LISTENER

Erik Marshall

Ypsilanti, MI, United States
  • 2
  • reviews
  • 19
  • helpful votes
  • 2
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  • The Beam: Season 1

  • By: Sean Platt, Johnny B. Truant
  • Narrated by: Johnny Heller, Tara Sands, Ralph Lister, and others
  • Length: 18 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 695
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 646
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 643

The world's old political borders have dissolved. The NAU is civilization's carcass, a nation ruled by two political parties: Enterprise, the sink-or-swim party where each party member has no one else to blame for their starvation or astronomical wealth; and Directorate, whose members have a guaranteed safety net but can never rise above their station.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sheer entertainment

  • By cristina on 07-09-15

Great audio to a very good story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-06-14

I had already read the book, but I thought it would be interesting to listen to the audiobook as well. The story is quite complicated, and I figured it would be nice to get a refresher.

I don't know what I expected, but what I got was amazing. This audiobook has an amazing cast of voice actors, one for each point of view character in the book. This really helps keep the characters straight, and keeps me from driving off the road in boredom from listening to the same voice over and over.

Not only are there many voices, but the voices are *good*. Each one captures the spirit of the character and makes listening to this book a dynamic, pleasurable experience. I am confident that if I hadn't read the book first, I would still be able to follow along with no problem.

Overall, some great audio to an intriguing, complex, satisfying sf story.

16 of 21 people found this review helpful

  • Plugged

  • How Hyperconnectivity and the Beam Changed the Way We Think
  • By: Sterling Gibson, Sean Platt, Johnny B. Truant
  • Narrated by: Blaine Moore
  • Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23

Throughout the 21st Century, our world (at least for those of us inside the NAU) has become increasingly connected. So much so that we really are now thinking as a single fluid organism, changing not just how we live our daily lives, but who we are as a species. In Sterling Gibson's newest thoughtful exploration, one of the NAU's most renowned thinkers explores and illuminates how hyperconnectivity and The Beam have changed us forever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great SF take on Malcolm Gladwell-style journalism

  • By Erik Marshall on 07-14-14

Great SF take on Malcolm Gladwell-style journalism

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-14

This book is a faux-journalistic style book is meant as an adjunct to The Beam universe, by Johnny B. Truant and Sean Platt. If you don't know The Beam, this won't make much sense. If you do know The Beam, however, (and you should -- it's great), this explains a lot of things that happened pre-Beam, and gives insight on how the technology of The Beam came about, filling in holes between the (so far) two seasons of the series.

It's not just a history, though, but a thought piece on how these technologies have changed the way people think in the future. The beauty of this book is in how the fictional author extrapolates ways of thinking, living and being from the technological advances, and how, although it is SF, one can see these happening today. The best science fiction is rooted in the present, and this does not fail to shed light on our current trends of dealing with increasingly connected technology.

I am also happy to see that the author, Sterling Gibson, has begun to play a fairly pivotal role in the most recent episodes of The Beam: Season Two. Talk about hyperconnectivity!

The audio narration is fluid and easy to follow, even in some of the denser passages.I could imagine a narrator getting bogged down in the details, but that doesn't happen here. I would recommend this for anyone who has at least read the first season of The Beam, but not for anyone unversed in the universe.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful