LISTENER

Donald F. Kochersberger

Albuquerque, NM United States
  • 3
  • reviews
  • 46
  • helpful votes
  • 237
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  • The Ends of the World

  • Volcanic Apocalypses, Lethal Oceans, and Our Quest to Understand Earth's Past Mass Extinctions
  • By: Peter Brannen
  • Narrated by: Adam Verner
  • Length: 9 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 991
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 903
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 900

Our world has ended five times: It has been broiled, frozen, poison gassed, smothered, and pelted by asteroids. In The Ends of the World, Peter Brannen dives into deep time, exploring Earth's past dead ends, and in the process offers us a glimpse of our possible future. Many scientists now believe that the climate shifts of the 21st century have analogs in these five extinctions.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Kid's Science Book FOR ADULTS!!

  • By aaron on 06-15-17

Climate change

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-19

While there is a tremendous amount of very interesting material, a significant portion is spent on climate change doomsday forecasting. This was unexpected, but perhaps I just didn't read the description and/or reviews closely enough. Anyway, be aware that you will have to wade through quite a bit of "man, are we stupid" monologs. Even with that being said, I listened to the whole thing, so that has to count for something significant!

46 of 57 people found this review helpful

  • Get Well Soon

  • History's Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them
  • By: Jennifer Wright
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,643
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,175

In 1518, in a small town in Alsace, Frau Troffea began dancing and didn't stop. She danced until she was carried away six days later, and soon 34 more villagers joined her. Then more. In a month more than 400 people had been stricken by the mysterious dancing plague. In late-19th-century England an eccentric gentleman founded the No Nose Club in his gracious townhome - a social club for those who had lost their noses, and other body parts, to the plague of syphilis for which there was then no cure.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Didn't know syphilis could be so fascinating.

  • By Carrie Arnold on 02-09-17

Historical content was fascinating, could do without the preaching

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-18

The content of the book was fascinating and the author's sense of humor was sharp. I definitely recommend this book! But...
My only complaint would be the many instances of scorn and judgment the author felt compelled to heap on the failings of numerous characters in this tale. It is exceedingly simple to look at the past from our vantage point and dictate how these events "should have" unfolded if only our modern (and implicitly superior) senses were employed, instead of those of people who must have been fools and/or evil doers. To be sure, there were many in these annals that behaved in ways I would not have preferred. But, as an historian, I would expect the author to take better care to describe the competing pressures causing these behaviors. And, perhaps, spare the scorn and judgment for a more academic approach. Unfortunately, it is seemingly not the way things are done in the current culture of virtue-signaling...

  • Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy

  • By: Tim Harford
  • Narrated by: Roger Davis
  • Length: 9 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 201
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 171
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 170

Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy paints an epic picture of change in an intimate way by telling the stories of the tools, people, and ideas that had far-reaching consequences for all of us. From the plough to artificial intelligence, from Gillette's disposable razor to IKEA's Billy bookcase, best-selling author and Financial Times columnist Tim Harford recounts each invention's own curious, surprising, and memorable story.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Socialist propaganda, slickly done.

  • By Chandler Bridges on 04-17-19

Great book - odd narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-17

The content is an extremely interesting group of summaries tracking the author's estimation of history's most important inventions, some obvious and many not so much. I am sure we can all quibble with his choices to one extent or another, but it is as good of a list as any other I have read.
But, the narrator's choice of accent when reading quotations is distracting in its lack of any apparent authenticity. It is not enough to ruin the experience or anything; it's just very noticeable. At first I thought he was just ridiculing the particular speaker, but the accent seems applied to everyone quoted. It is like an odd amalgamation of an old time radio voice, Jimmy Stewart and a foreigners' impression of a southern American. Please just... Stop. To be fair though, when he is not suffering from this quirk, the reading was very well performed.