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  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 6
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  • I Heard You Paint Houses

  • Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran and Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa
  • By: Charles Brandt
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,114
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 939
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 942

"I heard you paint houses" are the first words Jimmy Hoffa ever spoke to Frank "the Irishman" Sheeran. To paint a house is to kill a man. The paint is the blood that splatters on the walls and floors. In the course of nearly five years of recorded interviews Frank Sheeran confessed to Charles Brandt that he handled more than 25 hits for the mob, and for his friend Hoffa.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't give up!

  • By Grace Azul on 05-30-10

Fascinating and surprisingly touching

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-18

Once he reached the age of majority, he was responsible for his own decisions, but I could understand how it all happened, step by step, by step.

  • The Making of a Marchioness

  • By: Frances Hodgson-Burnett
  • Narrated by: Lucy Scott
  • Length: 8 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 275
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 244
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 248

Frances Hodgson Burnett published The Making of a Marchioness in 1901. She had written Little Lord Fauntleroy 15 years before and would write The Secret Garden in 10 years' time; it is these two books for which she is best known. Yet Marchioness was one of Nancy Mitford's favourite books, was considered 'the best novel Mrs Hodgson Burnett wrote' by Marghanita Laski, and is taught on a university course in America together with novels such as Pride and Prejudice, Jane Eyre, and Daisy Miller.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Sweet Romantic Tale

  • By Curatina on 11-23-11

Maudlin and tedious at times, however...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-18

I appreciated the fact that there are solid observations about human nature in the story. If you can, at least, stand this story, and if you really like the like the setting, I'd recommend The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins, which is available on Audible. I found it to be much more interesting and engaging.

  • Lady Fortescue Steps Out

  • The Poor Relation, Book 1
  • By: M. C. Beaton
  • Narrated by: Davina Porter
  • Length: 4 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,662
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,399
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,401

Life is not easy for the poor relations of England’s upper crust, but fate and clever schemes bring them together. Lady Fortescue and Colonel Sandhurst hatch a plan: What if they were to transform her decrepit Bond Street home into a posh hotel, offering their guests the pleasure of being waited upon by nobility? With the help of other down-and-out aristocrats, they do just that, and London’s newest hotel, The Poor Relation, is born. The establishment is an immediate hit with London’s most illustrious citizens, save the Duke of Rowcester....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Charming Regency Fun - Romance & Adventure

  • By Clare on 05-04-12

Not a mystery

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-18

It is a regency romance. Not lurid, but slightly nauseating to someone who hates mush. Do you, or do you not object to the kinds of words which are sprinkled throughout: Throb, thrill, slightly parted lips, gently this, gently that, gently the other? AUGGGGH! The story is okay, there is some character development, but not a lot. A few interesting tidbits about the customs of the time.

  • The Corner Shop

  • By: Elizabeth Cadell
  • Narrated by: Helen Taylor
  • Length: 6 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 34

Lucille Abbey runs her London secretarial agency with utmost efficiency. When, therefore, a certain Professor Hallam rejects three girls sent by her to apply for the post of his secretary and they each pronounce him "impossible", Lucille herself sets out to interview the Professor at his home in Hampshire. He is, she finds, eccentric—even impossible; but he represents a challenge and, what is more, an excuse to delay what promises to be a trying holiday in Paris. She stays on to tame and to organize him—a less formidable task than she had imagined; in fact, she grows fond of him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another lovely recording of a favorite author/sto

  • By Pauline Baird Jones on 06-06-17

Pure corn

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-18

Having read other books by this author, I was confident that The Corner Shop would be a satisfying read. But the story was rambling, loose, and sometimes tedious, the characters irritatingly ill-defined. This is a favorite author of mine, but I regret the time I spent listening to this particular book of hers.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful