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Michael

Grapevine, TX, United States
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  • 44
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  • The Fourth Monkey

  • By: J. D. Barker
  • Narrated by: Edoardo Ballerini, Graham Winton
  • Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,358
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,057
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,047

Se7en meets The Silence of the Lambs in this dark and twisting novel from the author Jeffery Deaver called "a talented writer with a delightfully devious mind". For over five years, the Four Monkey Killer has terrorized the residents of Chicago. When his body is found, the police quickly realize he was on his way to deliver one final message, one that proves he has taken another victim, who may still be alive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Twisted Knives And Killer Humor

  • By Charles Atkinson on 08-15-17

What a find!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-18

I can't remember why I bought this, to tell the truth. Was it on some best-of list? Not sure. But I loved it. The characters are great. The dialogue is natural.

I will say that early on I saw a major twist coming, but that did not ruin it for me. In fact, I think the author wanted me to know before the other characters figured it out -- or puzzled it out. But some twists I didn't see coming at all.

This will be a very good series. Already downloaded the next book.

  • Overcoming Dyslexia

  • By: Sally Shaywitz M.D.
  • Narrated by: Anna Fields
  • Length: 13 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 259
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158

From one of the world's leading experts on reading and dyslexia comes the most comprehensive, up-to-date, and practical book yet to help one understand, identify, and overcome the reading problems that plague American children today. For the one in every five children who has dyslexia and the millions of others who struggle to read at their own grade levels, as well as for their parents, teachers, and tutors, this book can make a difference.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Dyslexia Adults Don't Buy

  • By Brooke on 06-16-06

A must-read for parents of dyslexics

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-18

My title seems a bit obvious, but here's a little advice. My son was diagnosed in kindergarten, which is pretty young. So I skipped around a lot of the parts about older kids and the help they need with self confidence. We're just not there yet. But the science and explanation and advice about how to talk to your kids is exceptional.

This book was recommended by officials at my school district, including a good family friend, and I am so glad they shared this with us. I feel much more confident about my son's future, and -- much more important -- I feel like I have some tools now to help him feel more confident, too.

  • The Whistler

  • By: John Grisham
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 13 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13,385
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 12,030
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11,959

Lacy Stoltz is an investigator for the Florida Board on Judicial Conduct. She is a lawyer, not a cop, and it is her job to respond to complaints dealing with judicial misconduct. After nine years with the board, she knows that most problems are caused by incompetence, not corruption. But a corruption case eventually crosses her desk. A previously disbarred lawyer is back in business with a new identity. He now goes by the name Greg Myers, and he claims to know of a Florida judge who has stolen more money than all other crooked judges combined.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • It's John Grisham, right?

  • By Elle on 10-30-16

Great characters and some nice twists

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-18

If you like Grisham, you won't be disappointed. He takes a tangled web of conspiracy and keeps pulling at the threads, all while taking you on a tour through legal processes that a lesser writer would make seem dull. What was interesting in this story was the twist about a third of the way through. No spoilers here.

My only gripe is that the narrator seemed too silky smooth for the content. She's a good narrator, no question. But her voice and style did not seem to match the characters or story very well. So you have a very sophisticated, smooth voice telling an, at times, rough story about gritty characters.

  • Road to Jonestown

  • Jim Jones and Peoples Temple
  • By: Jeff Guinn
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 17 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,576
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,456
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,449

In the 1950s a young Indianapolis minister named Jim Jones preached a curious blend of the Gospel and Marxism. His congregation was racially integrated, and he was a much-lauded leader in the contemporary civil rights movement. Eventually Jones moved his church, Peoples Temple, to Northern California. He became involved in electoral politics and soon was a prominent Bay Area leader.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Religion, politics and death. The story of humans and their need to belong.

  • By Lisa M Crowell on 05-09-17

Full of insight and delivered even-handedly

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-18

This book is scarier than any Stephen King book could be. The first two-thirds of the book goes by, and you're wondering where and when does this guy become a mass murderer? The author does this very well and even acknowledges at some point that this man who would later be compared to Hitler was, at a certain point, more likely to be compared to Martin Luther King Jr.

I learned a lot in this book about the roots of the cause, the background of the man and the events that led up to the mass suicide/murder.

One small quibble. The author tries to insert some suspense as if we don't know how the story ends. It just seems goofy at certain parts where a reference to the mass killing would have made more sense.

  • The Man in the High Castle

  • By: Philip K. Dick
  • Narrated by: Jeff Cummings
  • Length: 9 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5,238
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,802
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,819

It's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some 20 years earlier the United States lost a war - and is now occupied jointly by Nazi Germany and Japan.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Alternative history

  • By Michael G Kurilla on 07-28-15

Don't watch it if the TV series pulled you in

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-18

The key difference between the novel and the TV series is that stuff happens in the TV series. The novel is all introspection and inner monologue of some pretty mundane stuff. It is set against the backdrop of the interesting premise, but it is not ABOUT those things.

The book follows four main characters as they ponder proper etiquette in a stifling culture. Spoiler alerts: A scary plot by the Germans is discussed but never comes to pass.

The narrator was pretty bad, but then again, the language he was charged with reading was racist and stilted. Most of the book is written in broken English. Why? It's mostly introspective. Why would a Japanese leader think in broken English?

In short, the book is a hot mess. The TV series is pretty good.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Shoe Dog

  • A Memoir by the Creator of Nike
  • By: Phil Knight
  • Narrated by: Norbert Leo Butz, Phil Knight - introduction
  • Length: 13 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 25,090
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22,563
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 22,559

In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company's early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world's most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A must listen to book- It's the perfect biz memoir

  • By Brock on 06-02-16

Honest and raw

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-18

Me. Knight is an amazing storyteller with an awesome story to tell. The struggles and spiritual journey he describes are required reading for anyone with a big idea.

  • Not My Father's Son: A Memoir

  • By: Alan Cumming
  • Narrated by: Alan Cumming
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,798
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,286
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,250

With ribald humor, wit, and incredible insight, Alan seamlessly moves back and forth in time, integrating stories from his childhood in Scotland and his experiences today as the celebrated actor of film, television, and stage. At times suspenseful, at times deeply moving, but always incredibly brave and honest, Not My Father's Son is a powerful story of embracing the best aspects of the past and triumphantly pushing the darkness aside.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Best Part of Saturday

  • By George Knight on 12-16-14

Fantastic story with inspiration and insight

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-18

I coached more than 400 writers in how to tell their personal stories to help share their wisdom and change the way people think. I did that as a newspaper editor for a large daily, and I kept hoping that this form of personal storytelling and sharing would become a unique modern art form. This memoir is perfection along these lines. It’s raw and authentic, relatable yet remarkable. So many memoirs are all introspection and not at all helpful to readers, but Mr. Cumming shares an important story and great life lessons along the way.

  • Where They Found Her

  • A Novel
  • By: Kimberly McCreight
  • Narrated by: Tavia Gilbert, Lauren Fortgang, Rachel F. Hirsch, and others
  • Length: 11 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,596
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,274
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,271

At the end of a long winter in well-to-do Ridgedale, New Jersey, the body of an infant is discovered in the woods near the town's prestigious university campus. No one knows who the baby is or how her body ended up out there. But there is no shortage of opinions.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Dark, twist filled novel

  • By Chad G. on 04-18-15

Very good with one annoying element

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-18

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would, but I would not recommend it to any of my journalist friends. Spoiler alert: I don't understand how someone as smart as McCreight, an Ivy League Law School graduate, could be so sloppy in the way she treated both the supposed news stories and the completely absurd and unnecessary DNA testing subplot. Supposedly, to identify a dead baby found by the water, the police are going to do a community-wide voluntary DNA testing program. That makes no sense. It counts on the perpetrator of a crime to come forward and be tested. Would police ever ask for voluntary fingerprinting to solve a crime? No, but fingerprints are used to solve far more crimes than DNA. So, so, so absurd.

And then the reaction by the journalist and her husband. Oh, you're covering it, so you're helping them. That's a childish argument and subplot. And here's the worst part. It led NOWHERE. It was completely irrelevant to the story. Would the chief be shocked to see that his DNA was a partial match!?!?! Nope ... never went there. Could have, and it might have explained the absurd setup, but no. I really enjoyed the rest of this story. She did a great job of weaving a complicated tale with many characters. She is a genius at casting suspicion and making connections that might not be connections. That makes her DNA subplot so much more mysteriously awful.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, it was very compelling.

Any additional comments?

One more thing: She should have asked a journalist for a little help. The essay written under the guise of a news story by the so-called reporter? Nope. That would not happen. And the idea that she owned the story because she covered the first day? Um, maybe that was true in 1940s movies about newspapers, but not anymore. A little help from a journalist would have gone a long way in making this story more credible.

  • The Great Train Robbery

  • By: Michael Crichton
  • Narrated by: Michael Kitchen
  • Length: 8 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,910
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,599
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,581

In teeming Victorian London, where lavish wealth and appalling poverty live side by side, Edward Pierce charms the most prominent of the well-to-do as he cunningly orchestrates the crime of the century. Who would suspect that a gentleman of breeding could mastermind the daring theft of a fortune in gold? Who could predict the consequences of making the extraordinary robbery aboard the pride of England's industrial era, the mighty steam locomotive?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • UTTERLY DELIGHTFUL!

  • By stevenk1155 on 09-20-17

Great narration and wonderful storytelling

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-18

If you could sum up The Great Train Robbery in three words, what would they be?

Crisp historical storytelling

What other book might you compare The Great Train Robbery to and why?

Sherlock Holmes. The clipped British writing and time period lead to natural comparisons.

Have you listened to any of Michael Kitchen’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No, but he is awesome! He reminds me a little of Monty Python's stuffy British narrator, in a good way.

Any additional comments?

This book is great at mixing historical scene-setting with storytelling. It blends back and forth, like a painting, into both of these genres. It proves Michael Crichton is not just creative, but also very skilled at telling a story and setting a scene.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Alice Network

  • A Novel
  • By: Kate Quinn
  • Narrated by: Saskia Maarleveld
  • Length: 15 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,194
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,684
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,592

In the chaotic aftermath of World War II, American college girl Charlie St. Clair is pregnant, unmarried, and on the verge of being thrown out of her very proper family. She's also nursing a desperate hope that her beloved cousin Rose, who disappeared in Nazi-occupied France during the war, might still be alive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • We are standing on the shoulders of giants...

  • By Marie on 02-25-18

Reads like a Hallmark Channel movie

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-18

Would you try another book from Kate Quinn and/or Saskia Maarleveld?

No. I didn’t realize what I was getting. If you look at her other books and their covers you realize this is mostly trashy romance stuff.

Did Saskia Maarleveld do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

Yes, her characters were good, but you couldn’t tell when she was speaking dialogue or just reading the person’s internal thoughts. Maybe that was just bad writing.

32 of 41 people found this review helpful