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Robert Stetson

  • 17
  • reviews
  • 120
  • helpful votes
  • 28
  • ratings
  • The Three-Day Affair

  • By: Michael Kardos
  • Narrated by: Ray Chase
  • Length: 7 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 139
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 121
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 122

Will, Jeffrey, and Nolan are lifelong friends. Each has gone their separate ways as adults, living their own lives while forging their own careers. They have no reason to believe anything extraordinary will befall them. Until one shocking moment changes everything. Will is a part-time drummer who spends the rest of his time in recording studios. Then one night Jeffrey attempts to rob a convenience store, drags a young woman into Will’s car, and shouts a single word: "Drive!" Shaken and confused, Will obeys.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Is there a score lower then zero

  • By Mike on 02-25-13

Much ado about nothing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-15-19

I downloaded this book after listening to the two other Kardos books available and rather liking them. This book's premise, however, was ridiculous. Without giving away too much, I think I can reveal the basic plot, which is that three men "accidentally" kidnap a young woman and then spend way too much time trying to decide what to do with her. By the time they decide, it has cost them dearly. But they could have just let her go at any time with little or no consequence . Instead they spend the rest of the book trying to decide how to untangle what eventually becomes an actual kidnapping.
The fact is there is a fairly compelling backstory and a clever twist to the plot and it could have been a good listen. Instead I spent 7 hours muttering, "What's the matter with you chuckle-heads?"

  • Two Kinds of Truth

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Titus Welliver
  • Length: 9 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,173
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,275
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,218

Harry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando Police Department and is called out to a local drugstore where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town's three-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the dangerous, big business world of pill mills and prescription drug abuse.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bosch Survives Two Career Ending Threats

  • By Russell on 11-20-17

Two kinds of Narrators

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-17-17

I think Michael Connelly gets better with every book. This timely story encompassing the opioid crisis as well as the corruption of the law by unscrupulous lawyers provides a great platform for his characters to really develop and entertain. This extremely brief review as prompted by another reviewer who simply hated the narrator, Titus Welliver and I felt I had to come to his defense. I simply love this guy's voice and tempo. I feel he gives the series a distinctive and welcome tone.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Shady Cross

  • By: James Hankins
  • Narrated by: Bon Shaw
  • Length: 9 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,764
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,478
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,469

In one hand small-time crook Stokes holds a backpack stuffed with someone else's money--$350,000 of it. In the other hand, Stokes has a cell phone, which he found with the money. On the line a little girl he doesn't know asks, "Daddy? Are you coming to get me? They say if you give them the money, they'll let you take me home."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fast paced, very entertaining

  • By shelley on 03-14-15

Just Wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-16

What made the experience of listening to Shady Cross the most enjoyable?

Not since running out of John Sandford's books to listen to have I enjoyed a thriller so much. How Hankins manages to make you care for his low-life criminal of a protagonist is a wonder to experience. It's not only "hard to put down" but it's impossible to listen to without alternately cringing and laughing out loud.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Shady Cross?

for some reason I still cringe when I think about Stokes getting his hand broken for looking at his watch. I think I actually said "Ow" aloud... and then was laughing a few seconds later.

Which scene was your favorite?

I think what happened when he broke into the antique dealers' home was just priceless.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

It was. I generally just listen to books while driving or doing brainless chores. But I ended up just sitting and listening to this one for quite some time.

Any additional comments?

I don't want to give away the ending but it was unusually good. Poetic even.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Deadline: Virgil Flowers, Book 8

  • By: John Sandford
  • Narrated by: Eric Conger
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,825
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,533
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,529

In Southeast Minnesota, down on the Mississippi, a school board meeting is coming to an end. The board chairman announces that the rest of the meeting will be closed, due to personnel issues. "Issues" is correct. The proposal up for a vote before them is whether to authorize the killing of a local reporter. The vote is four to one in favor.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best in this series

  • By MJ on 10-19-14

Possum Squeezin's it's not.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-14

John Sandford is the most talented writer of this genre, Eric Conger is the best narrator in this medium, and Virgil Flowers is the most likable protagonist you're going to find in any novel.
Add to the above a thoroughly venal mid-west school board that would resort to murder to maintain their façade, a dog-napping ring and a rural meth lab, and you've got a story that doesn't so much unfold as spill out uncontrollably and delightfully from the first sentence to the last.
As for the possum squeezin's: it's just one of the many analogies and descriptions that Sandford scatters around his books (this one referring to a Bloody Mary) that keep the reader chuckling through some of the grisliest situations.
It's a great listen.

  • The Secret History

  • By: Donna Tartt
  • Narrated by: Donna Tartt
  • Length: 22 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,129
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,549
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,549

The snow in the mountains was melting and Bunny had been dead for several weeks before we came to understand the gravity of our situation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Addictive

  • By Ann on 03-06-11

Compelling story, poorly told

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-14

Donna Tartt should really stick to writing and leave the reading to others. It's not that there is anything annoying about her voice, but it is not suitable for impressions of young men in college, who come off sounding like adolescent twits rather than the young adults facing serious conundrums that she portrays in this book. Actually, I take that back. Her rendition of Bunny was annoying; so much so that I stopped listening after the first hour or so.
Fortunately, I later found myself on a long car trip with nothing else in the queue and I resumed the story with some reservations. My sufferance was rewarded with a compelling story concerning the apparent life of privilege at an exclusive New England college. A small group of students, from actually very different origins, find themselves snarled up in in a suspenseful tangle of debauchery, deceit, murder and blackmail.
I found the characters all quite believable if not actually likable and the story unfolded in a very realistic manner. At bottom, it's a warning that one never really gets away with murder. It's worth a listen.

  • Death Benefits

  • By: Thomas Perry
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 13 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 420
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 301
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 304

A careful, methodical young data analyst for a California insurance company, John Walker knows when people will marry, at what age they will most likely have children, and when they will die. All signs point to a long successful career---until Max Stillman, a gruff security consultant, appears without warning at the office. It seems a colleague with whom Walker once had an affair has disappeared after paying a very large death benefit to an impostor.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My favorite book from one of my favorite authors.

  • By Julie on 08-11-09

Unexpected joyride

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-05-13

Thomas Perry has an hysterically droll sense of humor that I did not find in either the Butcher Boy series or in Metzger's Dog (which I didn't find at all funny). However, Perry's fraud investigator in Death Benefits is so droll and understatedly outrageous, I found myself bursting into laughter in the most quotidian situations, and the actuary, John Walker, is his perfect straight man. The narrator, Michael Kramer, does an absolutely perfect job.On more than one occasion I had to stop driving because my eyes were watering so freely.
That said, I thought the final chase and conclusion were a little over the top and a little bit of a let down. Funny how another reviewer thought this book lacked Perry's "usual sense of humor" but loved the ending. Go figure.
This is one of the few books I've listened to twice, because I just loved the ride, and it was just as enjoyable on the second go-round.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Silken Prey

  • Lucas Davenport, Book 23
  • By: John Sandford
  • Narrated by: Richard Ferrone
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,537
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,228
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,211

Very early one morning, a Minnesota political fixer answers his doorbell. The next thing he knows, he’s waking up on the floor of a moving car, lying on a plastic sheet, his body wet with blood. When the car stops, a voice says, "Hey, I think he’s breathing." And another voice says, "Yeah? Give me the bat." And that’s the last thing he knows. Davenport is investigating another case when the trail leads to the man’s disappearance, then - very troublingly - to the Minneapolis police department, then - most troublingly of all - to a woman who could give Machiavelli lessons.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Politics, Pornography, and Murder

  • By Jacqueline on 05-08-13

Another grand slam for Sandford

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-13

John Sandford just keeps batting them out of the park with his character-driven detective stories. This one revolves around a particularly dirty political trick and the people who perpetrated it. The characters are utterly believable, the dialogue is crisp, the descriptions are priceless, and the narration, by Richard Ferrone, is as usual, impeccable. If you haven't listened to any of Sandford's "Prey" series, this is as good a place as any to start. If you have, you probably don't need my encouragement to buy it.

  • The 9th Girl

  • By: Tami Hoag
  • Narrated by: David Colacci
  • Length: 13 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,627
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,349
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,353

On a frigid New Year’s Eve in Minneapolis, a young woman’s brutalized body falls from the trunk of a car into the path of oncoming traffic. Questions as to whether she was alive or dead when she hit the icy pavement result in her macabre nickname, Zombie Doe. Unidentified and unidentifiable, she is the ninth nameless female victim of the year, and homicide detectives Sam Kovac and Nikki Liska are charged with the task of not only finding out who Zombie Doe is but who in her life hated her enough to destroy her. Was it personal? Or could it just have been a crime of opportunity?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not Fond of Narrator, Characters Sterotypical

  • By Sires on 06-20-13

Juvenile and trite

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-13

I suppose there is some demand for a book about a tough-but-gentle mom/cop who loves her children but hates people who mutilate and murder innocent-but-misunderstood teenage girls, but I didn't realize I was contributing to it when I plunked down my credit towards this supposed mystery/suspense/thriller.
I'm frankly baffled by the good reviews this book has gotten, so I assume there is an appetite for these ingredients:
1: A corpse nicknamed Zombie Doe by the Minneapolis Police Force, because she looked like a zombie bouncing out of the trunk of a speeding car.
2: A curmudgeonly cop with an estranged daughter about the same age as Zombie Doe and a penchant for introspection.
3: A conflicted female cop who frets she works too hard and long for society at the expense of her fractured family
4: A conflicted female cop's teenaged son who thinks his mother works too long and hard at his expense, but shows real grit in the face of bullying and makes his mother proud because he's actually a great kid even if he's a free thinker and not one of the popular kids.
5: A self-centered mother of a troubled teen-aged girl who cares more about herself than her daughter (Imagine how that's going to end up!).
6: A diabolical serial killer.
7: A psychologist with a weakness for troubled teenaged girls and their mothers.

The recipe this book seems to follow is to combine these ingredients (along with a pinch of schmaltz and maybe a dash of self-righteousness ) and just shake and serve.
More predictable than mysterious, and more pedantic than suspenseful, this audiobook was about as thrilling as a Public Service Announcement.

32 of 36 people found this review helpful

  • Wild Thing

  • A Novel
  • By: Josh Bazell
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff, Stephanie Wolfe
  • Length: 8 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 572
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 514
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 514

It's hard to find work as a doctor when using your real name will get you killed. So hard that when a reclusive billionaire offers Dr. Peter Brown, aka Pietro Brnwa, a job accompanying a sexy but self-destructive paleontologist on the world's worst field assignment, Brown has no real choice but to say yes. Even if it means that an army of murderers, mobsters, and international drug dealers-not to mention the occasional lake monster-are about to have a serious Pietro Brnwa problem.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A Lot Like Cotton Candy

  • By Dr. on 02-24-12

Beaten to death

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-13-12

This otherwise funny, fast-paced, smart-allecky, page-turner is seriously marred by the author's irresistible urge to insult a large portion of his readers with repeated, gratuitous cracks about anyone who has an opinion at odds with the uberleft misanthropes that have informed his politics.
You can't help but like the protagonist, Pietro Brnwa as the callous, cynical physician on the run from the mafia, now hired to investigate a deadly and farcical lake monster scam in the backwoods of Minnesota. Kind of a cross between Hunter Thompson and Hugh Laurie, Brnwa is lured off his rotten job as shipboard quack aboard a cruise ship by a reclusive billionaire to accompany a sexy paleontologist on this questionable quest. It's a compelling story with some whacky characters and lots of snappy dialogue, but it gets weighed down with a cartoonish cameo by Sarah Palin that might seem funny to those still suffering from a severe case of BDS, but really isn't.
The narration is absolutely top-notch, though, and for left-leaning ideologues and global warming alarmists, the pointed and persistent sarcasm directed at those with differing opinions might very well enhance the over-the-top attitude that buoys the book. There is even an epilogue of sorts in which Bazell dispenses entirely with plot and characters and lectures us on the inherent evils of man in general and conservatives in particular. It’s not particularly cogent but it flows with the same wise-ass attitude that constitutes his style, and has an appeal of its own, at least for people who agree with him to begin with or have more patience for pompous pedantry than this listener.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Worst Fears Realized

  • Stone Barrington, Book 5
  • By: Stuart Woods
  • Narrated by: Richard Ferrone
  • Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 495
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 340
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 342

Stone and his ex-partner, Dino, are facing every policeman's worst fear: the people close to them are being murdered, probably by someone the two of them sent to prison in the past. To complicate matters, Stone finds himself involved in a distracting relationship with a woman who may be as dangerous as she is beautiful. As the body count multiplies, Stone and Dino race against time to find clues to the brilliant killer's identity.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Audiobook!

  • By Bruce on 06-23-10

Maybe not the worst

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-11

I bought this book hoping that Richard Ferrone's narration could make a mediocre book enjoyable. Surprisingly he managed to do that for the first couple of hours before the sheer implausiblility of Stuart Woods' characters, plot and dialogue made things nearly unlistenable. Stuart Woods clearly has an appreciative audience. I'm just not among them.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful