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Darwin8u

Mesa, AZ, United States
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  • The Death of the Banker

  • The Decline and Fall of the Great Financial Dynasties and the Triumph of the Small Investor
  • By: Ron Chernow
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 4 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 527
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 469
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 473

Ron Chernow examines the forces that made dynasties like the Morgans, the Warburgs, and the Rothschilds the financial arbiters of the early twentieth century and then rendered them virtually obsolete by the century's end. As he traces the shifting balance of power among investors, borrowers, and bankers, Chernow evokes both the grand theater of capital and the personal dramas of its most fascinating protagonists.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Severely outdated

  • By Lindsey M Hall on 11-15-17

Bankerdämmerung

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-18

"As we have seen repeatedly in our own day, any successful business that engenders a large surplus is, potentially, an embryonic bank."
- Ron Chernow, The Death of the Banker

A more accurate title might be "Death of Banking", or "The Death of Pimp Merchant Bankers", or perhaps ... "A Chronicle of an Almost Banking Death Foretold Far To0 Early" or "The Democratization of Money and the Rise of Mutual Funds". Interestingly, this book was published in 1997 right before banks enjoyed their CMO/securritization/post Glass–Steagall ressurrection. Everytime someone predicts banking/bankers are about to die, they get bailed-out, patched-up, mutates, and grows again. For this reason, this book hasn't aged well. It missed the biggest story about finance in the last 50 years (the Financial boom and bust of 2007/8).

The first 2/3 of the book is basically a lecture Chernow delivered in Toronto (the Barbara Frum Lecture sponsored by the University of Toronto History Department and the CBC). Chernow added two essays totalling about 45 pages on J.P. Morgan and the Warburgs. These are basically extended summaries of Chernow's earlier Banking Dynasty books: "House of Morgan" and "The Warburgs". Not included (because the book came later) was Chernow's third Banking Dynasty book on the Rockefeller family.

So, it is hard for me to like this as a book. It is a good, if out-dated, essay and summaries of 2/3 books Chernow's banking books I've recently read. I would recommend anyone interested in this topic to simply read Chernow's three banking books. But, if you have read everything else Chernow is published and you want to be a completist because you are kinda/sorta A.D.D., go ahead. You can read it in a couple hours. It is more conversational than his histories and you've heard most of the stories, quotes, and themes before.

Chernow writes primarily about banking families and American biographies:

Chernow's Banking Dynasties:
1. Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. - ★★★★
2. The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance - ★★★★
3. The Warburgs: The Twentieth-Century Odyssey of a Remarkable Jewish Family - ★★★★

Chernow's American Political Biographies:
1. Alexander Hamilton - ★★★★★
2. Washington: A Life - ★★★★★
3. Grant - ★★★★★

Upon reviewing my reviews, I'm convinced Chernow does slightly better at writing histories of individuals rather than families; politics rather than finance. However, I should note, I've enjoyed ALL of his books and he's a master at his craft.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Music

  • A Very Short Introduction
  • By: Nicholas Cook
  • Narrated by: Suzanne Toren
  • Length: 4 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 30
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 17

This very short introduction, written with both humor and flair, begins with a sampling of music as human activity and then goes on to consider the slippery phenomenon of how music has become an object of thought. Covering not only Western and classical music, Cook touches on all types from rock to Indonesian music and beyond. Incorporating musical forms from every continent, Music will make enjoyable reading for beginner and expert alike.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Very academic and dull treatment of topic

  • By James on 05-30-11

An ETUDE in WEE Minor

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-23-18

"But when we speak of music we are really talking about a multiplicity of activities and experiences; it is only the fact that we call them all 'music' that makes it seeem obvious they belong together."
-- Nicholas Cook, Music: VSI

Vol N° 2 of Oxford's Very Short Introductins series.

'Music: A Very Short Introduction' is one of the very first books in Oxford's series. It is both MORE and LESS (not to be confused with more or less) than what I was expecting. It was more of an academic, post-modern, post-colonial, Marxist look at music. Since the Western Canon is the elephant in the room for any discussion of Music, it gets most of the attention, but Cook also spends a lot of time wandering around the idea of Music as cultural system, language, and representation of culture and society. He also explores critical theory, musicology, music theory, and the potential for music as a means of cross-cultural understanding and insight. There was a part of me (the part that will occassionally flirt with Wittgenstein AND John Cage) that enjoyed the academic and cerebral approach to understanding Music.

There was also a part of me that wanted to tightly wrap a brass trumpet around Cook's neck. I don't think these books need to be easy, but part of the issue with academics in many fields is their tendency to write for their own little group (the less of my more AND less). I'm not sure this book would be of interest for many beyond a MUSIC501 (Introducton to Musicology) course at Duke, etc. I guess for me this type of a book, as an amatuer music listener, would be more Schönberg and less Mozart. It is aimed at the few and not the many.

  • The House of Morgan

  • An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance
  • By: Ron Chernow
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 34 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,523
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,341
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,331

A gripping history of banking and the booms and busts that shaped the world on both sides of the Atlantic, The House of Morgan traces the trajectory of the J. P.Morgan empire from its obscure beginnings in Victorian London to the crash of 1987. Ron Chernow paints a fascinating portrait of the private saga of the Morgans and the rarefied world of the American and British elite in which they moved. Based on extensive interviews and access to the family and business archives, The House of Morgan is an investigative masterpiece.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Chernow's first book as good as his later ones

  • By S. Yates on 06-01-17

The construction of the House of Morgan

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-18

"Never before in the history of the world has there been such a powerful central control over finance, industrial production, credit, and wages as it is at this time vested in the Morgan group."
- Former Republican Chairman, quoted in Fortune, August 1933.

Ron Chernow's first financial biography/history is large It is 720 pages, plus notes/etc., and spans 1938 - 1989. It started off strong. Part I: The Baronial Age (1838-1913) is focused on the MEN, namely George Peabody, Junius Spencer Morgan, and J. Pierpont Morgan. The banks were simply extensions of the men. This section was 5-stars. It was fascinating. Part II: The Diplomatic Age (1913 - 1948) is focused on the bank(s). It begins with J.P. Morgan's death follows the House of Morgan through the war years (with "Jack" Morgan shepherding). Towards the end, with Glass-Steagal, the House of Morgan breaks into three major entities: Morgan Grenfell (already separate, English), Morgan Stanley (Investment Banking), and J.P. Morgan & Co. For me this was 4-stars. Part III: The Casino Age (1948-1989) explored the explosion of banking activity post war, the focus on M&A, and the loss of stature of the House of Morgan, both as it lost power and prestige. The book ends before J.P. Morgan was bought by Chase in 1990 (the book was published in 1990). This part was interesting, but like a shotgun, the further from Pierpont you get, the more diffuse the narrative. Eventually, there just seemed too much (too many actors, too many scandals, too many narrative threads). This part probably desereves 3-stars.

All in all, I liked the book. It showed Chernow's early talent for financial storytelling and gift for capturing historical characters. For me, the most valuable part of this book (besides the information on Pierpont) was the information on the other major partners that played a big roll during the wars, and Morgan's relationships with various 19th and 20th century figures (financial, cultural, political). I was fascinated by the deep relationship the House of Morgan had with fascist Italy, ultranationalist Japan, Germany, and the Vatican. I was entranced by Tom Lamont, Monty Norman, Russell Leffingwell, etc. The book was worth the effort just to learn about these other Morgan men.

Chernow writes primarily about banking families and American biographies:

Chernow's Banking Dynasties:
1. Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. - ★★★★
2. The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance - ★★★★
3. The Warburgs: The Twentieth-Century Odyssey of a Remarkable Jewish Family - ★★★★

Chernow's American Political Biographies:
1. Alexander Hamilton - ★★★★★
2. Washington: A Life - ★★★★★
3. Grant - ★★★★★

Upon reviewing my reviews, I'm convinced Chernow does slightly better at writing histories of individuals rather than families; politics rather than finance. However, I should note, I've enjoyed ALL of his books and he's a master at his craft.

  • The Warburgs

  • The Twentieth-Century Odyssey of a Remarkable Jewish Family
  • By: Ron Chernow
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Reese
  • Length: 35 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 207
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 190
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 184

Bankers, philanthropists, scholars, socialites, artists, and politicians, the Warburgs stood at the pinnacle of German (and, later, German American) Jewry. They forged economic dynasties, built mansions and estates, assembled libraries, endowed charities, and advised a German kaiser and two American presidents. But their very success made the Warburgs lightning rods for anti-Semitism, and their sense of patriotism became increasingly dangerous in a Germany that had declared Jews the enemy.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Terrible reader!

  • By Helen R. Cook on 05-08-17

The Warburg's Dynamic Family History

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-18

"It was the Warburg's good fortune that whenever we were about to get very rich something would happen and we became poor and had to start over again."
- Siegmund W. Warburg, quoted in Ron Chernow's 'The Warburgs'

Working in finance, the Warburg name wasn't unknown to me, but it never carried the same cachet as the Rothchilds, the Morgans, the Rockefellers, or the Medicis. Part of this is certainy geography. Being American, I've had more exposure to the myths and the institutions created by the Rockefellers and the Morgans (the Mellons and the Goldman-Sachs). But it was more than that. The Warburg family and banking stretched over multiple generations and dynasties. It also peaked right before the Nazis came into power, so the Warburgs faced a large amount of antisemetism (like almost all European Jews) during the late 19th and first half of the 20th century.

It is bold of Chernow to take on this family history. It is a big thesis. And it is a difficult task to write a compelling family history framed around banking and Germany and Nazis and not create a hot mess of a book. At times, I felt this book was falling into a hot mess. It spread out, banks fractured, families squabbled, and for a couple hundred pages the book was a chore. But, ultimately, Chernow almost pulled it off. I was fascinated by characters like Aby, Max, Paul, Felix and Fritz Warburg (the Mittleweg Warburgs). Sometimes, I felt as if each of the brothers carried a characteristic or passion I could relate to. Most of the attention of the book is spent on brothers who bank (the exception being Aby, the art Historian and rabid book collector), so the sisters while addressed, get a smaller role. Later, as the Warburg banking empire starts to rebuild, attention is spent on cousins Eric, Paul, and James (Mittleweg Warburgs), and Sir Siegmund Warburg (Alsterufer Warburgs). By this time, the Warburg families have spread mostly out of Germany to America, Switzerland, Sweden, the Netherlands, etc. But like with the previous generation of Warburg men, I found characteristics of these dynamic men that I could relate to. They were all different, often difficult and driven, but fascinating.

Chernow writes primarily about banking families and American biographies:

Chernow's Banking Dynasties:
1. Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. - ★★★★
2. The House of Morgan: An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance - ★★★★
3. The Warburgs: The Twentieth-Century Odyssey of a Remarkable Jewish Family - ★★★★

Chernow's American Political Biographies:
1. Alexander Hamilton - ★★★★★
2. Washington: A Life - ★★★★★
3. Grant - ★★★★★

Upon reviewing my reviews, I'm convinced Chernow does slightly better at writing histories of individuals rather than families; politics rather than finance. However, I should note, I've enjoyed ALL of his books and he's a master at his craft.

  • Buddhism

  • A Very Short Introduction
  • By: Damien Keown
  • Narrated by: Coleen Marlo
  • Length: 4 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6

This very short introduction offers listeners a superb overview of the teachings of the Buddha, as well as a succinct guide to the integration of Buddhism into daily life.  

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Engage the services of a Very Short boatman

  • By Darwin8u on 10-22-18

Engage the services of a Very Short boatman

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-18

"...rather than devote years of one's life to learning to walk on water it was simpler to engage the services of a boatman!"
- Buddha, quoted in Damien Keown's Buddhism: VSI

Vol N° 3 of Oxford's Very Short Introductins series.

I've been fascinated with Buddhism for years and for years jokingly called myself a Zen Mormon. Although that probably undersells my relationship with Mormonism and oversells my relationship with Buddhism. I do, however, follow many secular Buddhist practices and read several books on Buddhism every year. I try to meditate, but I'm really, really bad at it. I joke that if I could meditate properly for just one minute, I might at that point achieve Nirvana, or at least begin to float a couple inches over my cushion.

Anyway, I've got several books on Buddhism sitting on my shelf to read, but this year I wanted to read a simple overview of Buddhism. Damien Keown's contribution to Oxford's Very Short Introduction seemed to fit the bill perfectly. It summarizes Buddhism and the Buddha, looks at its history, schools (Mahāyāna, Theravāda, etc.), while also giving an overview of karma, the Four Noble Truths, meditation, ethics, etc. Finally, Keown ends the book discussing Buddhism in the West and the possibilities of development and enlightenment as Buddhism grows in a new field.

Anyway, for a book that is limited to less than 150 pages, Keown did a great job and covered a lot of ground. The limits were Keown necessarily needed to leave unexplored a lot of Buddhist teachings (think bullet points of the main concepts).

  • Norwegian Wood

  • By: Haruki Murakami
  • Narrated by: John Chancer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 829
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 744
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 747

This stunning and elegiac novel by the author of the internationally acclaimed Wind-Up Bird Chronicle has sold over four million copies in Japan and is now available to American audiences for the first time. It is sure to be a literary event.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Beautiful, Wistful...

  • By Douglas on 02-18-16

This Bird Has Flown

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-18

I'm a little conflicted about 'Norwegian Wood.' I love Murakami and I think I get what Murakami was trying to say (at least partially) in this novel. I was just a little too bored and too disinterested to find myself caring about the novel. I finished it, just to have finished it, and kinda felt that Murakami might have felt the same way after writing it. By the end, I was almost begging for some Japanese 'Deus ex Machina' to suddenly appear and rescue me from the plastic bag-like suffocation of the life and death narrative. Ugh.

That all said, perhaps it really is me and not you with this one Murakami.

  • Bunker Hill

  • A City, a Siege, a Revolution
  • By: Nathaniel Philbrick
  • Narrated by: Chris Sorensen
  • Length: 12 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,200
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,079
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,078

Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another Fantastic Story by Philbrick

  • By Rick on 09-30-13

Liberté, piété, prostituées!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-18

"Boston was known for its love of liberty, its piety, and its prostitutes."
- Nathaniel Philbrick, Bunker Hill

I'm an unapologetic fan of Nathaniel Philbrick. I've enjoyed his maritime histories: In the Heart of the Sea, Sea of Glory, Mayflower, etc., but I've also started appreciating his New England histories. Mayflower was actually not just about the Pilgrims and the Mayflower, but was also a solid history of King Philip's War.

Philbrick has moved solidly into the popular (find his books at Costco and Walmart) and award-winning historian category with others like of McCullough, Ellis, and Kearns Goodwin. I haven't read his history of the Little Big Horn yet, but now that I've finished a non-maritime history by Philbrick, I'm completely comfortable that he can write on land as well as on sea.

The book, like his history of the Mayflower, expands beyond the history of the title. The actual history is focused on Boston from 1773 to the evacuation of Bunker Hill in March of 1776, so it includes Lexington & Concord, the Battle of Bunker Hill, the Siege of Boston, and the fortification of Dorchester Heights. My greatest thrill with this book is the focus it give to General Joseph Warren. He, in my opinion, is underappreciated by most Americans for his contributions to the Revoutionary War. If he hadn't died prematurely, he would have easily been ranked up there with Hamilton, Washington, and Jefferson. He was a polymath and amazing.

  • The Spanish Civil War

  • A Very Short Introduction
  • By: Helen Graham
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 5 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48

This Very Short Intoduction integrates the political, social and cultural history of the Spanish Civil War. It sets out the domestic and international context of the war for a general readership. In addition to tracing the course of war, the book locates the war's origins in the cumulative social and cultural anxieties provoked by a process of rapid, uneven and accelerating modernism taking place all over Europe.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very Short Introductions is the best collection!!

  • By Jose on 05-12-11

The Past is another Country

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-18

"You may conquer but you will never convince."
- Miguel de Unamuno, quoted in Helen Graham's The Spanish Civil War: VSI

This subject and project, for me, seems like the perfect realization of the goal of Oxford Press with the VSI. Some subjects just aren't easily made for or summarized in 100-150 pages. And while Graham necessarily left much unsaid in her brief introduction to the Spanish Civil War, she covered a lot of ground and effectively introduced the subject to me.

My past experience with the Spanish Civil War was usually through the literary works of Hemingway, literary reporting of Orwell, or the historical fiction of Alan Furst (Midnight in Europe, etc). Because these are fragments of the story, beyond that I only picked up pieces here and there while reading other historical books on WWII. Graham filled in the gaps perfectly. She went over the events and issues that lead up to the military coup, described the protacted fight between the rebels and the Republic, explained the involvement of Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy, and the difficulties (for the Republic) of the International Non-Interventionist embargo. She also spends an appropriate amount of time on the anti-fascists fighting with the International Brigades. She ends the book with a fascinating chapter on memory and silence in the post-Franco Spain.

The book was moving, well-paced, and wet my appetite to learn more. It also serves as a political and historical parable about how quickly Republican government can be overturned by apathy, aggression, and cultural wars between the haves and have nots, the military and civilian leadership, the church and state, etc., etc.. Fascism is always closer than we would like to think. The Spanish Civil War also serves as a reminder about how differently things might have gone if England and France had stood with the Republic.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Classical Mythology: A Very Short Introduction

  • By: Helen Morales
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 3 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11

From Zeus and Europa, to Diana, Pan, and Prometheus, the myths of ancient Greece and Rome seem to exert a timeless power over us. But what do those myths represent, and why are they so enduringly fascinating? Why do they seem to be such a potent way of talking about ourselves, our origins, and our desires? This imaginative and stimulating Very Short Introduction goes beyond a simple retelling of the stories to explore the rich history and diverse interpretations of classical myths.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Myth-making and myth-makers

  • By Darwin8u on 10-07-18

Myth-making and myth-makers

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-18

"Classical mythology only happens when the stories become active agents; when people use them."
- Helen Morales, VSI Classical Mythology

An interesting take on Classical Mythology. Just like Mary Beard begins and ultimately frames her examination of the Classics for VSI by exploring the British Museum's Bassae room and the Temple of Bassae in Greece, Helen Morales uses Europa on the Bull (on the Euro and on a 3rd Century Roman coin) to BEGIN to examine how myth is used and transformed by cultures, governments, etc., as emblems and powerful statements. While she travels beyond the myth of Zeus (as Bull) and Europa (and beyond governments), she will often return again and again to this myth to explain and illuminate other aspects of classical myths.

In the book Morales looks at the context of Classical myths, Gods and heros, the metaphorphoses of mythology (muthos to logos), she looks at Freud's role in our modern view of Classical Myths (how myth impacted analysis and analysis impacted Classical myths), the sexual politics of myth, and myths and the New Age.

I liked it. I'm always interested how scholars will attempt to tackle the distilation process of VSI. Some cram, some thin, some find creative ways to obliquely tackle and introduce their subjects to amateurs. It is a venture that is (for many subjects) a challenge worthy of a mental Hercules (Heracles).

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Fifth Risk

  • By: Michael Lewis
  • Narrated by: Victor Bevine
  • Length: 5 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,330
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,188
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,181

"The election happened," remembers Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, then deputy secretary of the Department of Energy. "And then there was radio silence." Across all departments, similar stories were playing out: Trump appointees were few and far between; those that did show up were shockingly uninformed about the functions of their new workplace. Some even threw away the briefing books that had been prepared for them. Michael Lewis’ brilliant narrative takes us into the engine rooms of a government under attack by its own leaders.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Awkward and Disappointing

  • By Amit M on 10-04-18

Knowledge makes life messier

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-06-18

"It's the places in our government where the cameras never roll that you have to worry about the most."
- Michael Lewis, The Fifth Risk

I've read several books about President Trump and his administration in the last couple years. They all depress me a bit. I feel like I'm reading some real-time version of Gibbons' 'Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire'. But none of the other Trump books scared me like this one did. Lewis isn't interested in the Fox/MSNBC politics or the Twitter-level anxiety of the Trump administration. He is interested, in this book, in the systematic and bureaucratic failures of the Trump administration and what risks this administration's lack of professionalism (this is beyond politics, thisis about competency of governance) might mean to our country and our people.

Lewis does this using his usual approach (which is a bit similar to John McPhee's new nonfiction approach). He finds interesting people who become narrative heros and guides to an area and ties them together into a compelling story or narrative. The areas Lewis explores? Presidential Transitions (guide: Max Stier); I Department of Energy/Tail Risk (guides: Tarak Shah, John MacWilliams), II USDA/People Risk (guides: Ali Zaidi, Kevin Concannon, Cathie Woteki), III Department of Commerce/All the President's Data (Guides: Kathy Sullivan, DJ Patil, David Friedberg).

This is a short book. It is relevant but still not top-shelf Lewis. I enjoyed it, but just wished it was bit longer and a bit deeper*. It

* I get the irony. This books scared the sh!t out of me. It made me sad. Therefore, I wish it were longer.

12 of 14 people found this review helpful