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Lanakila

  • 20
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 255
  • ratings
  • If I Run

  • By: Terri Blackstock
  • Narrated by: Nan Gurley
  • Length: 6 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,015
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 903
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 901

Casey Cox's DNA is all over the crime scene. There's no use talking to police; they have failed her abysmally before. She has to flee before she's arrested...or worse. The truth doesn't matter anymore. But what is the truth? That's the question haunting Dylan Roberts, the war-weary veteran hired to find Casey. PTSD has marked him damaged goods, but bringing Casey back can redeem him. Though the crime scene seems to tell the whole story, details of the murder aren't adding up.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Strongly recommend print version NOT AUDIO

  • By Kerri Carter on 05-05-17

Skip the Proselytizing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-18-18

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

The story had great depth and pace. I enjoyed the themes of 'others before self', faith, and doing the right thing that were presented in a manner that didn't whack you over the head. Seeing the choices that both Casey and Dylan made at each turn kept me interested and wanting to hear more.

Any additional comments?

I was horribly disappointed that the author's note at the end of the book went far beyond sharing faith and journey and dove right into proselytizing, political dog whistling, and bigotry. After such a lovely story of caring, faith, and love I was so disappointed that I'm not sure I can listen to the next book from this author.

  • Moloka’i

  • By: Alan Brennert
  • Narrated by: Anne Noelani Miyamoto
  • Length: 17 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,928
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,643
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,638

The powerful debut novel from Alan Brennert, Moloka’i tells the story of Rachel Kalama, a seven-year-old Hawaiian girl who contracts leprosy and is quarantined on the island of Moloka’i during the 1890s. Separated from her family and forced to grow up in the leper colony of Kalaupapa, Rachel experiences intense isolation. But she remains strong, finding moments of joy, and even love. Rich in Hawaiian history, this novel proves itself a stellar piece of historical fiction.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding Book!

  • By David on 08-23-12

Life and Death at a Much Slower Pace

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-17

Who was your favorite character and why?

It would be easy for Rachel to be my favorite character, but I must profess a preference for Sister Catherine. Her calling and her doubt, her love and her loyalty, endear her all the more to me.

Which character – as performed by Anne Noelani Miyamoto – was your favorite?

The narrator did an amazing performance of Rachel's father. She captured his deep and abiding love for his family and his kolohe (rascal) spirit so perfectly in her accent and timing. You can almost see Henry's smile through her narration.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I laughed and wept so many times throughout this reading. As an Island girl myself, the descriptions of life, family, and the islands were so easily recognizable in my own memories. Rachel's astonishment at the reveal of her friends 'secret' was so honest that it tickled me for days.

Any additional comments?

I've read so many poor reviews about the pacing of this story. Readers are best warned that the pacing is reflective of a time when life moved much more slowly. It is not the fault of the story, nor the narrator, that time is spent describing things that are flat-out overlooked in modern life. Take the time to slow down and appreciate the thoughtful observations, and the careful cultivation of the characters and the story.

  • Hidden Figures

  • The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race
  • By: Margot Lee Shetterly
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles
  • Length: 10 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,327
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,662
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,692

Before John Glenn orbited the Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as "human computers" used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets and astronauts into space. Among these problem solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Black Herstory

  • By Morgana on 10-09-16

The story gets lost in the details

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-17

Would you try another book from Margot Lee Shetterly and/or Robin Miles?

I likely will not read another of Ms. Shetterly's books until she has a few more under her name. This one was clunky, and the intention of an inspiring story was lost in the overabundance of details. Yes, I want to know the context of the happenings. No, I do not need to know every little detail about NACA.

Would you be willing to try another one of Robin Miles’s performances?

Many of the reviews of Ms. Miles' performance complain about her computer-like speech pattern, but I found her diction to be very clean and pleasant. I certainly wouldn't discount 'reading' another of her narrations.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl in the Spider's Web

  • A Lisbeth Salander Novel, Continuing Stieg Larsson's Millennium Series
  • By: David Lagercrantz
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 13 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,399
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,595
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 18,563

In this adrenaline-charged, up-to-the-moment political thriller, Stieg Larsson's Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomkvist are back. The troubled genius hacker and crusading journalist thrilled the world in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, which have sold more than 80 million copies worldwide.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lizbeth and Bloomquist Live On

  • By Queen Kristina on 11-05-15

I don't understand why people are so picky!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-23-15

Where does The Girl in the Spider's Web rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Among the top 10%; but a lot of that is because I adore Simon Vance as a narrator.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Gabriella Grana is my favorite character. She knows the pitfalls of her life and is still true enough to herself to dive in headlong.

What does Simon Vance bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Simon Vance is definitely the best audiobook narrator. He brings such flawless timing to the readings, and the characters come to life with his inflection.

Any additional comments?

I have no idea why people get so caught up on small inconsistencies; the story is fantastic! I think that people want the characters to be static, but Lisbeth, Mikael, and Erika have changed in the way that we all do with time and circumstance.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Autobiography of Mark Twain, Volume 1

  • The Complete and Authoritative Edition
  • By: Mark Twain
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 24 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 734
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 419
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 427

The year 2010 marks the 100th anniversary of Twain’s death. In celebration of this important milestone, here, for the first time, is Mark Twain’s uncensored autobiography, in its entirety, exactly as he left it. This major literary event offers the first of three volumes and presents Mark Twain’s authentic and unsuppressed voice, brimming with humor, ideas, and opinions, and speaking clearly from the grave, as he intended.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awe and Goosebumps

  • By Gura on 11-05-10

Some books are better in paper

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-14

What did you like best about Autobiography of Mark Twain, Volume 1? What did you like least?

I couldn't get past Chapter 2. For a book with so many footnotes and such, you really need to read this in paper. It was far to difficult to enjoy the main stream of the story with all of the interruptions for references.

  • Unfamiliar Fishes

  • By: Sarah Vowell
  • Narrated by: Fred Armisen, Bill Hader, John Hodgman, and others
  • Length: 7 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,941
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,484
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,480

In Unfamiliar Fishes, Sarah Vowell argues that 1898 might be a year just as crucial to our nation's identity, a year when, in an orgy of imperialism, the United States annexed Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Guam, and invaded Cuba and then the Philippines, becoming a meddling, self-serving, militaristic international superpower practically overnight. Of all the countries the United States invaded or colonized in 1898, Vowell considers the story of the Americanization of Hawaii to be the most intriguing.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable, but celeb narrations are distracting

  • By darrin class on 05-02-11

As an Islander, I approve!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-13-12

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

I would have liked the author to have worked with a native speaker to iron out her horrific pronunciation of the Native Hawai'ian words but, otherwise, I think that Ms. Vowell did a nice job.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • An Echo in the Bone

  • A Novel
  • By: Diana Gabaldon
  • Narrated by: Davina Porter
  • Length: 45 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 18,415
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 15,410
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 15,353

Jamie Fraser knows from his time-traveling wife Claire that, no matter how unlikely it seems, America will win the Revolutionary War. But that truth offers little solace, since Jamie realizes he might find himself pointing a weapon directly at his own son - a young officer in the British army. And Jamie isn't the only one with a tormented soul - for Claire may know who wins the conflict, but she certainly doesn't know whether or not her beloved Jamie survives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Read all of Gabaldon's stuff before this one

  • By Charles on 10-17-09

The stars are really just for the last 4 hours!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-10

The star rating is also well-earned by Davina Porter's narration skills! As to the story: if I weren't already hooked on this series, my interest in this book would have died rather quickly. I only kept listening because I was "sure" that there had to be more to the story. I was finally satisfied when things began to suck me back in near the ending of the book. Wow! I cannot wait for more!

  • Genghis Khan

  • Emperor of All Men
  • By: Harold Lamb
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 7 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 328
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 124
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 125

In the early 13th century, a simple nomad chieftain managed to cobble together a powerful kingdom in the highlands of northern Asia, which was subsequently to challenge the greatest powers of the day. He was triumphant in all directions. This leader was Timujin, whose name meant "Iron Man". He became Genghis Khan, "Universal Ruler", the greatest conqueror ever known - a warrior feared from the British Isles to the tip of the Korean peninsula.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fabulous!

  • By Curatina on 06-11-07

Dreadfully Dull

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-08

There were many reasons that I finally gave up and set this book aside. There were far too many details to follow which bogged down the actual story. It is too difficult to keep track of which clans were which and what allegiances existed and when. I fully realize that the interplay between the clans and the changes in allegiance are intended to be the essence of the story...but the way it was done here just didn't capture it.

I was also very, very annoyed at the use of 'thee' and 'thine' in the statements of allegiance that many characters made to Khan. Top that with the fact that the narrator delivered them with an English accent and the whole effect was even messier.

This might be one of those books that I just plain have to read on paper.

1 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Snow Flower and the Secret Fan

  • A Novel
  • By: Lisa See
  • Narrated by: Janet Song
  • Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,194
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,337
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,338

Lily is haunted by memories of who she once was, and of a person, long gone, who defined her existence. She has nothing but time now, as she recounts the tale of Snow Flower and asks the gods for forgiveness.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Laugh a little Cry a little Love All

  • By Patricia on 11-11-09

An Absolute Delight!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-08

This book offers an excellent inside look at the class and gender discrimination that pervaded the era. The author did a lovely job of weaving the relationship of the girls into an intimate and heartwrenching story. Some might say that this book is "women's work" and would not be enjoyed by men, but my husband and I thoroughly enjoyed it as it passed the time on our daily commute.

  • Cloud Atlas

  • A Novel
  • By: David Mitchell
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick, Cassandra Campbell, Kim Mai Guest, and others
  • Length: 19 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,646
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,598
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,619

A reluctant voyager crossing the Pacific in 1850; a disinherited composer blagging a precarious livelihood in between-the-wars Belgium; a high-minded journalist in Governor Reagan's California; a vanity publisher fleeing his gangland creditors; a genetically modified "dinery server" on death-row; and Zachry, a young Pacific Islander witnessing the nightfall of science and civilisation: the narrators of Cloud Atlas hear each other's echoes down the corridor of history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I laughed often with the kindly Mr. Cavendish

  • By Aaron on 08-23-12

So Where Does It All Come Together?

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-08

I kept plowing through this story hoping that things would come together in some brilliant way but was sorely disappointed! While there were bits and pieces of interesting storytelling, the Louisa Rey vignettes mostly, the piece as a whole was a real loser.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful