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  • White Fragility

  • Why It's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
  • By: Robin DiAngelo, Michael Eric Dyson - foreword
  • Narrated by: Amy Landon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 647
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 569
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 564

In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to "bad people" (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent meaningful cross-racial dialogue.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good book but...

  • By Amazon Customer on 08-06-18

Positive Solutions in the Divide

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-20-18

Dr. DiAngelo gives readers terminology to deconstruct White Fragility, and she gives readers real world experiences to show how it keeps itself intact. I was impressed with the solutions she posed and how it can lend toward deeper dialogue in modalities of allyship. As a Native American male I learned a great deal about my implicit reinforcement of White Fragility and what I can do to disrupt it. While this book is written for a White audience, I would recommend minorities to read and pass along to their White allies.

P.S. I’m going to covertly place copies of this book around the offices where I work ;)...

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Educated

  • A Memoir
  • By: Tara Westover
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 20,824
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 18,932
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 18,834

Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches. In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father's junkyard. Her father forbade hospitals, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. Then, lacking any formal education, Tara began to educate herself. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Exceptional

  • By Haley on 05-27-18

Redemption Uninformed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-23-18

Great performance by the narrator, which can make all difference for fans of audio books. I gave this a five star across the board. The story itself is a good one, one that will keep you interested throughout. I empathized with Tara’s experience in that I too pulled myself out of poverty via a Master’s Degree. I too felt a sort of liberation and an isolation from the family I grew up with. I experience similar discontent at family reunions and holiday get togethers. It’s hard to return home after you’ve been transformed. Tara does a great job of capturing that experience. It provided great insight, but not into my experiences as “educated,” more toward the family I left behind. I can see now how they look at me as pretentious. The books biggest flaw is it’s self grader. Or Tara’s anyway. And it made me more empathetic to my family and what trauma I potentially bring with coming back home “educated.” In Tara’s rendition of her experience she gets to a point in explaining her education where she starts to sound like her abusive father. She thinks of herself so brilliant she forgets her father and mother’s genetics and hard work gave her the foundation to become who she became. The novel is more interesting in the first half of the book where she has a heart for her environment. Then toward the end she seeks and has her revenge. I can understand being upset at the abuse but she losses her audience when she abuses her father and mother with a relentless fury in the latter half of the book. She didn’t learn to do better. In fact, she continues her father’s saga as her ultimate payback is this book. She is him. Unknowingly so. I thought the end to be sad and her redemption uniformed.

  • The Republic of Wine

  • By: Mo Yan, Howard Goldblatt
  • Narrated by: Louis Changchien
  • Length: 14 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9

In this hypnotic epic novel, Mo Yan, the most critically acclaimed Chinese writer of this generation, takes us on a journey to a conjured province of contemporary China known as the Republic of Wine - a corrupt and hallucinatory world filled with superstitions, gargantuan appetites, and surrealistic events. When rumors reach the authorities that strange and excessive gourmandize is being practiced in the city of Liquorland (so named for the staggering amount of alcohol produced and consumed there), veteran special investigator Ding Gou'er is dispatched from the capital.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • darkly modernistic

  • By Oscar on 03-23-16

darkly modernistic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-16

Disturbing topic but author does a great job of creating an interesting world. Once you enter liquor land you simultaneously want to leave but can't escape. Mo Yan inserts himself and the reader into the storyline with expert craft. There are a few saggy parts toward the end but the characters and thematics keep you involved. One of his better books. Worth reading. You won't look at the world the same after.

  • Life and Death are Wearing Me Out

  • By: Mo Yan, Howard Goldblatt (translator)
  • Narrated by: Feodor Chin
  • Length: 24 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 69
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 63
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 65

Today’s most revered, feared, and controversial Chinese novelist offers a tour de force in which the real, the absurd, the comical, and the tragic are blended into a fascinating narrative. The hero—or antihero—of Mo Yan’s new novel is Ximen Nao, a landowner known for his benevolence to his peasants. His story is a deliriously unique journey and absolutely riveting tale that reveals the author’s love of a homeland beset by ills inevitable, political, and traditional.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Five Flowerings in the era of Communist China

  • By Casey Crede on 06-25-15

The Magnificent Journey

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-15

This is a great journey and well worth the time to listen. The characters are alive in the story and bring insight into your life. It is entertaining as well as thought provoking. I enjoyed this story to the last word. I was sad to see it end.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful