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Lia

Sutton, Australia
  • 981
  • reviews
  • 8,754
  • helpful votes
  • 1,050
  • ratings
  • A Cure for Madness

  • By: Jodi McIsaac
  • Narrated by: Emily Sutton-Smith
  • Length: 8 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 251
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 236
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 234

Clare Campbell has worked hard to create distance between herself and her troubled family. But when she receives news of her parents' murder, she's forced to return to the quiet town of Clarkeston, Maine, to arrange their funeral and take legal guardianship of her unpredictable and mentally ill brother, Wes. While Clare struggles to come to grips with the death of her parents, a terrifying pathogen outbreak overtakes the town.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • frighteningly plausible

  • By Janet Hardesty on 11-12-17

3.5 Stars Because Of The Ending

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-26-19

This book had me engaged until the end. However, the end was vague and questionable. There's no indication that this is the first book in a series so I'm frustrated. It captured me on plot, the main characters, and the medical thriller plot. I kept listening more and more wanting to know what happens. So why 3.5 stars? The ending, in my opinion, was a huge let-down and it was almost as if the author just stopped. There is a twist at the end with the main character. And suddenly, as if magic, the medical emergency that quarantined a whole city, is gone. Fixed. Everyone is fine. I just felt cheated about that. Deflated.

So in summary, this is a fun book but don't expect to know what actually happens at the end.
Emily Sutton-Smith was amazing with the delivery of the story

  • Dead Man's Rule

  • By: Rick Acker
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 38

Chicago lawyer Ben Corbin has just launched his private practice when Dr. Mikhail Ivanovsky, a mysterious Russian scientist, hires him to sue for possession of a safe deposit box. But when the box's owner enlists the city's highest-powered lawyer - and then turns up dead - the Russian confesses: inside the box is an old Soviet biowarfare formula for the deadliest disease known to humankind.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Christian Medical and Legal Thriller

  • By Lisa B. on 03-31-18

Fantastic Book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-19

It's easy to think a novel like this one might bury you with legal language and dry jurisprudence. But don't be fooled by this novel's start. Rick Acker's Dead Man's Rule begins as the story of a litigation lawyer, Ben Corbin, taking on a somewhat hapless property dispute case involving a retired, eccentric Russian scientist, Dr. Mikhail Ivanovsky, and some other Russian ex-pats. But Dead Man's Rule is one legal thriller that packs a serious concealed-carry punch. As the story unfolds, Corbin finds himself dragged into a drama of international intrigue involving the Russian Mafiya, Chechen Islamo-terrorists and one of the Cold War's most dangerous bio-terror creations, the fabled Soviet Ebolapox Virus. It's a fantastic read. The Chicago Russian immigrant community setting is unique and well done. The Russian-American private detective, Sergei Spassky, is a great character. I liked all the characters, although I hope Ben Corbin is a little more developed in the sequel. I just finished Sharon Gilbert's new book, Ebola and the Fourth Horseman of the Apocalypse, which goes into considerable detail about Ebolapox, a lab created virus combining the DNA of Ebola and Smallpox. I had no idea Dead Man's Rule was about the same virus. While Dead Man's Rule is a work of fiction, it's based on scenarios developed by the DOD and Homeland Security. Frightening scenarios. Get this book.

Christopher Lane was excellent with the delivery of the story

  • Damage Control

  • By: Robert Dugoni
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 10 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 577
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 516
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 513

A rising star at her prestigious Seattle law firm, Dana Hill knows all about stress. She pours herself into her work and family with all the energy she has. But her carefully balanced life is about to be turned upside down. First a frightening medical diagnosis forces her to reassess her roles as a lawyer, mother, and wife to a man she suddenly no longer trusts. Then her life is rocked further by the shocking and brutal murder of her twin brother.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Better than average mystery/thriller

  • By T. McCloskey on 10-08-15

Fabulous Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-19

Really enjoy listening to this author and this was a really good stand alone novel (not part of the Crosswhite or Sloane series). A couple of twists at the end I didn’t see coming. Only thing I didn’t buy into was her just ditching work for 1-2 weeks with no call or explanation. When a family member dies, a leave of absence from work is not a big deal in my line of work, but maybe it is for lawyers. Overall good plot and pacing and tension were excellent, so would definitely recommend.

Christopher Lane was excellent with the delivery of the story

  • The Girl from Home

  • By: Adam Mitzner
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Walker
  • Length: 10 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 625
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 573
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 572

Jonathan Caine is a true master of the universe - a currency wizard with a trophy wife, a penthouse condo with a view of the Statue of Liberty, and the desire for more - when his world comes crashing down, spiraling him into a relentless fall from grace. Devastated, Jonathan returns to his hometown to care for his ailing father and attend his 25th high school reunion, where he becomes reacquainted with former prom queen Jacqueline Williams. Back in the day, Jackie didn't even know Jonathan existed.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Wanted to like it

  • By Ashley on 04-13-16

An emotional, and suspenseful thriller!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-19

This book was a great listen for the most part. The story is gripping and builds tension throughout. The end felt rushed after fleshing out characters throughout the story, I was left with an incomplete feeling. Perhaps there will be a sequel, otherwise, the listener will be left feeling a bit robbed.
During a twenty-five year class reunion, Jonathan reunites with Jackie, an old classmate. They were from different cliques. Jonathan the nerd. Jackie the Prom Queen who --in typical cliche fashion-- married Rick, the high school football star. Jackie's in an abusive relationship. No way out. Rick has made it abundantly clear that if she tries leaving him he will kill her. She has more to think about than herself. Their two kids are equally at risk should she try anything stupid, like divorce.

When Rick is murdered, both Jackie and Jonathan are the prime suspects. They both know the truth. But will they keep the secret from the prosecutors, or turn on each other to get a deal from the District Attorney?

Jonathan Walker was excellent with the delivery of the story

  • A Case of Redemption

  • By: Adam Mitzner
  • Narrated by: Kevin T. Collins
  • Length: 10 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,943
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,591
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,616

A high-profile attorney in the middle of a leave of absence following a personal tragedy is drawn back into the legal arena amidst a media firestorm when he agrees to represent a popular rap artist accused of brutally murdering his pop star girlfriend. With its powerful voice, pause-resisting tension, and strong cast of characters, Adam Mitzner’s novels are reminiscent of such best-selling authors as Scott Turow and John Grisham.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By cristina on 05-20-13

Too Many Gaps

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-19

This started out as a pretty good yarn, but Mr. Mitzner fouled me out with the New Year's Eve episode. It was such a dramatic change of character for the female attorney (I've already forgotten her name), and so very unnecessary to the story. The two lawyers just accept the rebuff from "Nuts; they don't even think of the subpoena thing with him; they do not check with the housekeeper about changing linens; they do not attempt to locate Roxanne's spa person which I think should have been fairly easy; they never attempt to find a witness who might corroborate L.D.'s alibi; and we are not presented with anyone other than L.D. and Brooks as possible murderers. We never do find out what happened to the baseball bat.Then ending was just silly and too far fetched to be believable.

Kevin T. Collins was excellent with the delivery of the story and the main reason I finished the book

  • Golden Prey

  • Lucas Davenport, Book 27
  • By: John Sandford
  • Narrated by: Richard Ferrone
  • Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6

A drug-cartel counting house gets robbed in Biloxi, Mississippi, and suitcases full of cash disappear, leaving behind five bodies, including that of a six-year-old girl. Davenport takes the case, which quickly spirals out of control, as cartel assassins compete with Davenport to find the Dixie Hicks shooters who knocked over the counting house. Things get ugly real fast, and neither the cartel killers nor the holdup men give a damn about whose lives Davenport might have saved; to them, he's just another large target.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Least Favourite Of The Series

  • By Lia on 06-14-19

Least Favourite Of The Series

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-19

Meh. I like the Davenport novels, but this isn't one of the good ones.

As many have pointed out, it's pure chase--nobody has to do any serious detecting or thinking. In addition, it's got the techno find because the GPS function on cell phones pretty much keeps the bad guys in Davenport's sight. The other cops that Davenport teams up with are pretty flat and wooden.

And Sandford's sense of place and the site of the big shootout is confusing at best. I defy anyone to visualize or draw me a map of where the shootout takes place or what the arrangement of buildings there actually look like. Sandford must be working from a map or a set of photos, but he certainly can't relate those to us in any helpful way. The layout of the shootout is the real mystery here, and it's annoying as hell.

Finally, the plot device where Davenport calls his contact in the Marshall's Service whenever he needs to find out where the bad guys are seems like a cop-out (pun intended). I think Sandford has written much better books than this. I got so bored with the chase thing I opted out with an 1.30 hours to go.

Richard Ferrone was excellent with the delivery of the story

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Looking Good Dead

  • Roy Grace, Book 2
  • By: Peter James
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe
  • Length: 14 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 152
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 135
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 135

One single act of kindness becomes an endless reign of terror...Tom Bryce did what any decent person would do. But within hours of picking up the CD that had been left behind on the train seat next to him, and attempting to return it to its owner, he is the sole witness to a vicious murder. Then his young family are threatened with their lives if he goes to the police. But supported by his wife, Kellie, he bravely makes a statement to the murder enquiry team headed by Detective Superintendent Roy Grace, a man with demons of his own to contend with.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable but questionable policing techniques

  • By scott on 06-27-16

Great Book - Leaves You Wanting More

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-19

Excellent listen. Great story with twists that are slightly gruesome but in a way you want to keep reading to find out what happens. Only complaint is there is some fluff dialogue in the chapters. As I listen to the books in order I am enjoying the growth and emergence of main character, Roy Grace. You find yourself feeling empathetic and connecting with the character. Makes you want to read the next one.

David Thorpe was outstanding with the delivery of the story

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Hearts of Resistance

  • By: Soraya M. Lane
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Knowelden
  • Length: 10 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 998
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 932
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 928

When Hazel is given the chance to parachute into Nazi-occupied France, she seizes the opportunity to do more for the British war effort than file paperwork. Alongside her childhood friend, French-born Rose, she quickly rises up the ranks of the freedom fighters. For Rose, the Resistance is a link to her late husband, and a way to move forward without him. What starts out as helping downed airmen becomes a bigger cause when they meet Sophia, a German escapee and fierce critic of Hitler who is wanted by the Gestapo.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Grabbed my attention and held it

  • By perrolovr on 04-24-18

Fiction - but based on real life stories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-19

I really had a hard time putting this book down. Three courageous young women in a time when women were to be wives and mothers, went to war. The pace was fast and the tension never let up as you lived the fear and terror of waiting for the Gestapo at the door. The book felt very realistic, frightening and gritty. The characters were very real and you really learned to care for them even as the war changed and hardened them. The ending was a bit romanticised but overall I loved this book. It was a nice change from most women's literature and I think men would appreciate it too.

Elizabeth Knowelden was outstanding with the delivery of the story

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Special Circumstances

  • Mike Daley/Rosie Fernandez Legal Thriller, Book 1
  • By: Sheldon Siegel
  • Narrated by: Tim Campbell
  • Length: 12 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,256
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,144
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,140

Meet Mike Daley. Ex-priest. Ex-public defender. And as of yesterday, ex-partner in one of San Francisco's most prominent law firms. Today he's out on his own, setting up practice on the wrong side of town. Then his best friend and former colleague is charged with a brutal double murder, and Daley is instantly catapulted into a high-profile investigation involving the prestigious law firm that just booted him. As he prepares his case, Daley uncovers the firm's dirtiest secrets.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Just a Really Good Listen

  • By Ted on 06-25-17

Entertaining

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-08-19

This is a very good legal murder mystery. A top earning lawyer,Bob Holmes, is found dead, apparent suicide, along with another lawyer,Diana Kennedy, making it look like murder suicide. But then the new District Attorney,Prentice Marshall Gates III, formerly a lawyer with the same law firm, and the police find evidence suggesting that one of the firm's other lawyers has murdered both people. They arrest Joel Mark Friedman.
He hires Michael Daley, who has been forced to leave the firm.

Daley starts a new law firm with his ex wife, Rosita Carmela Fernandez. He and his ex are very good at trying cases, but lousy at marriage.
There are a lot of twists and turns in the plot. The courtroom scenes are excellent.
The author bio states that he is a corporate lawyer and author of seven books in this series. I give it a solid 4 stars out of 5.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Little Boy Lost

  • By: J. D. Trafford
  • Narrated by: JD Jackson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,113
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 969
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 968

Attorney Justin Glass's practice, housed in a shabby office on the north side of Saint Louis, isn't doing so well that he can afford to work for free. But when eight-year-old Tanisha Walker offers him a jar full of change to find her missing brother, he doesn't have the heart to turn her away. Justin had hoped to find the boy alive and well. But all that was found of Devon Walker was his brutally murdered body - and the bodies of twelve other African American teenagers, all discarded like trash in a mass grave.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding book from new (to me) author...

  • By shelley on 09-27-17

Not A Thriller

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-05-19

This book started with lots of promise. There are lots of five star reviews and I expected to love it, but ultimately I barely managed to get through to the end.

The description and title lead us to believe that the story centers around a murdered child, and, eventually, a group of murdered children. This is true only in the broadest sense. The children are a vague backdrop. We learn little about Devon Walker and pretty much nothing about the other dead boys. These dead children only serve to give the plot a launching point on the topic of racism.

We have several prominent subplots, giving this story a convoluted feel. We spend too much time on the issues of bullying, grief, extramarital affairs, and politics. These subplots distract from, rather than support, the main plot.

We also spend a whole lot of time on a local homeless man's court case that Justin Glass takes on. This case has absolutely nothing to do with the dead boys and, again, only takes focus away from what is supposed to be the main plot.

The issue of racism is the main focus throughout the book. By midway, this becomes too heavy-handed. Parts read much like nonfiction sociology books. The facts are correct and sad, and it's indeed a topic that needs to be discussed, but the writing feels preachy. Ironically, the author inadvertently ignores the dead boys in his effort to show that racism is responsible for everyone else ignoring the dead boys.

In the end, this isn't a thriller or even a crime novel; it's an exposition on racism within the police force and politics. Sadly, this comes at the expense of character and plot development.

JD Jackson was excellent with the delivery of the story and the only reason I finished the book.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful