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  • Ghost Story

  • By: Peter Straub
  • Narrated by: Buck Schirner
  • Length: 22 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,176
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,071
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,070

For four aging men in the terror-stricken town of Milburn, New York, an act inadvertently carried out in their youth has come back to haunt them. Now they are about to learn what happens to those who believe they can bury the past - and get away with murder. Peter Straub's classic best seller is a work of "superb horror" ( Washington Post Book World) that, like any good ghost story, stands the test of time - and conjures our darkest fears and nightmares.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Story! The Best of Peter Straub

  • By Jaimie on 07-17-12

A suitable tale for Halloween!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-18

The story begins quite slow, which is reasonable considering most of the action happens in a lovely small town with characters who are common to all small American towns. The book leads listeners into the rhythms of life of each main character. We will gradually feel as if the members of the Chowder Club are as real as some of our own grandfathers who have done well - lawyers, doctors, real estate agents - who are mostly retired. But these five men are once again being haunted by a terrible thing that happened to them a long time ago. Nightmares. Bad feelings. Sleeplessness. Then some farm animals are being killed horribly. All five men feel like they are being followed. People start dying. Oh oh.

The last half of the book is where the scares really begin. The narrator does a great job.

  • Girls & Boys

  • By: Dennis Kelly
  • Narrated by: Carey Mulligan
  • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,588
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,121
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,067

A pulse-pounding new play from Tony Award-winning® playwright Dennis Kelly takes you on a journey that is at once hilarious, gripping, and heartbreaking. This world-premiere production starring Carey Mulligan (The Great Gatsby, An Education) is available exclusively on Audible after a celebrated run at the Royal Court Theatre in London and off-Broadway at the Minetta Lane Theatre. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow. Just . . . wow.

  • By GHBeckwith on 07-16-18

Powerful story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-18

I not only enjoyed listening to Carey Mulligan, I loved Dennis Kelly's amazing play adaptation for Audible's listeners. At first I was lost since I knew nothing about the play, but I caught on soon. Great drama and unfortunately true to life.

Mr. Kelly, I agree with you about Men.

  • Lonesome Dove

  • By: Larry McMurtry
  • Narrated by: Lee Horsley
  • Length: 36 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 640
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 575
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 573

 

Journey to the dusty little Texas town of Lonesome Dove and meet an unforgettable assortment of heroes and outlaws, whores and ladies, Indians and settlers. Richly authentic, beautifully written, always dramatic, Lonesome Dove will make listeners laugh, weep, dream, and remember. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Love the book, can't handle the narrator

  • By J. Hudson on 08-28-18

Wonderful story.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-18

'Lonesome Dove' by Larry McMurtry is an awesome read on every level. On the surface it is a terrific American Western adventure, the plot being that of what happens during a Western cattle drive from Texas to Montana taking place around maybe 1867 or later. The main characters are two ex-Texas Rangers, Augustus McCrae and Captain Woodrow Call, partners and owners of a small business called the Hat Creek Cattle Company. The nearby town is Lonesome Dove.

The two men are at the center of a circle of people: cowboys, vaqueros, a saloon/brothel owner, Native-Americans, sheriffs, bandits, prostitutes. Life in southern Texas is very slow and predictable since the various Indian and Mexican wars are over, the weather is almost always hot and dry, and strangers are few. Any excitement tends to be over quarrels about the superior quality of one horse over another. Conversation, if anyone feels so inclined among most Lonesome Dove inhabitants, consist mostly of gossip about locals, or if it was time to steal Mexican horses and cattle to sell to those getting together summer trail crews and cattle herds, or repetitive, never-resolved, arguments about remembered people, past battles and who is responsible to do whatever, as well as irritated comments regarding someone's personal tics and habits. Call and McCrae themselves have a routine of conversational comedic ripostes between them, mostly because McCrae is a talker interested in Humanity while Call is a glowering misogynist and misanthrope who feels people never work hard enough and are not worth wasting any time to talk to. However, both possess those mysterious qualities of leadership, intelligence and experience which draws many people to follow them. Despite this, both men have settled down now for a couple of decades into a routine existence running their business, hiring occasional temporary cowboys, selling cattle and horses.

Then Jake Spoon rides in, on the run. He can depend on his relationship to stay out of sight for awhile staying with Gus and Call because they were all Indian and bandit fighters together in the Texas Rangers. Jake suggests Gus and Call round up cows and horses for a cattle drive to Montana, claiming it is a great place for a ranch. Call can't get the idea out of his head, and soon he is giving orders, hiring cowboys, making plans. Gus isn't sure the idea is a good one at all - no one has driven cattle from Texas to Montana before. But soon they are on their way.

While on the surface the story is an exciting Western adventure of bandit attacks, shootouts, sand and rainstorms, murders, kidnappings and hangings, the novel is also an interesting in-depth character study of different Westerners. Each undergoes an individual journey of self-discovery and personal tests, exposing faulty self-aggrandizement or hidden strengths and new abilities - especially that of endurance. One teen character (a symbolic 'no man' or anyone, in literary parlance, an adopted orphan) grows up from being a simple boy apprentice into wisdom (a sad deflated place all of us elders know well) during the drive into the unknown future, and of traveling into a mysterious country of learning one's limitations.

Augustus was my favorite, but there is a large cast of fictional characters from which I am certain every reader will be able to pick one they like (and hate) from the cast. I think knew someone like them all, actually, in real life.

The writing is descriptively gorgeous and authentically colorful with hidden literary dimensions (primarily that of the characters) and in my opinion, the writing is the main reason to read 'Lonesome Dove' even if American Westerns aren't normally in your TBR stacks. This is where the upfront surface pleasure will be - the characters. Take your time on this book.

The book is divided into three parts. Each part goes deep into various areas of Western life - all of it fascinating and informative, and as easy to absorb as a spoon of sugar. The individual travails of each character are so exciting that the fact the reader is reading a book underlined by the classic literary theme of the 'hero's journey' is subtle and barely noticeable (these characters are too realistically and obviously flawed to view many of them as heroes). While the action is exciting, it is the interior journey of the characters, how they feel initially at the beginning of the cattle drive and how their adventures change them that is the point, however hidden the message of personal growth and disillusionment. Whatever. If literary themes do not speak to you, gentle reader, you will love the suspense of finding out which of these interesting and oh, so mortally foolish, wayward characters survive their mistakes and Fortune's arrows.

"To be, or not to be, that is the question:
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them: to die, to sleep
No more; and by a sleep, to say we end
the heart-ache, and the thousand natural shocks
that Flesh is heir to? 'Tis a consummation
devoutly to be wished. To die, to sleep,
To sleep, perchance to Dream; aye, there's the rub,
for in that sleep of death, what dreams may come,
when we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
must give us pause. There's the respect
that makes Calamity of so long life:
For who would bear the Whips and Scorns of time,
the Oppressor's wrong, the proud man's Contumely,
the pangs of despised Love, the Law’s delay,
the insolence of Office, and the spurns
that patient merit of the unworthy takes,
when he himself might his Quietus make
with a bare Bodkin? Who would Fardels bear,
to grunt and sweat under a weary life,
but that the dread of something after death,
the undiscovered country, from whose bourn
no traveller returns, puzzles the will,
and makes us rather bear those ills we have,
than fly to others that we know not of.
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
and thus the native hue of Resolution
Is sicklied o'er, with the pale cast of Thought,
And enterprises of great pitch and moment,
with this regard their Currents turn awry,
And lose the name of Action. Soft you now,
The fair Ophelia? Nymph, in thy Orisons
Be all my sins remember'd."

--Hamlet
Shakespeare


Personal illusions and hopeful dreams drive us forward into risks, rewards and fulfilment, but maybe not the ones we wanted.


The characters of Augustus McCrae and Woodrow Call are loosely based on real people - Oliver Loving and Charles Goodnight. Oliver Loving (1812-1867) is buried in the City Greenwood Cemetery, Weatherford, TX.




  • Stinker Lets Loose!

  • By: Mike Sacks, James Taylor Johnston
  • Narrated by: Jon Hamm, Eric Martin, Andy Richter, and others
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 978
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 910
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 916

Mike has teamed up with director Eric Martin to adapt the novelization into a fully immersive cinematic audio experience, and an epic all-star cast has come together to introduce Stinker to a whole new generation of fans! It's Smokey and the Bandit meets Every Which Way But Loose meets Smokey and the Bandit Parts 2 and 3. Feel the thrill as Stinker teams up with old pals Boner and Jumbo, plus new friends Buck and Rascal the Chimp, for a crazy ride across the highways and byways of Bicentennial America.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Live performance at end is worth it!

  • By Frank on 02-23-18

A complete waste of time

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-20-18

This audiobook is a based on a novelization of an old movie beloved by the producers of this audiobook, and I assume of the voice actors also, one of whom saw the movie as a child. He found the novelization at a used book store and immediately fell in love with book. It figures. He was recovering from his third divorce when he found the book. I suspect now why maybe three divorces - his judgment of what is funny and fun is juvenile and disgusting.

If, like many thirteen-year-old boys I guess as well as grownup males submitting reviews, going by the fanboy excitement about this recording , eating nose snot and smearing one’s own poop on one’s face while asleep or dead drunk is hilarious. Of course, such humor, I guess, that men apparently love, has made this audiobook a hit among them, since it is full of such juvenile hijinks. Added in are monkey horniness and big-chested women who somehow find these vile slobby smelly toothless racist sexist men attractive, and you have novel to kill for in middle school.

NOT RECOMMENDED.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Barrayar

  • A Vorkosigan Adventure
  • By: Lois McMaster Bujold
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 11 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,345
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,776
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,775

In the wake of interplanetary war, former commander Cordelia Naismith has deserted her own planet to marry the leader of the defeated enemy, Aral Vorkosigan. On his home planet of Barrayar, two rival factions are eyeing the recently vacated throne, and Aral, recently appointed Regent of Barrayar by the Emperor on his deathbed, must stand between them. Lord and Lady Vorkosigan, Aral and Cordelia struggle to establish stability in a fragile government thrown into confusion by the transition of power.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lois Bujold always delivers!

  • By Karen S. Coyle on 02-04-10

Entertaining and engaging.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-16-18

'Barrayar' is the sequel to Shards of Honor, the first novel in Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan science fiction series. Neither book is about the main character Miles Vorkosigan with whom most fans are familiar. Instead, we are treated to exciting wars of succession in which the two characters most responsible for raising Miles - his parents! - become unavoidably involved. In following novels (or preceding, depending on the order the reader chooses to read the series, because 'Barrayar' is actually the seventh novel by publishing date), most of the stories follow Miles, the snarky aristocrat/military adventurer.

I recommend reading 'Shards of Honor' first, as it is about how the two noble swashbucklers Captain Cordelia Naismith and Admiral Lord Aral Vorkosigan, unintentional as their swashbuckling is, meet. 'Barrayar' picks up the story a few months after where 'Shards of Honor' ends. This book explains how and why Miles was disabled by his bone diseases, although, as fans know, Miles has always maintained a lifestyle very similar to that any Jedi Knight would love - or perhaps, a comparison to the Star Wars Hans Solo character is closer to the mark.

In any case, Aral and Cordelia, especially Cordelia, are amazingly brave, noble and smart. They find themselves in the middle of a vicious struggle by various Barrayarian Counts who want to take over as Emperor of Barrayar. As the planet Barrayar has a culture similar to that of 19th-century patriarchal Russia, only with space ships and blasters, Cordelia particularly finds herself needing to think two steps ahead of everybody else because she is not from Barrayar but is from a culturally more liberal and technologically advanced world.

I liked Cordelia so much I wish Bujold had continued to include her adventures in the following books, but Cordelia, as well as Aral, are noble and upright characters who regret having to sometimes use ugly tactics to help in the political survival of their planet. Miles is not quite able to resist having a bit of fun on the side and he purposefully seems to court danger, throwing into every legitimate assignment or adventure some sideways convoluted scheme of his own. I also adored poor Sergeant Bothari.

Lois McMaster Bujold is a great writer of science fiction, and her books never disappoint. She specializes in character-driven tales, so gentle reader, be prepared to fall in love with most of the people she introduces to you. None of them are without flaws, and many have physical, mental or social disabilities. But usually they capture your heart, gentle reader, because they are good people despite being damaged.

Grover Gardner is excellent as a voice reader.

  • Alien: River of Pain

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Christopher Golden, Dirk Maggs
  • Narrated by: Anna Friel, Philip Glenister, Colin Salmon, and others
  • Length: 4 hrs and 52 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,370
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,181
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,172

Ellen Ripley finally returns to Earth, only to discover that LV-426 — where the crew of the Nostromo first came into contact with the deadly xenomorphs — has been renamed Acheron. Protected by Colonial Marines, the colonists seek to terraform the storm-swept planet against all the odds. But in the face of brutal living conditions and the daily struggles of a new world, there is humanity and hope.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Please make more of these! These are excellent!

  • By Brian on 04-28-17

Exciting thriller!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-23-18

Or course, it all is for naught...

The voice actors are great, and even the cat Jonesy does a stellar performance.

  • An Echo in the Bone

  • A Novel
  • By: Diana Gabaldon
  • Narrated by: Davina Porter
  • Length: 45 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 17,377
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 14,468
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 14,422

Jamie Fraser knows from his time-traveling wife Claire that, no matter how unlikely it seems, America will win the Revolutionary War. But that truth offers little solace, since Jamie realizes he might find himself pointing a weapon directly at his own son - a young officer in the British army. And Jamie isn't the only one with a tormented soul - for Claire may know who wins the conflict, but she certainly doesn't know whether or not her beloved Jamie survives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Read all of Gabaldon's stuff before this one

  • By Charles on 10-17-09

Absolutely stellar!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-18

Author Diana Gabaldon and narrator Davina Porter have done an amazing job bringing the American Revolution and the 18th century to life in this fictional series. This is a wonderful historical fiction series with an epic romance fueling the action. However, I would not start with this novel, number seven. I recommend beginning with ‘Outlander’, number one.

  • Command and Control

  • Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety
  • By: Eric Schlosser
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 20 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,120
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,952
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,944

Famed investigative journalist Eric Schlosser digs deep to uncover secrets about the management of America's nuclear arsenal. A groundbreaking account of accidents, near misses, extraordinary heroism, and technological breakthroughs, Command and Control explores the dilemma that has existed since the dawn of the nuclear age: How do you deploy weapons of mass destruction without being destroyed by them? That question has never been resolved - and Schlosser reveals how the combination of human fallibility and technological complexity still poses a grave risk to mankind.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stunning

  • By S. Mersereau on 10-14-13

Scary

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-18

Scott Brick does a great job narrating Eric Schlosser’s amazing true story about the history of developing America’s nuclear weapons and the near disasters of America’s nuclear maintenance. There were lots of military discussions on how and when to use nuclear weapons in war, too, which are terrifying to hear.

Many of the documents Schlosser gained access to in order to write this book were through the Freedom of Information Act and had been classified decades ago. Plus the author interviewed many of the scientists, officers and soldiers who had been involved in the development and maintenance of the varied types of nuclear weapons, and subsequent accidents. Schlosser’s writing is at a high level of literary quality as well.

I think the book is a fantastic overview for the general reader.

  • Origins

  • Fourteen Billion Years of Cosmic Evolution
  • By: Neil deGrasse Tyson, Donald Goldsmith
  • Narrated by: Kevin Kenerly
  • Length: 8 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,826
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,646
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,640

Origins explains the soul-stirring leaps in our understanding of the cosmos. From the first image of a galaxy birth to Spirit rover's exploration of Mars, to the discovery of water on one of Jupiter's moons, coauthors Neil deGrasse Tyson and Donald Goldsmith conduct a galvanizing tour of the cosmos with clarity and exuberance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliance!

  • By Max on 06-21-15

The origins of the Universe are simply explained.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-18

'Origins' is the best explanatory introduction to the formation and evolution of the Cosmos I have read! Co-author Neil DeGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist and co-author Donald Goldsmith is an astronomy writer, and in my opinion, they make a good team. The book is the most coherently arranged science book on this subject I have ever tried.

It has five parts:

Part I: The Origin of the Universe
Part II: The Origin of Galaxies and Cosmic Structure
Part III: The Origin of Stars
Part IV: The Origin of Planets
Part V: The Origin of Life (space aliens! - maybe)

There are 17 chapters.

I learned a great deal that I had never understood or had known about recent mainstream discoveries and theories gleaned from the Hubble Space Telescope, the Galileo spacecraft that explored Jupiter in 1995, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft which explored Saturn in 2004, and WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) which was launched in 2001 to study the cosmic background radiation.

Oh my, but I wish that fricking James Webb Space Telescope is completed before I die...

The two authors filled in many gaps in my knowledge, such as why most scientists think there was a Big Bang. A fascinating narrative in Chapter 1 'In the Beginning' mixes speculations as well as what has been gleaned from actual measurements and observations about the expansion of the Universe. I never knew about how particles and photons were so energized it took a while before the production of atoms was possible - about ten minutes into the cool down of the Big Bang.

I have heard endlessly (another Universe pun, sorry) about the cosmic background radiation (CBR) which had been accidentally detected in 1965 (pigeon poop was involved) after years of predictions by respectable Big Brain scientists since the 1940's. I did not have a clue why everyone thought it was proof of the Big Bang, only that the CBR was it somehow. The CBR was a proof of concept for astrophysicists because these now currently almost evenly distributed microwave spectrum waves go back to almost the beginning of time, maybe just when the Universe was 380,000 years old. These microwaves were once ferocious gamma-ray and X-ray photons from the Big Bang. Eventually the CBR will be in the radio wave spectrum in another one hundred billion years, not microwaves photons anymore, as these photons lose more and more of their original energy from the Big Bang. Scientists can actually detect, measure and have mapped visually the CBR to the beginning of the Universe, basically, microwaves coming from everywhere, with maybe some matter/gravity gaps, because atoms began to form then and gravity began to effect what had been a particle soup.

The temperature of the Universe, which scientists can measure, dropped as the size of the Universe expanded. How do they know the Universe is expanding, btw? The Doppler Effect of light! The explanation about how many ways scientists are using the Dopplar effect, such as to find exosolar planets, was astonishing!

Briefly, but with the most coherent explanations I have ever heard (kudos to the audiobook narrator, too), the author's explain the creation of atoms, space dust, types of suns and galaxies, dark energy, dark matter, elements (as in the element table), and what has been learned about some of the planets and their moons.

Included in the back of the book are a glossary of terms, a section for further reading, and an Index. Two sections of photos are in included that add depth (sort of a pun, you know, it's all about Space) to the explanations.

Heisenberg and Schrodinger are driving along the Autobahn when they are stopped by a police officer. The cop says to Heisenberg, who is driving, "Do you know how fast you were going?!" Heisenberg says, "No, but I knew where I was." "OK, smart guy," says the cop, "I'm going to search your car." So he does, and then comes back to the window. "Did you know you have a dead cat in a box in the truck?" Schrodinger says, "No, but I do now."

  • The Great Ideas of Philosophy, 2nd Edition

  • By: Daniel N. Robinson, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Daniel N. Robinson
  • Length: 30 hrs and 11 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,526
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,371
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,340

Grasp the important ideas that have served as the backbone of philosophy across the ages with this extraordinary 60-lecture series. This is your opportunity to explore the enormous range of philosophical perspectives and ponder the most important and enduring of human questions-without spending your life poring over dense philosophical texts.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Hard Review to Write

  • By Ark1836 on 11-20-15

An excellent historical overview of philosophy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-21-18

Professor Robinson has put together an intelligent presentation of the highlights in the history of philosophical ideas. He also has a fine prose style and an excellent speaking voice.