LISTENER

Lia

Sutton, Australia
  • 916
  • reviews
  • 7,670
  • helpful votes
  • 985
  • ratings
  • A Case of Need

  • A Novel
  • By: Michael Crichton, Jeffery Hudson
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 9 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 454
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 389
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 387

When one doctor is accused of murder, it takes another to set him free. In the tightly knit world of Boston medicine, the Randall family reigns supreme. When heart surgeon J. D. Randall's teenage daughter dies during a botched abortion, the medical community threatens to explode. Was it malpractice? A violation of the Hippocratic Oath? Or was Karen Randall murdered in cold blood?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Classic

  • By r.j. on 07-21-17

Not Mr Cricghton's Best Work

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-18

First, let me say I was a Michael Crichton fan and an avid listener of his later works. Second, I'm glad I never encountered this early work because it might have put me off reading his later and much better works. The constant use of footnotes explaining the medical jargon that permeated the first part of the book was jarring. The book was written in 1968 and is more about abortion than actual detective work. Most definitely not a thriller.

If you're not familiar with Crichton's works, don't let this one discourage you from reading his later works. You'll be missing out on a great writer if you do that.

Nick Podehi was excellent with the delivery of the story

  • Death Benefit

  • An Elliot Lerner Novel
  • By: Ken Isaacson
  • Narrated by: Kyle Tait
  • Length: 12 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15

When the sister of a law firm client dies in her sleep of carbon monoxide poisoning because of an apparently malfunctioning hot water heater, third year law student Elliot Lerner is asked to determine whether anyone could be held responsible in a wrongful death lawsuit. As he looks into the circumstances surrounding the death, he learns about viatical settlements -- investment products designed to provide terminally ill patients with immediate cash in exchange for the right to their life insurance payouts when they die. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hope this is going to be a series...

  • By shelley on 06-30-18

Elliot The Ediot

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-18

This was a very good story that held my interest from start to finish. Worthy of 4-stars if not for the fact that the story is somewhat ruined by the utter density of the wannabe lawyer and protagonist. He has all of these facts regarding the many suspicious deaths, facts that point in a single direction but he's too dense to take them seriously. I guess this will be a series with Mr. Lerner (the central figure in the mystery) obtaining his LLB and passing the bar exam. Let's hope that Mr. Isaacason smartens-up his principle star in further outings. I will listen to the next offering because Mr. Isaacson is a good storyteller.

Kyle Tait was good with the delivery of the story

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Shut Your Eyes Tight

  • By: John Verdon
  • Narrated by: Jeff Harding
  • Length: 17 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16

When he was the NYPD’s top homicide investigator, Dave Gurney was never comfortable with the label the press gave him: super detective. He was simply a man who, when faced with a puzzle, wanted to know. He was called to the investigative hunt by the presumptuous arrogance of murderers - by their smug belief that they could kill without leaving a trace. There was always a trace, Gurney believed. Except what if one day there wasn't?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Puzzler

  • By Lia on 09-07-18

The Puzzler

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-07-18

Dave Gurney, a highly touted NYPD homicide detective, decides after 20 years it is time to retire to a farmhouse in Upstate New York and lead the quiet life which delights his wife Madeline. Two years have gone by and Gurney finds This personal life totally dysfunctional on all levels and knows that he misses the rush of solving difficult murder cases
So when an opportunity is to presented to him to consult on the grisly murder of a young bride who is beheaded on her wedding day he cannot resist knowing that it will have a serious impact on his marriage.

So begins a most sordid story with many twists,turns and unanswered puzzles that requires the reader to really become engrossed in the plot. There are so many treads that it is hard to imagine how it will comes together. This book is full of sexual depravity and brutality but having said that it is an excellent book. How will Gurney solve the case? Will his personal life survive? Listen this excellent book and find out!!!

  • The First Family

  • By: Michael Palmer, Daniel Palmer
  • Narrated by: Fred Berman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 573
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 513
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 512

When President Geoffrey Hilliard’s son Cam, a 16-year-old chess champion, experiences extreme fatigue, moodiness, and an uncharacteristic violent outburst, doctors are quick to dismiss his troubles as teen angst. But Secret Service agent Karen Ray summons her physician ex-husband for a second opinion. Dr. Lee Blackwood’s concerns are dismissed by the president's team - until Cam gets sicker. Lee must make a diagnosis from a puzzling array of symptoms he's never seen before. His only clue is a patient named Susie Banks, a young musical prodigy who seems to be suffering from the same baffling condition as Cam.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good book

  • By Ex-Silicon Valley Girl on 04-21-18

Great Medical/PoliticalThriller

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-18

Any medical mystery written by Daniel Palmer in conjunction with his famous dad, Michael Palmer; who left us way too soon; is bound to be one of those books that you won't get very done until you're finished. And then you wish there was more!
In my reviews , I don't rehash the book, give away spoilers , just give you my honest opinion as to whether it was worth my time to read and up the author's usual expectations . And in this case , as are all of Danel/Michael Palmer, it most definitely is!

Fred Berman was excellent with the delivery of the story

  • The Last Trial

  • McMurtrie and Drake Legal Thrillers
  • By: Robert Bailey
  • Narrated by: Eric G. Dove
  • Length: 11 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 485
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 440
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 432

McMurtrie’s old nemesis, Jack Willistone, is found dead on the banks of the Black Warrior River. Willistone had his share of enemies, but all evidence points to a forgotten, broken woman as the killer. At the urging of the suspect’s desperate fourteen-year-old daughter, McMurtrie agrees to take the case. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely one of the best legal thrillers!!

  • By shelley on 05-09-18

Great Legal Thriller

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-18

This is an interesting and suspenseful story, with enough clues to solve the mystery, but just enough misdirection to make the ending a surprise. The characters are well developed, and it made me hope that McMurtrie will still be around to attend one more "last trial".

One thing I noticed is that the story reads like an extended "product placement" ad. No one gets into their car, they get into their Toyota Camry or their Tundra truck. Or they wear an UnderArmor t shirt. Or Nike tennis shoes. Well ok, eventually one "product" becomes important in solving the who-done-it. Maybe it has to be done that way to allow the clues to work. Nevertheless, it caught my attention while listening the novel. A bit sad but still a really good listen.

Eric G. Dove was wonderful with the delivery of the story

  • The Lullaby Girl

  • Angie Pallorino, Book 2
  • By: Loreth Anne White
  • Narrated by: Julie McKay
  • Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,012
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 924
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 920

Detective Angie Pallorino took down a serial killer permanently and, according to her superiors, with excessive force. Benched on a desk assignment for twelve months, Angie struggles to maintain her sense of identity - if she's not a detective, who is she? Then a decades-old cold case washes ashore, pulling her into an investigation she recognizes as deeply personal.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • WOW! The intensity is palpable!

  • By Wayne on 11-20-17

Great Installment To The Series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-18

From the very first page The Lullaby Girl sucked me right into Angie Pallorino’s hunt for who she is. After the stunning revelation of book one, she is on the hunt for her heritage, and it is a very dark one. I really liked this book and I love the characters, but at the same time I felt rushed in the events leading up to the conclusion. It was far too easy for Angie to find out who she was, and I wish the hunt would have been more cat and mouse like the first book. Also the author splitting up Maddox and Pallorino story-lines took the book in another direction as they are better together than apart. There were a few loose ends that were not tied up, one being the killer of several people and the American client. I’m hoping White ties up these loose ends in the next book.
Over all a great series and I can’t wait for the next book.

Julie McKay was outstanding with the delivery of the story

  • Bleed for Me

  • By: Michael Robotham
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 128
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105

When Sienna Hegarty turns up at his family home one night, covered in blood and frozen in shock, psychologist Joe O'Loughlin finds himself drawn deep into her world, trying to unearth the dark secrets her mind has buried. The police find a major piece of the puzzle at Sienna’s house: her father, a retired cop, is face-down in a pool of his own blood, his throat slashed and his skull caved in. The blood covering Sienna was his.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect Combination

  • By Anniebligh on 01-14-12

Another Great Installment To The Series

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-18

I discovered the Joseph O'Loughlin series when I received a daily e-mail regarding bargain Kindle books. It was for the fourth book by Michael Robotham, Shatter. I have now gone back and read the first book, Suspect; the second book, Lost, the third book (which really isn't about Joe), The Night Freight. All were good books because this author is a fantastic writer. He has a style of writing that holds your interest throughout all of his books. My only suggestion, is that folks might want to read his earlier books before this one. While the books can stand alone, I am recommending to all my friends that they read them in order (maybe skipping The Night Ferry) because once you read one of his books, I think you may just fall in love with his style of writing, like I did. To date, there are 7 books. I have not read the sixth book, The Wreckage, yet (because it isn't about Joe either), but I have read his latest "Say You're Sorry". I truly enjoyed all six books. and am looking forward to reading more of his books in this series.

  • The Listener

  • By: Robert McCammon
  • Narrated by: Marc Vietor
  • Length: 10 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,104
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,028
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,022

It's 1934. Businesses went under by the hundreds, debt and foreclosures boomed, and breadlines grew in many American cities. In the midst of this misery, some folks explored unscrupulous ways to make money. Angel-faced John Partlow and carnival huckster Ginger LaFrance are among the worst of this lot. Joining together they leave their small-time confidence scams behind to attempt an elaborate kidnapping-for-ransom scheme in New Orleans.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Southern Fried Horror Done Right

  • By Ila in Maine on 03-05-18

Lots Of Potential

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-21-18

I admire the heck out of Robert McCammon and have repeatedly gone on record opining he's one of the most underrated writers of his generation. I still stand by that, but have to say, for me, this newest offering is just kind of ... okay.

It's well-written, make no mistake. It has the genuine immersive feel and detail McCammon brings to his historical fiction (if maybe somewhat overly cautious when touching on the racial issues and ugliness of the era). The characters are interesting and seem like real people, the story's solid enough. It's just missing the full depth and punch and wow factor I've come to expect.

I guess I just wanted more from this book. I wanted more backstory on the kidnappers, I wanted more conflict and tension and resolution. I wanted more than the slightly wince-worthy 'magical Negro' trope, while at the same time I wanted to know and see more of his abilities, wanted more pro-activity.

Maybe I'm just greedy and spoiled when it comes to my favorite authors; I expected so much more. Wasn't a waste of my listening time or anything like that. Just wasn't what I think it could and should have been.

Marc Vietor was outstanding with the delivery of the story and made the book enjoyable for me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • 24: Deadline

  • By: James Swallow
  • Narrated by: Fred Berman
  • Length: 10 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 85
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 77

The time is 5:00 PM. One hour ago, federal agent Jack Bauer was declared a fugitive. If he wants to survive, he must get out of the country, and he doesn’t have much time. With his former colleagues in the Counter Terrorist Unit now dead, under arrest, or shut down, Jack has no resources to call upon, no back-up, and nowhere to go - only his determination can drive him on.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Jack is not to be messed with!

  • By Weaponmaster on 08-09-15

Action A Plenty

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-20-18

This was a great filler to help with the absence of Jack Bauer. It definitely felt like a 24 book, though the danger was more centralized to Jack instead of the global scale 24 fans are used to seeing. I did like how it took over right after the events of Season 8 and pulled in some characters from the show. Reading about some of 24's favorite characters made me reminisce and brought on that same nostalgic feeling I get when reading the 24 novels. It actually made me want to re-watch Season 8 to remember more clearly how it ended. In this book, Jack is on his way to saying goodbye to Kim and he has both the FBI and the Russians searching for him. He calls up and old friend to help him out and the action doesn't seem to cease. You definitely can feel the angst Bauer is feeling, and it definitely picks up flawlessly where Season 8 ended. The progression of the story definitely seems logical, and fits with the rest of the story-line. I am not sure I would have liked it as much if I had not been familiar enough with the characters beforehand, however. I feel that it would have been too confusing if that were the case. However, since I am familiar, it really was an enjoyable read, and definitely gets me interested in reading more in the series.

  • Departure

  • By: A.G. Riddle
  • Narrated by: Nicola Barber, Scott Aiello
  • Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,126
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,614
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,592

En route to London from New York, Flight 305 suddenly loses power and crash-lands in the English countryside, plunging a group of strangers into a mysterious adventure that will have repercussions for all of humankind. Struggling to stay alive, the survivors soon realize that the world they've crashed in is very different from the one they left. But where are they? Why are they here? And how will they get back home?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Sci-Fi Story With Lots of Twists and Turns

  • By Cheri on 09-01-15

Ridiculous, Boring and Flat

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-18-18

Nick Stone and Harper Lane have never met. He’s a successful venture capitalist. She’s a successful ghost writer. The one thing that they have in common is that they are on the same transatlantic flight, which crash-lands in a lake in a rural part of England. Some passengers die on impact. Some drown. Some survive only to grow old and succumb to old age within days. All of this tragedy happens via narrator monotone without any feeling or depth.

At first Riddle’s novel feels like a knock-off of the TV series, Lost, as Nick and Harper make their way through this alternate reality in which they find themselves. The reader’s experience mimics that of the protagonists, both finding that they are in a quandary, succinctly noted by Harper herself at one point: “Stand-alone novel? Sci-fi? Thriller? Time travel?” Eventually, the author pulls back enough of the curtain that we figure it out. (So do Nick and Harper.)

The story does have, in this reviewer’s opinion, a very distracting element in its telling. As the narratortakes in the adventure, he or she must do it simultaneously from two different points of view: Riddle has chosen to write this book in first-person-present tense – but from two different characters. In one chapter, we see part of the story directly through Harper’s eyes: “I can only sit, in a daze.” Yet in the next chapter, we see a different part of the story through Nick’s eyes: “They call it the Palm. I call it hell.” Unfortunately, Harper’s and Nick’s voices are nearly identical. If a reader opened a page at random, there would be no way of knowing who doing the “telling” at that moment.

It left me feeling like I have a crook in my neck from watching a tennis match at Wimbledon: back and forth and back and forth… A switch to an omniscient POV would have made the novel much more delightful.

One other weakness in the writing is the fact that there is an excessive amount of boring back story that is delivered to the narrator via monologue – vis-à-vis one character telling another either what is happening in that moment or what has happened in the past. Again, a different choice of POV could have made the reader’s experience more enjoyable.

For readers who don’t mind first-person-present POV, the author’s choice may not be a hindrance. His plot idea is inventive, and his characters are likeable. In the end, we are rooting for them. But it took so long to get to that point it ruined the whole book for me.

Nicola Barber voice was so soft I had to keep adjusting the volume, Scott Aiello voice was great and he should narrated the entire book.