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  • Lethal White

  • A Cormoran Strike Novel
  • By: Robert Galbraith
  • Narrated by: Robert Glenister
  • Length: 22 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,052
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,605
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,572

When Billy, a troubled young man, comes to private eye Cormoran Strike's office to ask for his help investigating a crime he thinks he witnessed as a child, Strike is left deeply unsettled. While Billy is obviously mentally distressed, and cannot remember many concrete details, there is something sincere about him and his story. But before Strike can question him further, Billy bolts from his office in a panic. Trying to get to the bottom of Billy's story, Strike and Robin Ellacott - once his assistant, now a partner in the agency - set off on a twisting trail that leads them through the backstreets of London....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best 22 hours of the last week

  • By Jennifer on 09-27-18

Narrator is Wonderful - too bad about the book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-18

The superlative acting skills and amazing vocal range of narrator Robert Glenister make this novel seem way more interesting than it actually is. After a few chapters of slug-like plot development, I realized that it was Glenister's voice and not the author's words that were holding my attention.
The book's protagonists – a male-female detective duo -- spend half the book earnestly pursuing a bunch of bad guys while struggling to hide their mutual attraction. (Positively Victorian. Yawn and Yawn)
It's no exploration of emotional paralysis like "Remains of the Day." It's just a poorly executed set-up that's been executed brilliantly many times before.
Oh for the teasing banter of the crime-solving Thin Man couple or the tough talking sexual tension between Bogey and Bacall.

That Robert Glenister, he could read the IRS tax laws aloud and fog up my glasses.

20 of 26 people found this review helpful

  • A History of Russia: From Peter the Great to Gorbachev

  • By: Mark Steinberg, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Mark Steinberg
  • Length: 18 hrs and 45 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 964
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 876
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 863

It's difficult to imagine a nation with a history more compelling for Americans than Russia. Before the collapse of the Soviet Union, this was the nation against which we measured our own nation's values and power and with whom war, if it ever came, could spell unimaginable catastrophe for our planet.Yet many Americans have never had the opportunity to study Russia in depth, and to see how the forces of history came together to shape a future so different from the dreams of most ordinary Russian people, eager to see their nation embrace Western values of progress, human rights, and justice.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not story-telling but history-telling at its best

  • By Shah Alam on 10-22-13

New Insight into the Russian Psyche

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-20-17

If you could sum up A History of Russia: From Peter the Great to Gorbachev in three words, what would they be?

Fascinating, illuminating, comprehensive

Who was your favorite character and why?

At the turn of the 20th Century, Russia went through a mini utopia -- a brief period of unprecedented freedoms and artistic expression. Education was widely available and millions of serfs became literate. Women could claim divorce for the first time. Social mobility was possible.

Any additional comments?

Steinberg is a wonderful story teller. He speaks Russian and seems to have a deep understanding of what it means to be Russian; how leaders ruled through benevolence or fear over the centuries. I really wish that Audible would edit out the music at the beginning and end of the lectures. The Great Courses theme uses french horns and they are real ear shredders when you're wearing head phones. It's clear from the script that one lesson is ending and a new one is beginning without the music.

  • Anna Karenina

  • By: Leo Tolstoy
  • Narrated by: Judy Franklin
  • Length: 35 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 213
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126

It tells of the love affair between Anna and Count Vronsky. Tragedy unfolds as Anna rejects her passionless marriage and must endure the hypocrisies of society. Set against the backdrop of nineteenth-century Russia, faith is challenged, bonds are broken, love dies and is reborn.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Strange recording

  • By Kim on 07-21-10

Judy Franklin is a gifted performer

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-13

Would you listen to Anna Karenina again? Why?

I HAVE listened to this recording of Anna Karenina over again. A couple of times, in fact. I will sometimes randomly pick a chapter and listen. Of course Tolstoy's writing is luscious -- but Judy Franklin conveys enough emotion to bring the characters to life and maintain the narrator's voice of distant observation -- with nuance and balance. I was sad when the book ended. I wish she had read more books that appealed to me. I would love to hear more audiobooks with her voice. I'm now listening to War and Peace and the male narrator is quite adequate, but doesn't have the depth that Franklin brings to Tolstoy.

What did you like best about this story?

I'm embarrassed to admit this is the first time I've heard/read Anna Karenina, though I knew the story. Now I know why Tolstoy is considered a genius. His writing is deceptively simple and yet fabulously layered and complex. He dives into the human psyche and lets the reader watch his characters' twist their thinking as they try to convince themselves that as long as they do what society expects, they are morally right. His characters aren't painted in broad strokes like Dickens' characters -- (though I love Dickens). Tolstoy gives his characters considerable room to grow and change. Some, who start out vapid and self-serving, become magnanimous and selfless while the very characters who started out pious and ethical show their flaws. Tolstoy writes some pretty comic passages that ridicule the behavior of the Russian aristocracy.

Although Anna is the typical faithless hussy and meets a tragic end as those women always do in 19th century novels, the novel doesn't condemn her. It's a criticism of the society she lives in.

I highly recommend it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful