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itinerant

  • 198
  • reviews
  • 357
  • helpful votes
  • 407
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  • The Forgotten

  • By: David Baldacci
  • Narrated by: Ron McLarty, Orlagh Cassidy
  • Length: 12 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,289
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,400
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,414

Army Special Agent John Puller is the best there is. A combat veteran, Puller is the man the U.S. Army relies on to investigate the toughest crimes facing the nation. Now he has a new case - but this time, the crime is personal: His aunt has been found dead in Paradise, Florida.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really liking PULLER

  • By Diana on 11-30-12

Puller ain’t Reacher

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-18

This book is heavily derivative of Lee Childs’ work, a dim carbon copy of the oversized military man kicking assessment and taking names. The story is a lame string of coincidences strung together like mismatched Cmas lights blinking erratically on a threadbare tree. Gratuitous sex, gratuitous military nonsense, none of the peculiarly logical underpinnings of the Reacher books. I finished this book to be polite.

  • The Excoms

  • By: Brett Battles
  • Narrated by: Allyson Johnson
  • Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 358
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 337
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 337

Ananke thought her week couldn't get worse, but as she hunts for the man who screwed up her previous job, things really go sideways. Turns out, she's not the only one having problems. Rosario can acquire anything for anyone, but can she obtain freedom for herself when her latest assignment goes awry? Dylan's sure his new gig will be a walk in the park - or rather, a drive, given that he's a courier. Unfortunately, the road is a bit bumpier than he expected.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another very entertaining Brett Battles series

  • By shelley on 01-14-17

oh, come on, Brett

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

I like this book. Battles tells a good yarn, and things move along at a nice clip. Derring-dos are done.

I thought I was going to like this book as it got started because of the setting: Yosemite, tioga Pass, the Eastern Sierra. Where I live, my stomping grounds, and one of the most dramatic and beautiful places on earth.

But to read this book, you would never suspect that any of these locations was anything more than a name on a map. The characters don't observe anything about their setting; though they drive a great deal on very real roads, no one seems to notice that they've just descended or ascended several thousand feet of narrow, winding, steep tortuous road though unbelievably dramatic landscape, the kind postcards and harrowing tales of survival rely upon.

Either Battles has in fact never been to these places where he set his story, or he listened to some editor who told him to remove all evidence that the setting is important to a book set in known and loved and well-traveled places. The book could as well have been set in Iowa or Kansas or Illinois, or Any of flyoverland anywhere.

That's a real problem.

  • Desolation Mountain

  • By: William Kent Krueger
  • Narrated by: David Chandler
  • Length: 9 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 410
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 381
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 380

New York Times best-selling author William Kent Krueger delivers yet another "punch-to-the-gut blend of detective story and investigative fiction" (Booklist) as Cork O'Connor and his son Stephen work together to uncover the truth behind the tragic plane crash of a senator on Desolation Mountain and the mysterious disappearances of several first responders. This is a heart-pounding and devastating mystery the scope and consequences of which go far beyond what father or son could ever have imagined....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • trying again

  • By itinerant on 08-29-18

trying again

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

I've read most of these, despite having sworn off reading any more some time ago. There's too much reliance on characters whose motivations are obscure and their opposition to good sense utterly obdurate and wrongheaded. On the other side are sensitive new-age more-or-less Native Americans. The setting is good, the writing is good (if bipolar, as above), the characters are engaging, the conflicts not real but certainly based on topical trends. I like the heart of these books, though I resist their simplism and dualities. But I guess I'll keep reading them.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Sinners

  • By: Ace Atkins
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 10 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 57
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56

The Pritchards had never been worth a damn - an evil, greedy family who made their living dealing drugs and committing mayhem. Years ago, Colson's late uncle had put the clan's patriarch in prison, but now he's getting out, with revenge, power, and family business on his mind. To make matters worse, a shady trucking firm with possible ties to the Gulf Coast syndicate has moved into Tibbehah, and they have their own methods of intimidation.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the best of this series

  • By Robert Stirling on 07-27-18

few surprises

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

The book relies on everyone's favorite stereotypically stupid and venal characters from the deep south. As such, they're well-presented and act as one might well imagine. The story is engaging enough, and the reader is good at doing accents of stupid, inbred redneck hick southerners . . . but wouldn't it be nice if these weren't the basis for the drama?

  • Hard Dog to Kill

  • By: Craig Holt
  • Narrated by: Tom Fria
  • Length: 10 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 4

Stan Mullens is an American mercenary in the Congo who sees himself as a good guy with a bad job. Stan's self-assigned mission to protect his long time brother-in-arms, Frank, takes a serious hit when their boss sends them on an unsupported mission into the jungle to track and kill Tonde Chiora, a former company employee accused of stealing vital company mining technology. As their mission takes them deep into the violent heart of the Congo, Stan soon discovers that his victim hasn't done anything to warrant being murdered.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Great writing, atrocious production

  • By Jeff & Sabrena on 08-30-18

ineptly read and recorded

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

Too many editorial glitches to be readable--re-read lines, lines run together without spaces, mispronounced (simple) words, all things that ruin the illusion.

The story has some promise, but it, too, runs into problems. The protagonists are despicable and unreliable and apparently innocent of their role as tools of colonialists.

A lot of good material squandered.

  • The Council of Twelve

  • A Hangman’s Daughter Tale
  • By: Oliver Pötzsch, Lisa Reinhardt - translator
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 18 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 284
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 247
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 248

The year is 1672. Hangman Jakob Kuisl and his family travel to Munich, the cosmopolitan heart of Bavaria, for a meeting of the prestigious Council of Twelve, the leaders of the empire’s hangmen’s guild - prestigious for dishonourable hangmen at least. But something dark is happening behind the scenes: in the past weeks, young women have begun turning up dead. At first the authorities assume they are a rash of suicides, but when Kuisl notices that each woman possesses a matching amulet, suspicions arise that someone is murdering them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • great seventh book in series

  • By E. Howland on 06-17-18

The book flaters near the end

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-29-18

I bought this because it's a long book, and I have hours to kill and the need for narrative And for the most part the book met my expectations: an interesting 17th-century world (I didn't read any of the earlier books, but jumped in on this one, and didn't feel that this was a problem), and a horrifying mystery and characters baffled but determined to solve it.
But then things started getting a bit silly, and the exposition a bit clunkier, until, with two hours left to go, the book veered into Hardy Boys Mystery territory, replete with a cave full of bad guys describing in detail all the nefarious aspects of their plot to each other as though for the benefit of the eavesdroppers, while at the same time the entire cast of characters has by some chance ended up in the same place, and so on and so on, as though the author stopped taking the story seriously, just wanted to end it, and assumed if anyone had read this far they would feel the same way and go along with it.
So it starts well, but appears to fizzle out entirely at the end. A major disappointment.

  • High White Sun

  • By: J. Todd Scott
  • Narrated by: T. Ryder Smith
  • Length: 13 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 25

In the wake of Sheriff Stanford Ross' death, former deputy Chris Cherry - now Sheriff Cherry - is the new "law" in Big Bend County, yet still struggling to escape the long, dark shadow of that infamous lawman. As Chris tries to remake and modernize his corrupt department, bringing in new deputies like young America Reynosa and Ben Harper - a hard-edged, veteran homicide detective now lured out of retirement - Chris finds himself constantly staring down a town unwilling to change.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great, loved it as much as the "The Far Empty!

  • By Brenda K Turner on 08-17-18

reader baffled by simple words

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-29-18

I listened to this book on the strength of the first one--in both cases, a good setting, interesting characters, a lot of skulduggery in a small town, decent pacing and a narrative twisty enough to be interesting but not so much as to lose me. I recommend it.
And the reader has a good voice and intonation, for the most part, but among the misses are many jarring moments that fling the listener (me, that is) out of the action to be focused on the mysteries of how an apparently literate person can be so unfamiliar with such basic words. The Spanish pronunciation is hit or miss--if he can pronounce some of the words correctly, why not all of them? These are basic Spanish words and phrases, and it's the easiest language to pronounce . . . but he seems to improvise each word in hopes he gets it right, without learning the fundamentals of hte alphabet.
Worse yet, though, is the reader's apparent unfamiliarity with many common words, words used to describe the setting, for example. His bungled reading of "butte" nearly made me send the book back, even though I wanted to hear what happened next. I mean, come on. ReallY?

  • Stay Hidden

  • By: Paul Doiron
  • Narrated by: Henry Leyva
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 180
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 179

A woman has been shot to death by a deer hunter on an island off the coast of Maine. To newly promoted Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch, the case seems open and shut. But as soon as he arrives on remote Maquoit Island he discovers mysteries piling up one on top of the other. The hunter now claims he didn’t fire the fatal shot and the ballistic evidence proves he’s telling the truth. Bowditch begins to suspect the secretive community might be covering up the identity of whoever killed Ariel Evans.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another riveting story from Maine's mystery master

  • By Nancy Marshall on 07-03-18

Mainiacal

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-18

The first time the guy mispronounced Nt Desert Island, I almost threw the book across the room (metaphorically). But I stuck with it and got around the failed dialect and was pleasantly surprised by some of the unexpected turns the narrative took. The tourist island seems a bit more dysfunctional than necesar, but it makes for a good story.

  • The Big Sheep

  • A Novel
  • By: Robert Kroese
  • Narrated by: Fred Berman
  • Length: 9 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 422
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 392
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 390

Los Angeles of 2039 is a baffling and bifurcated place. After the Collapse of 2028, a vast section of LA, the Disincorporated Zone, was disowned by the civil authorities and became essentially a third world country within the borders of the city. Navigating the boundaries between DZ and LA proper is a tricky task, and there's no one better suited than eccentric private investigator Erasmus Keane.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Big Sheep unravels into an incredible mystery

  • By Tim Ward on 07-13-16

light motif

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-18

There's really not a lot of substance to this, but it's an entertaining tour de farce nonetheless. Not highbrow entertainment, won't be made into an opera, may have been too long for a graphic novel . . . but nonetheless pretty fun.

  • Paradise Sky

  • By: Joe R. Lansdale
  • Narrated by: Brad Sanders
  • Length: 14 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 238
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 225
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 223

A rollicking novel about Nat Love, an African-American cowboy with a famous nickname: Deadwood Dick. Young Willie is on the run, having fled his small Texas farm when an infamous local landowner murdered his father. A man named Loving takes him in and trains him in the fine arts of shooting, riding, reading, and gardening. When Loving dies, Willie re-christens himself Nat Love, in tribute to his mentor, and heads west.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Rip Roaring Tale

  • By Jean on 02-15-17

yeehaw

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-18

This book was surprisingly good. The protagonist has an interesting past leading to an interesting present and a too-happy ending, but along the way is lots of good stuff. I'm going to check out more things this guy wrote.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful