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Scott Wilkerson

  • 2
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 2
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  • One Bullet Away

  • The Making of Marine Officer
  • By: Nathaniel Fick
  • Narrated by: Nathaniel Fick
  • Length: 6 hrs and 5 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 685
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 456
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 460

A former captain in the Marines' First Recon Battalion, who fought in Afghanistan and Iraq, reveals how the Corps trains its elite and offers a point-blank account of twenty-first-century battle. Fick's training begins with a hellish summer at Quantico, after his junior year at Dartmouth, and advances to the pinnacle, Recon, four years later, on the eve of war with Iraq.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good story badly abridged

  • By Gillian on 10-14-07

It's not a regular job

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-18-18

It helps when a combat soldier can depend on those who's freedom he's protecting care enough to at least try and understand.

  • The Lewis and Clark Journals

  • An American Epic of Discovery
  • By: Lewis, Clark
  • Narrated by: Patrick Cullen
  • Length: 18 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 180
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 127
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130

In their own words, recorded in the famous journals of Lewis and Clark, the members of the Corps of Discovery tell their story with an immediacy and power missing from secondhand accounts. All of their triumphs and terrors are here: the thrill of seeing the vast herds of bison, the fear the captains felt when Sacagawea fell ill, the ordeal of crossing the Continental Divide, the misery of cold and hunger, and the kidnapping and rescue of Lewis' dog, Seaman.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enlightening

  • By Scott Wilkerson on 01-28-18

Enlightening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-18

The actual day to day observations revealed here lead to a very different reality than what we were taught as children. It relieves a certain unjustified guilt we have been made to carry by distorted reports about early American history.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful