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Jenna Wattenbarger

Woodstock GA
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 9
  • helpful votes
  • 21
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  • The Personal History of Rachel DuPree

  • A Novel
  • By: Ann Weisgarber
  • Narrated by: Quincy Tyler Bernstine
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 98
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84

Praised by Alice Walker and many other best-selling writers, The Personal History of Rachel DuPree is an award-winning debut novel with incredible heart about life on the prairie as it's rarely been seen. Reminiscent of The Color Purple as well as the frontier novels of Laura Ingalls Wilder and Willa Cather, it opens a window on the little-known history of African American homesteaders and gives voice to an extraordinary heroine who embodies the spirit that built America.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I love this book.

  • By I. Lewis on 03-24-17

1800s homesteading in all its pain & minutiae

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-18

It's hard to come upon books that deal with the day to day women's work of the past. I wonder if she called this a personal history because as opposed to men's histories, it isn't about conquering or achieving something great in the world's eyes so much as the work women did privately and the Incredible strength that they had. what they cooked, the furnishings of her home, her Chicago childhood as a black girl in the early 20th century, what they wore, how they secured water, the little things she was able to give her children such as rag dolls and fairy tales. Some parts of this book were difficult to listen to. It just goes on and on. Hungry children gathering cow chips for the stove in the miserable biting cold of South Dakota. Their thirst through the drought is palpable; the dust in their throats in mouths and how she dreams of washing everything when the rains come, as her husband promises they will. What I really loved about this book, aside from satisfying my curiosity about what it would have been like on a daily basis to live as a woman in that time, is the pure, selfless heart of Rachel Dupree as she works to maintain her love for her husband and her children's innocence, wanting to give what she calls a dab of sweetness to their lives, which she admits will probably mostly be hard work.

  • Amy and Isabelle

  • A Novel
  • By: Elizabeth Strout
  • Narrated by: Stephanie Roberts
  • Length: 11 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 268
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 249
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 250

With compassion, humor, and striking insight, Amy and Isabelle explores the secrets of sexuality that jeopardize the love between a mother and her daughter. Amy Goodrow, a shy high school student in a small mill town, falls in love with her math teacher, and together they cross the line between understandable fantasy and disturbing reality. When discovered, this emotional and physical trespass brings disgrace to Amy's mother, Isabelle, and intensifies the shame she feels about her own past.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Honest, tough and absorbing

  • By Catherine on 11-03-14

ordinary people aren't ordinary.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-17

coming of age story, unsentimental yet lovely. i reduced speed to 85 percent. makes you sympathize (love, really) the "uptight spinster" archetype & the "teenagers are awful" trope. a rebuke to the idea that a person has to think intellectual, existential thoughts in order to be deep; to the idea that you aren't of interest or worth unless you're some kind of super sexy, highly important person.

  • The Sympathizer

  • A Novel
  • By: Viet Thanh Nguyen
  • Narrated by: Francois Chau
  • Length: 13 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,957
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,550
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,526

Pulitzer Prize, Fiction, 2016. It is April 1975, and Saigon is in chaos. At his villa, a general of the South Vietnamese army is drinking whiskey and, with the help of his trusted captain, drawing up a list of those who will be given passage aboard the last flights out of the country. The general and his compatriots start a new life in Los Angeles, unaware that one among their number, the captain, is secretly observing and reporting on the group to a higher-up in the Viet Cong.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Great Vietnamese Novel(Port)Nguyen's Complaint

  • By Joe Kraus on 03-31-16

a refreshing new take on literary sexism

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-17

a horny testosterone-fueled male fantasy masquerading as subaltern historical literature. spies, generals, etc & the wives & whores who serve them. but hey, gives us the ethnic POV & there's some real eloquent turns of phrases, not to mention all that research, so by all means give this man a pulitzer. spank bank material & the assuaging of white guilt all in one read? put this on every alt-white man's must-read list of 2016.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • So You've Been Publicly Shamed

  • By: Jon Ronson
  • Narrated by: Jon Ronson
  • Length: 7 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,528
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,075
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,045

From the Sunday Times top ten bestselling author of The Psychopath Test, a captivating and brilliant exploration of one of our world's most underappreciated forces: shame. 'It's about the terror, isn't it?' 'The terror of what?' I said. 'The terror of being found out.' For the past three years, Jon Ronson has travelled the world meeting recipients of high-profile public shamings. The shamed are people like us - people who, say, made a joke on social media that came out badly, or made a mistake at work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thank You To All Who Recommended This!

  • By Gretchen SLP on 08-26-16

so entertaining.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-18-16

If you've ever wondered why Facebook makes you feel more inhibited or why comment trolls exist, you'll love this book. Entertaining, pithy, filled with great investigative journalism. Robson's accent is great.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Liespotting

  • Proven Techniques to Detect Deception
  • By: Pamela Meyer
  • Narrated by: Karen Saltus
  • Length: 6 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 396
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 348
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 347

People - friends, family members, work colleagues, salespeople - lie to us all the time. Daily, hourly, constantly. None of us is immune, and all of us are victims. According to studies by several different researchers, most of us encounter nearly 200 lies a day. Now there’s something we can do about it. Liespotting links three disciplines - facial recognition training, interrogation training, and a comprehensive survey of research in the field - into a specialized body of information developed specifically to help business leaders detect deception....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • About 1/4 of the book is about Lie Spotting

  • By Joshua on 06-25-12

just watch the TED talk.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-03-16

I listened to Meyer's TED Talk and immediately downloaded the book. This was a mistake. All of the book's meat is in the talk. The rest is cocktail party chatter: "Do you know what a Freudian slip is? Or that genuine smiles are in both the eyes and the lips?" The kind of information you pick up reading one of those Babble articles. This is a self-help book that spends a bulk of its words discussing what the book will help you achieve, without actually getting there. Perhaps a pithy essay would have sufficed. Instead, Meyer piles on clichéd historical and business anecdotes, referencing Darwin, Enron, John Edwards, lie detectors. Its most interesting claims--such as that married couples lie to one another in one tenth of their interactions--are never explained. What were the details of the study? What are these lies about? That "no, honey, you don't look fat in that?" The narrator is terribly robotic; too bad the author didn't narrate, as her voice at least is engaging. I recommend that you listen to the TED Talk for free and save your credit.

  • The Bostonians

  • By: Henry James
  • Narrated by: Xe Sands
  • Length: 17 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 46

From Boston's social underworld emerges Verena Tarrant, a girl with extraordinary oratorical gifts, which she deploys in tawdry meeting-houses on behalf of "the sisterhood of women." She acquires two admirers of a very different stamp: Olive Chancellor, devotee of radical causes and marked out for tragedy; and Basil Ransom, a veteran of the Civil War who holds rigid views concerning society and women's place therein. Is the lovely, lighthearted Verena made for public movements or private passions?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic reading!

  • By Francey on 07-15-11

amazing.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-27-15

wow great story. narrator nailed the voices. going to read more of his books for sure.

  • The Art of Conflict Management: Achieving Solutions for Life, Work, and Beyond

  • By: Michael Dues, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Michael Dues
  • Length: 12 hrs and 21 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,270
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,085

In 24 lectures brimming with practical tips, tools, and techniques everyone can use to better manage conflict in his or her professional and personal lives, gain the essential skills of conflict management. As presented by Professor Dues, these lectures will show you how to effectively deal with conflicts of all kinds, using the "win-win" model that has dominated the field for the past six decades.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Frameworks

  • By Brendan on 09-21-13

so boring.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-15

I found this book to be incredibly rudimentary, like I was being taught principles I learned in high school. he spends a lot of time giving irrelevant history lessons that just aren't very useful.

6 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • An Altar in the World

  • A Geography of Faith
  • By: Barbara Brown Taylor
  • Narrated by: Barbara Brown Taylor
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 256
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 214
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 214

From simple practices such as walking, working, and getting lost to deep meditations on topics like prayer and pronouncing blessings, Taylor reveals concrete ways to discover the sacred in the small things we do and see. Something as ordinary as hanging clothes on a clothesline becomes an act of devotion if we pay attention to what we are doing and take time to attend to the sights, smells, and sounds around us. Making eye contact with the cashier at the grocery store becomes a moment of true human connection.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sorry Audible.

  • By Evert on 07-19-13

Vulnerable, honest, dark, loving, kind.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-05-15

Brown doesn't tell you the truth. She takes you through her grappling with the questions. Anyone who's questioned the Bible because of its chauvinist, violent, dogmatic, or otherwise inaccessible qualities will do well to read this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful