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Stefan

Lexington, KY, United States
  • 10
  • reviews
  • 14
  • helpful votes
  • 18
  • ratings
  • Tough Guys Don't Dance

  • A Novel
  • By: Norman Mailer
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 9 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 10

When Tim Madden, an unsuccessful writer living on Cape Cod, awakes with a gruesome hangover, a painful tattoo on his upper arm, and a severed female head in his marijuana stash, he has almost no memory of the night before. As he reconstructs the missing hours, Madden runs afoul of retired prizefighters, sex addicts, mediums, former cons, a world-weary ex-girlfriend, and his own father, old now but still a Herculean figure.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • way too predictable

  • By Stefan on 02-21-19

way too predictable

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-19

had high hopes for this 'noir thriller', but no comparison to Ascenseur pour l'échafaud / lift to the gallows. The plot is very predictable and the ending sappy.

  • The Rational Male

  • By: Rollo Tomassi
  • Narrated by: Sam Botta
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,754
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,399
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,370

Rollo Tomassi is one of the leading voices in the globally growing, male-focused online consortium known as the "Manosphere". Outlined are the concepts of positive masculinity, the feminine imperative, plate theory, operative social conventions, and the core psychological theory behind game awareness and "red pill" ideology. Tomassi explains and outlines the principles of intergender social dynamics and foundational reasoning behind them.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • could be better

  • By CapitalStep on 03-14-18

good thoughts, enlightening

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-19

good introduction into the manosphere, highly recommended. However, it comes out a bit too negative overall, lacking a positive outlook or way of action

  • American Lion

  • Andrew Jackson in the White House
  • By: Jon Meacham
  • Narrated by: Richard McGonagle
  • Length: 17 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 934
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 753
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 744

Beloved and hated, venerated and reviled, Andrew Jackson was an orphan who fought his way to the pinnacle of power, bending the nation to his will in the cause of democracy. Jackson's election in 1828 ushered in a new and lasting era in which the people, not distant elites, were the guiding force in American politics. Democracy made its stand in the Jackson years, and he gave voice to the hopes and the fears of a restless, changing nation facing challenging times at home and threats abroad.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • When the time for action has come, stop thinking.

  • By Darwin8u on 05-21-18

highly informative, well presented

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-18

I got this book because Donald Trump put Andrew Jackson painting into his office. After listening to this book, I can see why: a person popular with people, hated by the establishment, someone who loved to fight and someone who hated the central bank. I did not know about the petticoat affair in Jackson's white house, which makes Stormy Daniels and Monica Lewinsky look like well-handled minor glitches. Highly recommended to read!

  • Origin

  • A Novel
  • By: Dan Brown
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 18 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,404
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,929
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36,818

In keeping with his trademark style, Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code and Inferno, interweaves codes, science, religion, history, art, and architecture in this new novel. Origin thrusts Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon into the dangerous intersection of humankind's two most enduring questions - and the earthshaking discovery that will answer them.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Formula over fiction

  • By Evan M Carlson on 11-01-17

getting too predictable

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-01-18

The book follows the usual Dan Brown recipe of looking at religion vs modern age through the eyes of Robert Langdon. This time the theme is evolution and artificial intelligence. As usually the locations are well researched with ample, interesting description of the various buildings and sites in Spain. The description of artificial intelligence getting 'out of control' is also plausible, given recent advances. Some of the descriptions of the Urey experiment-simulation are inaccurate though, for example nucleic acids (RNA, not mentioned) will appear before proteins and DNA will come last.
The major drawback is that the theme gets old and the hinting of 'fake culprits' is too predictable.

  • The Way of Men

  • By: Jack Donovan
  • Narrated by: Jack Donovan
  • Length: 4 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,055
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,836
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,824

What is masculinity? Ask ten men and you'll get ten vague, conflicting answers. Unlike any book of its kind, The Way of Men offers a simple, straightforward answer - without getting bogged down in religion, morality, or politics. It's a guide for understanding who men have been and the challenges men face today. The Way of Men captures the silent, stifling rage of men everywhere who find themselves at odds with the overregulated, overcivilized, politically correct modern world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Needs to be re-recorded

  • By Avid Reader on 05-19-17

really inspiring

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-16

a good analysis of the role of men in modern society. Men have been forced to play roles that are against their biological nature, mainly because they are easier to control and rule this way. The book analyzes the political agenda to 'feminize' men and offers a few alternatives, such as bonding in small peer groups. I enjoyed discussing this with my teenage daughters.

  • The Fever of 1721

  • The Epidemic That Revolutionized Medicine and American Politics
  • By: Stephen Coss
  • Narrated by: Bob Souer
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 99
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 88
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 88

During the worst smallpox epidemic in Boston history, Mather convinced Doctor Boylston to try a procedure that he believed would prevent death - by making an incision in the arm of a healthy person and implanting it with smallpox. "Inoculation" led to vaccination, one of the most profound medical discoveries in history.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • not just about smallpox, more a picture of boston.

  • By Stefan on 04-09-16

not just about smallpox, more a picture of boston.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-16

….60 years before the american revolution.

Most of the story centers around political and religious life in Boston, describing the rising tension between the emerging political parties and the British governors. A lot of the petty fighting sounded familiar to todays political fights.
The description of the smallpox epidemic and its treatment through inoculation was interesting, but its role in revolutionizing american publishing and politics was a bit of a stretch.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Panzer Commander

  • The Memoirs of Colonel Hans von Luck
  • By: Hans von Luck, Stephen E. Ambrose (introduction)
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 15 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,853
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,729
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,727

A stunning look at World War II from the other side.... From the turret of a German tank, Colonel Hans von Luck commanded Rommel's 7th and then 21st Panzer Division. El Alamein, Kasserine Pass, Poland, Belgium, Normandy on D-Day, the disastrous Russian front - von Luck fought there with some of the best soldiers in the world. German soldiers. Awarded the German Cross in Gold and the Knight's Cross, von Luck writes as an officer and a gentleman.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Reads like Forrest Gump ( a fiction )

  • By Randall on 11-08-16

interesting personal story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-14

Hans von Luck was a career soldier who fought in France, Africa and Russia during WWII. He gives his very personal account. It is clear that he was not a Nazi, more like a conservative, very traditional german officer who felt bound by his oath to follow his orders and fight to the end. An interesting aspect of the book is his relationship and clear admiration for Erwin Rommel, who was his superior officer in Africa and France.

He describes only his personal viewpoint, and not the 'big political picture', which appears to be very honest. From his account, the superb tactical and technical training of german officers, as well as the leading (in civilian words: management) of their enlisted men was the main contributor to early war success and the resilience in the later stages of the war.
I heard one of my grand-uncles who hold the same rank in WWII speaking through his narrative, especially on how to treat subordinates and POWs.

A drawback of the book is the narrator who has a strong french accent. Some of the german phrases are hardly understandable.





1 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Boomerang

  • Travels in the New Third World
  • By: Michael Lewis
  • Narrated by: Dylan Baker
  • Length: 7 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,532
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,958
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,972

The tsunami of cheap credit that rolled across the planet between 2002 and 2008 was more than a simple financial phenomenon: it was temptation, offering entire societies the chance to reveal aspects of their characters they could not normally afford to indulge. The Greeks wanted to turn their country into a pinata stuffed with cash and allow as many citizens as possible to take a whack at it. The Germans wanted to be even more German; the Irish wanted to stop being Irish.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An easy intro to the global financial crisis

  • By Diana - Audible on 04-17-12

Entertaining story, but too simplistic

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-11

Michael Lewis describes the financial crisis in different countries. The book is full of interesting anecdotes and highly entertaining. His main thesis is that you can see a people’s character when they are in a dark room full of money. This line is too simplistic. The author does not know well the culture of most of the countries he visited or speaks their language, and much of the description is thus superficial. I say this as a German who lived 1/3 of his life in the USA. For example, the better performance of Germany in the current crisis is not so much caused by the alleged ‘anal fixation or holocaust-guilt ‘of the German people, but by a political system that is less dependent on campaign donations from banks and can therefore control the financial sector a little bit better than the US or Greece.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Sex and War

  • How Biology Explains Warfare and Terrorism and Offers a Path to a Safer World
  • By: Malcom Potts, Thomas Hayden
  • Narrated by: Dennis Holland
  • Length: 16 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 137
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 103
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 107

Human beings have been battling one another since time immemorial. But why war and terrorism? Why are men almost always the killers, and why are war and sex so inextricably linked? Why do we kill members of our own species intentionally, when few other animals do so?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • New Perspective

  • By Craig C. on 08-26-11

very convincing and thought-provoking hypothesis

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-11

The main hypothesis of the book is that humans evolved by selecting males that killed most successfully non-related humans from other groups ("outgroups"), while at the same time were most supportive and emphatic towards members of their own group ("ingroup"), which gave them a reproductive advantage.

This theory is well documented by hard data from biology, archeology, sociology and gives a concise picture of human behavior, which is applied to recent political events, such as the response to 9/11.

The authors promote the idea that empowering woman by allowing them to control the number of their children through access of contraceptives is the most effective way of war prevention.
Although their theory cannot be fully proven like models in physics or molecular biology, it is worth considering, as it explains so many aspects of human behavior.
One aspect that could have been investigated in more detail is "paternity fraud", where a woman gives a man the false impression that he is the father of her child. Several studies estimate this number to be around 10% (but there are studies with a higher and lower rate). This suggests that woman developed a strategy to escape strict male dominance and genetic traits underpinning this 'cheating' strategy will be in our current gene pool. Thus even if contraception reduces the number of humans on earth and their fight for resources, this world might not be as peaceful as the authors hope.

This book was very well written and narrated, enjoyed listening/reading to it and fully recommend it.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Professor of Secrets

  • Mystery, Medicine, and Alchemy in Renaissance Italy
  • By: William Eamon
  • Narrated by: Victor Bevine
  • Length: 11 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

this exciting story illuminates the captivating world of the late Renaissance - in this case its plagues, remedies, and alchemy - through the life of Leonardo Fioravanti, a brilliant, remarkably forward-thinking, and utterly unconventional doctor. Fioravanti's marvelous cures and talent for self-aggrandizement earned him the adoration of the people, the scorn of the medical establishment, and a reputation as one of the age's most colorful, combative figures.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • very informative and well researched

  • By Stefan on 03-16-11

very informative and well researched

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-16-11

This book gives a very good overview of the development of medicine during the transition from the middle ages to renaissance. Since it follows one person, it gives lots of colorful details that are easy to follow. I found parallels between renaissance medical establishment and today's medical practice very interesting.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful