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Victor L. Marsh, II

Detroit, MI United States
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  • 1
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  • 7
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  • A Ph.D. Is Not Enough!

  • A Guide to Survival in Science
  • By: Peter J. Feibelman
  • Narrated by: Peter J. Feibelman
  • Length: 3 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63

Despite your graduate education, brainpower, and technical prowess, your career in scientific research is far from assured. Permanent positions are scarce, science survival is rarely part of formal graduate training, and a good mentor is hard to find. This exceptional volume explains what stands between you and fulfilling long-term research career. Bringing the key survival skills into focus, A Ph.D. Is Not Enough! proposes a rational approach to establishing yourself as a scientist.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • THIS BOOK IS NOT ENOUGH!!!

  • By AnthonyStevens on 02-27-11

practical and helpful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-18

Excellent introduction to my new career. Missing from other books was advice on tone in academic writing. From grant proposal to papers, the tonal "how to" sections of this book are helpful.

  • Weapons of Math Destruction

  • How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy
  • By: Cathy O'Neil
  • Narrated by: Cathy O'Neil
  • Length: 6 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,511
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,352
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,350

We live in the age of the algorithm. Increasingly the decisions that affect our lives - where we go to school, whether we get a car loan, how much we pay for health insurance - are being made not by humans but by mathematical models. In theory this should lead to greater fairness. But as Cathy O'Neil reveals in this urgent and necessary book, the opposite is true. Tracing the arc of a person's life, O'Neil exposes the black-box models that shape our future, both as individuals and as a society.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A fascinating and startling look at where big data is blind

  • By Stephen on 10-02-16

Engagingly told

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-17

This is an excellent introduction to the practical impact of mathematical models in modern society. It's not just about the economic sectors, but also judicial, and in education too. The author has a point of view, but at least address other ways of interpreting things directly (and convincingly, I think).

For future directions: there are challenges facing both the left and the right in terms of acting on the recommendations of this excellent book. Both sides claim they want people to have freedom. Ironically, the most tech-friendly folks (the left) are also least concerned about its monopoly power. On the other side, the most freedom-loving folks (the right) are also least concerned about locking up minorities or unfairly punishing teachers with bad math models.

What remains is a pathway in which both sides are hoodwinked into believing that the author's bold ideas might serve their worst biases. That's always a tall order in public policy. It's a worthy future project for those who have the technical skills and political connections to act on the author's excellent recommendations and well-argued perspectives.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful