length: 11 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 165
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 150
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 147

The truth can be as deadly as any weapon. Jaymee Ballard trusted only one person in Roselea, Mississippi with the secret of her lost daughter. When that person is brutally murdered, it leaves her with heartbreak and a slew of unanswered questions. The eerie similarity to a murder of one of Jaymee's close friends years ago causes her to realize her past has come back to haunt her and may cost her own life. Years of deception and abuse leave Jaymee with few options and fewer allies.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I did not expect to like it, but...

  • By Wayne on 08-18-17

small town south Daddy issues

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-18-18

A gritty, atmospheric Southern thriller about a girl who was forced as a teenager to give up her baby in an illegal adoption scheme, and the quest to prove it that leaves a bloody trail of murder. Our protagonist is a likeable, tough young lady living in a trailer park and waitressing at the local diner. She's not too gorgeous or too perfect so as to be easily dismissed, and the cast of characters including her abusive father, religious figures that have far too much influence in the small town, her defeated mother, and the reporter working to help her unravel the mystery of the killer all contribute to the interwoven plot full of surprises. Well-narrated by Johanna Fairview, whose deep rough voice adds a lot of heart and deep weariness to the tale, the book kept my attention to the very end.